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The Perdue Chicken Cookbook
by Mitzi Perdue


Preface: Why I Chickened Out

Introduction: You Don't Need to Wing It! Let Frank Take You
Under His.
Everything You Wanted or Needed to Know about Selecting,
Storing and Cooking Chicken

Chapter 1.  Chicken for Everyday
Tips on Cooking in a Hurry, plus: Quick Recipes, Simple
Recipes, and Family Favorites

Chapter 2.  Chicken for the Microwave
Tips for Using the Microwave, plus: Quick Microwave
Recipes, and Classic Recipes Adapted for the Microwave

Chapter 3.  Chicken for Dieters
Tips for Dieters, plus: Low Calorie, Low Cholesterol
Recipes

Chapter 4.  Chicken for Children
Tips on Cooking for Kids, plus: Recipes for Kids to Eat and
Recipes for Kids to Cook

Chapter 5.  Chicken for Barbecuing
Tips for Cooking Outdoors, plus Recipes for Barbecuing

Chapter 6.  Chicken for Crowds
Tips on Quantity Cooking, plus Recipes for Crowds

Chapter 7.  Chicken for Tomorrow$or Next Week
Tips on Storing and Freezing, plus Cook Ahead Recipes

Chapter 8.  Chicken for Holidays
Chicken and Holiday Cooking, plus: Menus and Recipes for
the Chinese New Year, Valentine's Day, Mother's Day, Fourth
of July, Thanksgiving, Chanukah, and Christmas

Chapter 9.  Chicken for Important Occasions
Chicken for When You Want Something Different and Exciting,
plus Show Stopper Recipes

Chapter 10. Chicken for Planovers
Tips on Food Safety, plus Recipes for the Rest of the Bird

Conclusion: A Rare Bird
What Frank Is Really Like



Acknowledgements



I've often thought that inspiration is one of the
greatest gifts one person can give another, and there are
several people who were an inspiration in writing this
book. First is a woman whom I would term the Godmother of
this book, Connie Littleton, the Director of Advertising
and Marketing Services at Perdue. She is a woman totally
committed to excellence, and if that commitment to
excellence meant she had to read and edit until the wee
hours of the morning, she always did it as if it were a
matter of course. With each passing day, I gained
increasing respect for her professionalism, judgment and
knowledge. Bev Cox, a home economist and food stylist, was
an inspiration for her meticulous attention to detail, her
enthusiasm, and her unfailing good humor no matter what.
Beth Fusaro, who typed most of the recipes in this book, is
a Renaissance Woman, who knows not only about food and
typing, but also about everything from making pottery to
preserving the environment.  It's been a privilege to work
with Beth.  Gretchen Barnes, who assisted Bev Cox in
editing, learned a whole new computer program, Word
Perfect, in order to get the job done quickly. Sharon
Sakemiller, who is already a Word Perfect expert, also
helped with typing and retyping recipes.  She impressed
everyone with how rapidly she could get things done.

My sincere thanks to the members of American Agri-Women who
over the years have shared their food tips with me.  Also,
deepest thanks to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's
Cooperative Extension. One of Cooperative Extension's major
activities is helping to educate consumers, and I owe
Cooperative Extension a deep debt of gratitude for the
education I've received through their many publications,
broadcasts, classes, seminars, meetings, and personal
contacts. The following Cooperative Extension members$many
of whom are good friends as well as professional
colleagues$have been invaluable resources for food tips and
food knowledge: Dorothy Thurber, Kathryn Boor, Christine
Bruhn, Ellen Pusey, Sally Foulke, Bonnie Tanner, Bettie
Collins, Sue Snyder, Chuck Waybeck, and George York.  Also
thanks to Dot Tringali of the National Broiler Council, to
Connie Parvis of the Delmarva Poultry Industry, to Joy
Schrage from the Whirlpool Corporation, and Lisa Readie
from the Barbecue Industry Association.












PREFACE
WHY I CHICKENED OUT

Want to know a high stress situation?  Try being a
food writer and cookbook author, and then marry Frank
Perdue.  You come home from the honeymoon, everything has
been wonderful and then...it's time to Cook the First Meal!
Frank wants to eat chicken and you're supposed to be a good
cook.

I remember that afternoon so vividly. I knew he'd be
coming home around six and that he'd be hungry.  Now up
until that day, I had always felt fairly confident in the
kitchen.  After all, I love cooking and trying new recipes
is my favorite pastime.  But cooking chicken for Frank
Perdue?  I began to get stage fright.  As I was trying to
find where the pots and pans were in his kitchen, I started
calculating that there were probably few people in the
world who've eaten chicken more times than my husband.
"He's been eating chicken almost daily for  his entire
life" I thought, "he likes it, he cares about it, and my
cooking is about to be judged by a world class expert."

As I rummaged around looking for the right herbs and
spices$and couldn't find the ones I liked $ my stage fright
grew worse. "This man must be one of the world's greatest
experts on cooked chicken," I thought to myself.  "He's
attended dozens and dozens of chicken cooking contests,
he's been part of hundreds and hundreds of taste testings
for Perdue products.  Everywhere he goes, people know he
likes chicken and the best chefs and hostesses in the world
have served it to him."  In my mind I ran through some of
the times when together we'd driven an hour out of the way
to go to a restaurant that cooked chicken particularly
well, and how he always seemed to have lists of the
restaurants he wanted to visit.

Help!  My stage fright was getting still worse.  The
thirty year old oven didn't seem to be heating right, but I
couldn't be sure because there wasn't any oven thermometer.
The "elbow test," which our grandmothers used to use before
the days of thermometers (you stick your elbow in the oven
and feel how hot it is), told me that things weren't right,
but I didn't know how far off the oven was so I didn't know
how to compensate.  As I rubbed my elbow with my other
hand, I thought of Frank's reputation for being demanding.
If you've seen the ad that we call "Boot Camp," you know
what I mean.  (He plays the part of a drill sergeant in
this ad and teaches the new Perdue recruits the 57 quality
points that they have to inspect -- and then he's all over
one recruit for missing what seems like an invisibly small
hair.)

It's a funny thing, but when you start losing your
confidence, you start asking some basic questions about
what you're doing.  Part of me was saying that cooking
chicken is pretty simple; after all, I'd been doing it for
most of my life. But another part of me realized when
attempting to cook chicken for Frank the first time, that I
knew very little of the basics of cooking chicken.  Like,
for example, what makes a chicken tender?  How do you
really know when it's done$and not over done?  How do you
get the best flavor?  Should you salt before or after
cooking?

In desperation, I made a two-part promise to myself.
First, I'd let myself take the easy way out that first
meal, and not even try to cook the chicken myself.
Instead, dinner would be a never-fail salad,  pasta (Frank
loves pasta),  plus store-bought fully-cooked Perdue
Tenders.  In return for letting myself off so easily, I'd
make it my business from then on to learn how to make the
best chicken every time.  That meant asking Frank every
question that popped into my head;  checking with the food
technologists who work for Perdue; getting tips from the
farmers who grew the Perdue chickens; and systematically
going through the thousands of recipes that Frank has in
his files, trying a different one each night.

Dinner that night wasn't the show piece I would have
liked to create, but it was good enough and Frank happens
to love his own Tenders so the chicken part of the meal was
a success.  In the time since, I've tried to live up to the
second part of the promise, the one about learning how to
serve the best chicken every time.

In this book, I'd like to share with you the most
useful cooking tips and  the most appealing, most
successful recipes developed by Perdue Farms over the last
twenty years.  The first chapter contains the kinds of
information I wished I'd known from the beginning.  You
don't need to read this chapter, because chicken isn't that
hard to cook; but there are tips in it that can save you
time and money and that can enable you to cook with greater
confidence.  This chapter also has the latest tips on food
safety.

The remaining chapters are organized, not by method of
cooking or whether the food is an appetizer or salad or
whatnot; but rather by the kind of occasion you're facing.
You want to put some spark and variety into every day
meals? You want to make the most of your microwave? Or
you're in a hurry today?  Maybe you need something that
will please kids?  Or you're dieting?  You've got a bunch
of leftovers?  You have to cook for a hundred people
tomorrow night?  I tried to think of the kinds of
situations in which you could need recipes and then I
organized Frank's recipes around them.          Jean Brillat-
Savarin, the famous French gourmet, once said,  "A chicken
to a cook is like a canvas to a painter."  Enjoy the
recipes and tips that follow, and may they help you to feel
the creativity and confidence that make cooking fun and
eating a joy!



YOU DON'T HAVE TO WING IT!
LET FRANK TAKE YOU UNDER HIS.
Everything You Wanted or Needed to Know about
Cooking Chicken


Frank gets roughly 40,000 consumer letters a year.
Half of these are requests for pamphlets, but many of the
others are requests for information on selecting, storing,
serving, or cooking his products.

These letters are tremendously important to Frank.
Often I've been with him when he has a few extra minutes,
such as waiting for an airplane, and he'll dash to a pay
phone to answer one of the letters with a phone call.  He
also likes to attend store openings or conventions or other
public places because he genuinely wants to hear what
people are thinking. One of the marketing men once told me
that he was embarrassed about a day he had planned for
Frank because it included meetings with people who owned
just a few stores.  When I passed this on to Frank, he
answered that these were some of the best meetings because
the owners of the smaller stores were so close to their
customers.  He went on to say that the reason he likes to
visit butchers (and in New York, he's called on as many as
30 in two days) is that these men are close to the needs
and wants of their customers and he can learn things from
them that he'd learn in no other way.

I've heard that there's almost no other head of a
Fortune 500-size company who would spend as much time with
the people who buy his products.  People are often
surprised that a man with his responsibilities would take
the time for this much face to face contact. But the fact
is, learning what people care about is almost a religion to
him.

Here are some of the questions that people either
write to Frank or ask him in person.  In answering the
questions, I've either used the information I've heard
Frank give, or else I've checked with the Perdue food
scientists or home economists.
What should I look for when I shop for chicken?
Whatever city we're in, whether it's on the East Coast, or
Puerto Rico, or even London or Moscow or Tokyo, Frank
visits supermarkets the way other people visit museums or
monuments.  He notices the following kinds of things
himself and would recommend that you do also when selecting
chicken.

        _Give the package a little squeeze.  Are there
signs of ice along wings, backs or edges?  Frank explained
to me that some chicken producers blast their birds with
air as cold as -40o F, but he never does.  Freezing causes
a breakdown in protein, loss of natural juices, and reduced
tenderness. Also,  when you cook a frozen bird, the bones
and nearby meat may turn an unappetizing dark color.

        _Look at the thickness of the meat in proportion
to the bone.  If, for example, the breast looks scrawny,
you're paying a lot for bone rather than meat.

        _Read the labels so you know what you are
getting.  Many different parts and combinations are
available, and some look surprisingly alike even to Frank's
trained eye.  The label tells exactly what is inside.

        _Ask questions.  If any meat or poultry product
doesn't look, feel, or smell just right, check with the
professionals behind the counter.

        _Notice the pull date.  Most stores are
scrupulous about removing               chicken before the pull
date expires$but sometimes there's a slip-up.

        _Was the chicken well-cleaned?  Or are there
little traces of feathers or hairs?  These can look really
unattractive when the bird is cooked.

        _Is the chicken stored correctly on the chilling
shelf, or are the trays of chicken stacked so high that the
top ones aren't kept cold?  When that happens, the shelf
life of the top ones is seriously shortened.

        _Is the meat case kept so cold that the fresh
chicken is frozen and ends up with ice crystals on the
tray? If so, complain to the manager.

        _Look at the ends of the bones.  Are they pink or
are they  turning gray?  Generally, the more pink the bone
ends are, the fresher the chicken.
How should I store chicken at home?

Chicken, like all meat, is perishable.  It should be
stored in the coldest part of the refrigerator (40o or
below), sealed as it comes from the market, and used within
two or three days of purchase.
Should I freeze chickens?

Frank doesn't recommend freezing poultry. However, if
a bird must be held beyond three days, freezing will keep
it wholesome.
How do I freeze poultry?

When freezing is necessary, seal chicken or other
poultry in an airtight container, heavy plastic bag,
plastic wrap, foil or freezer paper.

Try to have the wrapping tight against the chicken
because any place where it isn't, small ice crystals will
form. That means moisture has been drawn from the meat, and
where that's happened, the meat will be tough and breading
won't stick.

Frozen uncooked chicken can be stored up to six
months; frozen cooked chicken should be used within three
months. (Personally I try to avoid freezing chicken since I
know that freezing makes the chicken less tender and less
juicy. Still, in spite of good intentions, I sometimes end
up doing it. I've learned to make it a point to have a wax
marking pencil and freezer tape handy, so I can label the
package with the date and contents. I wonder if you've
found, as I have, that it's unbelievably easy to lose track
of how long things have been in there.)

Do not stuff poultry before freezing, and freeze
cooked birds and stuffing separately.
Can frozen chicken be thawed and frozen again?

Each time you freeze chicken, you sacrifice quality.
If carefully handled, however, it is safe to defrost
uncooked chicken and to freeze it again after cooking.  If
frozen after cooking, do not thaw and freeze again.
Why is chicken sometimes implicated in illness?

In a warm, moist environment, illness-causing bacteria
can grow in high-protein, low-acid foods such as meat,
fish, poultry, eggs and milk.  But there is no reason to
become ill from eating or serving these foods, if they are
cooked thoroughly and served or refrigerated immediately.
To prevent transferring bacteria from one food to another,
use warm water and soap to wash hands, utensils and work
surfaces before and after use.
What makes chicken tender -- or tough?

Frank does his best to make Perdue chickens as tender
as possible,  but there's also a lot you can do.

_Don't let chicken dry out in the refrigerator;  dry
chicken is tough chicken. Keep it wrapped in the package it
comes in until you use it.

_Avoid freezing it.  When the juices inside the cells
freeze, they act like little spears and they'll rupture
some of the cell walls.  When you defrost the chicken,
you'll lose some of the juice and the chicken will be less
tender.

_Cook chicken to the proper temperature, using a meat
thermometer or pop-up guide. Cook bone-in chicken to 180
degrees and boneless chicken to 170 degrees. Undercooked
chicken will be tough and rubbery because it takes a fairly
high internal temperature to soften the proteins in the
muscles and make them tender.  But don't overcook chicken
either, because  moisture will start to steam off, and the
more chicken dries out, the tougher it gets.

_Keep the skin on chicken during cooking. The skin
helps keep juices in, and tenderness and juiciness go hand
in hand. I've tried this both ways, and the difference is
significant. (When you cook chicken with the skin on,
approximately half the fat from the skin is absorbed into
the meat; if calories and cholesterol are very important to
you, you might want to remove the skin before cooking even
if it means a less tender result.)

_When microwaving any chicken product, cover with a
loose tent of waxed paper to prevent drying.

_Some authorities feel strongly that you should not
salt the chicken before cooking because salt draws the
juices out during cooking and toughens the meat.  In my
experience, there is a detectable difference in tenderness
between salting before cooking and salting afterwards; the
chicken that I salted afterwards was slightly more tender.
Still, I would guess that most people, myself included,
wouldn't notice a big difference unless they were
specifically paying attention to it.  The difference
doesn't jump out at you as it does with overcooking or
freezer burn.

_Fry or roast breast pieces rather than microwaving
them if tenderness is a top priority for you.  Microwaving
is significantly faster, but there's a greater risk of
toughness when you microwave breast meat.  Breast meat is
fairly dry to begin with, and you don't have a whole lot of
latitude between overcooking and undercooking. With breast
meat, there's a trade-off between the speed of microwaving
and the reliability of frying or roasting.


Why are some chickens yellow skinned and some white?

 A chicken's skin color comes from the diet it was fed
and the same bird could have a white skin or a yellow skin,
depending on what it ate. The diet that produces a yellow
skin is more expensive than the usual diet, but the people
at Perdue Farms feel it's worth it because a yellow skin
color is one of the fastest ways Frank's inspectors have of
finding and disqualifying an inferior bird.  If a bird is
sick or off its feed, it doesn't absorb nutrients well and
won't develop the rich golden color that is characteristic
of Perdue birds. Also, if part of  a bird's outer skin is
"barked", that is, rubbed off due to rough handling during
processing, the Perdue inspectors can detect it more easily
than with a white-skinned bird.  Detecting and removing and
chicken with a barked skin is important because damaged
skin shortens the shelf life and dries out and toughens the
meat.  No white colored chickens get by the inspectors.
Sometimes when I open a package of chicken, there's a
pungent odor that doesn't smell spoiled, but it's
definitely unpleasant. Should I throw the chicken out?

If the odor lasts only a matter of seconds, your
chicken is probably fine.  Meat is chemically active, and
as it ages, it releases sulfur. When you open a bag that
doesn't have air holes, you may notice the accumulated
sulfur, but it will quickly disperse into the air. In fact,
I've heard of cases where a wife will lean over to her
husband and say, "Smell this, I think it's gone bad."
He'll take a deep whiff and find nothing wrong with it.
She'll take another sniff and then wonder if it was her
imagination.  It wasn't. It's just that once the package
was opened, the sulfur smell faded into the air like smoke
rings.

If the chicken still smells bad after a couple of
minutes, that's an entirely different story. The problem is
bacterial spoilage or rancidity or both.  Return the
chicken to the store where you bought it and write to
Frank. If a chicken's been around too long you can smell
it, and if you can't detect it at room temperature, you
probably can as it cooks, since rancidity is more obvious
at higher temperatures.  Rancidity can occur without
bacteria if the freezer where the meat was stored wasn't
cold enough or if the product was kept there for a very
long time, such as more than six months for uncooked
chicken, or more than three months for cooked chicken. (By
the way, I don't like to focus on this unpleasant stuff,
but I do want you to get your money's worth when you're
buying chicken.)
Are chickens given hormones?

Never. I remember when I lived on the West Coast,
there was a small company that advertised that its
chickens were grown without hormones.  I thought this was
unethical, because it implied that other chickens were
grown with hormones.  The fact is none are.
Can I cook frozen chicken, or do I have to let it defrost
first?

In a pinch, go ahead, but allow extra cooking time.
For the best texture and tenderness, however, you're better
off starting from refrigerator temperatures; you can be
more sure of getting an evenly cooked product.
How long can I keep chicken at room temperature?

From the point of view of food safety, you're taking a
risk if you leave it outside the refrigerator for more than
two hours. Unfortunately, bacteria  grow and multiply at
temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees, and they
flourish at room temperature. To avoid food borne illness,
all foods of animal origin should be kept  either hotter
than 140 degrees or colder than 40 degrees.  If you know
you won't be returning home directly after shopping, bring
along an insulated bag or box to keep cold foods cold until
you can get them into the refrigerator.
Do I need to rinse chicken before cooking?

Advice on this has varied over the years, including
the advice Frank gives.  The latest research shows that
from a health point of view, washing is not necessary.  Any
microbes that you'd wash off will be entirely destroyed by
heat when you cook the meat.  It's actually far more
important to wash your hands, your cutting board, and your
utensils since they won't be sterilized by cooking.
How do I get the best flavor?

That depends on whether you're after a mild and
delicate flavor, or a strong and robust flavor. The younger
the bird, the milder the flavor.  A game hen, which is five
weeks old, will have the mildest flavor of all. A broiler,
at seven weeks, will still have a quite mild and delicate
flavor; a roaster, on the other hand, is usually about five
weeks older than a broiler and it will have a much more
pronounced "chickeny" flavor.  (Frank and I enjoy chicken
at all ages, but if we had to choose on flavor alone, we'd
most often go for the roasters.) For a really strong,
chickeny flavor, see if you can find fowl or spent hens or
stewing hens. These birds are around 18 months old, which
means they're going to be quite tough, but if you use them
in soups or stews, they'll add an excellent flavor.
I've had chicken in the freezer for a year.  Is it still
edible?

From a health point of view it would be ok, but the
flavor and texture will have deteriorated and it just won't
be particularly tasty.  I stored chicken in the freezer for
a year once as an experiment, just to see what it would be
like.  It wasn't awful, but it was kind of flat and
tasteless. I remember wondering if this was what cotton
tasted like - although to be fair, it wasn't really that
bad.
Why are bones sometimes dark?

Darkened bones occur when the product has been frozen.
Freezing causes the blood cells in the bone marrow to
rupture and then when the chicken is thawed, these ruptured
cells leak out and cause visible reddish splotches on the
bones.  When cooked, these discolorations will turn from
red to almost black.
Is it true that breast meat is the least fattening part of
a chicken?

Yes.  Breast meat has about half the fat of thigh
meat. If calories or cholesterol are important to you,
choose the breast meat.  Frank watches his cholesterol and
I've never seen him go for anything but breast meat. Is it
better to cook a chicken quickly at a high temperature-or
slowly at a low temperature?

Both work, but with high temperatures, you run a
greater risk of uneven cooking, with the wings and legs
becoming overcooked before the rest of the bird is done.
Usually we recommend a moderate temperature of 350 degrees
for whole birds and 375 degrees for parts. If you are in a
hurry and want to use a higher temperature, then shield the
wings and legs by wrapping them with aluminum foil if
they're starting to become too brown.
How much should I allow for shrinkage when cooking chicken?

For each 3-ounce serving of cooked poultry, buy an
extra ounce to allow  for shrinkage and an extra two ounces
to allow for bone.
If I want to use different parts of the chicken from what
the recipe calls for, how do I go about making
substitutions?

This table should help:

Name of Part              Approximate No. to Equal One
Whole Chicken   Whole breasts                           3

Half breasts                                    6

Whole leg (thigh and drumstick) 6

Thigh                                           12

Drumsticks                                      14

Wing                                            14

Drumette (upper part of wing)   24

When using cooked chicken, allow one pound of whole
uncooked chicken for each cup of cooked, edible chicken
meat.
How do you truss a chicken?
HERE HAVE ILLUSTRATION SHOWING HOW

What's the best way to carve a chicken?
HERE HAVE ILLUSTRATION SHOWING HOW

Some of your recipes call for roasters. I don't live in an
area where Perdue chicken is sold, and I haven't been able
to find roasters in the stores.  What exactly is a roaster,
and can I substitute a broiler?

A Perdue Oven Stuffer Roaster is a 12 week old bird
especially developed for a broad breast.  Roasters are
bigger than broilers, and have a more favorable meat to
bone ratio than broilers.   Because they are older birds,
they also have a much deeper, richer flavor. You can use
broilers in roaster recipes, but plan on the chicken's
being done sooner and having a noticeably milder flavor.

        Frank, by the way, is the man responsible for
creating the roaster market. Back in the early 1970s, when
few people had ever heard of a roaster, he was the one who
worked to breed these broad-breasted birds, and who put the
effort into advertising so people would learn about the new
product.  He surprised his colleagues by how determined he
was in his developing and marketing efforts. One of the men
who worked with Frank told me that he was amazed that
Frank, who will hang onto an old pair of shoes to save $50,
was willing to spend millions to let people know about the
product, and further, he did it without a qualm, because he
had such belief in it. If you haven't tried an Oven Stuffer
Roaster and you're visiting the East Coast, try one, and
you'll see why Frank believed in it so much.


Chapter One: CHICKEN FOR EVERYDAY


Napoleon's cook once bet that he could cook chicken a
different way every day of the year.  The cook found that
this was an easy bet to win, and I can see why, having
looked at the recipes in Frank's files. Chicken's
versatility seems almost endless. Perdue Farms home
economists have been developing chicken recipes since the
early 1970s and as a result, Frank has more than 2000
chicken recipes. If only Napoleon had chosen to bet with
me, I could have won even if he'd said the bet was for six
years!

In this chapter, you'll find some of Frank's and my
favorites for every day cooking. But there are different
kinds of every day cooking, so I've divided the chapter
into three sections to take care of three different every
day situations.

The first section, Fast Food Chicken from Your
Refrigerator, is for when you're in a hurry and want dinner
on the table in the shortest possible time. None of these
recipes takes more than 15 minutes, and many are ready in
five. However, you will find special tricks to make the
food more interesting than just heat and serve.

The second section, Perdue Plus Five, is for when you
don't mind if dinner isn't ready for another hour or so,
but you want your part of the preparation to be as brief as
possible. The recipes in this section use only five
ingredients in addition to chicken, salt, and pepper, and
all of the recipes are simple to prepareathough they may
take awhile to cook.

The third section, Family Favorites, is for relaxed
times.  When you don't mind spending some time putting
together something your family will really like, try this
section.
FAST FOOD CHICKEN FROM YOUR REFRIGERATOR
   (PHOTO:  The most valuable player on the TV Football-
party table might be Perdue Done It!)

Frank loves to tell people that they can pick up
delicious, fast-food chicken within easy walking
distanceatheir refrigerators. "When you're hungry and in a
hurry," he says, "you don't need to rush across town for
great chicken.  You can just walk (slowly) to your
refrigerator and pick up my Perdue Done It! chicken."

Although fried foods are notoriously high in fat,
particularly fast food ones.  Perdue Done It! is an
exception.  Frank flash fries the Perdue Done It!
products.  They are in oil for seconds only.  Further, to
assure the chicken is as low in saturated fat as possible,
Perdue uses only polyunsaturated soybean oil.

In the recipes that follow, I've used generic nuggets,
cutlets, tenders, and other fully cooked products.
However, try for the Perdue Done It! if you live in the
Perdue marketing area, which is the East Coast and some of
the Mid Western states.  The Perdue nuggets, cutlets and
tenders come from white meat fillets, while some of the
other brands are pressed and formed from dark meat chicken
and don't have the best texture or flavor.
TENDERS, AND NUGGETS
Chick on a Biscuit:  Split hot baked biscuits.  Fill each
with a breaded chicken nugget and a thin slice of ham; top
with mustard.
Chicken Mexicali:  Top cutlets or tenders with prepared
salsa and avocado slices.
Chicken Parmesan:  Top partially heated cutlets with
spaghetti sauce and sliced mozzarella cheese; broil briefly
to melt cheese.
Super Caesar Salad:  Quarter heated nuggets and toss with
croutons, Romaine lettuce, and Caesar salad dressing.
Holiday Crepe:  Heat breast tenders and place on a warm
crepe.  Top with cranberry sauce and roll up; serve with
sour cream.
Japanese Meal-in-a-Bowl:  Prepare Japanese-style noodle
soup (ramen) as directed.  Add heated chicken breast
nuggets or tenders, sliced scallions and a dash of soy
sauce.  (I often put this in a Thermos and bring it to
Frank at his office when he's working late.)
Nugget Sticks:  On metal skewers, alternately thread 4 to 5
chicken breast nuggets with 2 inch pieces of bacon.  Heat
in oven as directed on nugget package.  Dip into prepared
chutney or sweet-sour sauce.
Stir-Fry Snack:  Stir-fry wings in a little oil with red
bell pepper strips, scallions and sliced water chestnuts.
Season with soy sauce.  Serve over rice.
Substantial Sub:  Split a loaf of Italian bread lengthwise.
Pile on heated breaded chicken cutlets or tenders,
provolone cheese, sliced tomato, sweet onion, pimentos and
shredded lettuce.  Douse with bottled salad dressing and
dig in.
Tenders Under Wraps: Brush Boston lettuce leaves with
prepared hoisin sauce or Chinese-style duck sauce.  Place a
heated tender or 2 nuggets and a piece of scallion on top.
Roll up lettuce around tender, securing with a toothpick.
PRECOOKED HOT & SPICY WINGS
Chicken Antipasto:  Arrange hot & spicy wings on platter
with slices of provolone cheese, sliced tomatoes, marinated
artichoke hearts and olives.
Out-of-Buffalo Wings:  Warm hot & spicy wings and arrange
with celery sticks around a blue cheese dip. Combine 3/4
cup mayonnaise, 1/3 cup crumbled blue cheese and 1 minced
scallion in a small bowl.
Speedy Arroz Con Pollo:  Prepare a box of Spanish rice mix
as package directs.  During last 10 minutes of cooking
time, add 1 package hot & spicy wings, 1 package thawed
frozen peas and 1/2 cup sliced olives. ed chicken, toasted
almonds, and chopped scallions.  Blend in mayonnaise
flavored with curry powder and spoon back into pineapple
shell to serve.
Cheesy Chick:  Prepare packaged stuffing mix as directed,
adding 1 cup shredded Jarlsberg or Swiss cheese.  Stuff
whole roasted chicken or Cornish hens with mixture; heat
until warmed through.
Chicken Frittata:  Shred roasted chicken or cut breaded
chicken into cubes.  Add to beaten eggs, along with
mushrooms, onions, and any leftover vegetables.  Cook
mixture quickly, forming into an open-faced omelet or
frittata.
Chicken Normandy:  Arrange cut-up roasted chicken or
Cornish hen meat in a shallow baking dish and scatter
thinly sliced apples around pieces.  Cover and heat until
hot and apples are tender.  Stir in a little light or heavy
cream and warm to serve.
Chicken Reuben:  Thinly slice roasted chicken.  Pile on
sliced rye that's been spread with Russian dressing.  Top
with prepared sauerkraut, a slice of Swiss cheese, and
another slice of rye.  Grill or pan fry sandwiches until
cheese melts.
Chicken Sesame:  Brush roasted chicken or Cornish hens with
bottled salad dressing; sprinkle surface with sesame seeds
and heat as directed.
Fabulous Fajitas:  Slice roasted chicken into strips.
Saute in oil, adding lime juice, garlic, and ground cumin
to taste.  Roll up in warm flour tortillas and top with
chunks of avocado, chopped scallion, and cherry tomatoes.
Pasta Pizazz:  Saute pieces of roasted or breaded chicken
with sliced zucchini, chopped onion, sliced mushrooms, and
garlic.  Add a dash of heavy cream and toss with hot cooked
spaghetti or noodles.
Power Pita:  Slice roasted chicken and stuff into a whole
wheat pita bread.  Top with shredded carrots, alfalfa
sprouts, red pepper strips and a tablespoon of dressing
made of plain yogurt  seasoned with lemon juice, curry
powder and salt and pepper to taste.
Stir Fried Chicken:  Dice roasted chicken into a wok or
skillet and stir-fry with scallions, celery, mushrooms, and
peas.  Add cooked rice and soy sauce to taste; toss well.
Super Spud:  Halve a baked potato and top with shredded
roasted chicken mixed with a little mayonnaise.  Pile on
shredded Swiss cheese, bacon bits, and chopped chives; bake
or microwave until cheese melts.
Taco Perdue:  Cube roasted chicken and serve in taco
shells, topped with shredded lettuce, chopped tomatoes,
onion, shredded cheese, and taco sauce.
PHOTO:  Harvest fruit adds seasonal flavor to chicken - 3
Golden Nugget Salad: Heat 1 package of chicken breast
nuggets.  Combine with Romaine lettuce, halved cherry
tomatoes and diced avocado.  Toss with your favorite
dressing.

NUGGETS OR TENDERS WITH DIP
Fully cooked breaded chicken breast nuggets (14-18 per
package)

or
Tenders (6-8 per package)
Following package directions, warm nuggets or tenders in a
conventional oven or, using package tray, heat in a
microwave oven.  Serve with ketchup or your favorite
mustard.  For myself, I've been trying some of the more
exotic mustards from the supermarket and sometimes I put
out several kinds in pretty little dishes that I'd
otherwise use for nuts.  Instead of a wine or cheese
tasting, my guests end up trying different mustards.



                PERDUE PLUS FIVE

When was the last time you baked a pie from scratch?

I'm asking you this question because I'm guessing that
you're like many other people who've told me that today
they'd never have time to bake a pie from scratch.  They
might have once, but they don't have the time any more.

In the last few years I've asked this question to
dozens and dozens of audiences when giving talks.  Almost
always, I get the same answer: that people who once had had
the time to do a lot of cooking now seldom do. The want to
eat well, they enjoy cooking, but they just can't find the
time.

If you were to ask me that question, I'd have to
answer that I haven't found time to bake a pie from scratch
in years either. Frank keeps me so busy that sometimes I
think that I'm married to a whirlwind.  People joke that
he's the only man you'll ever meet who can enter a
revolving door in the compartment behind you and come out
ahead of you. They also joke that he doesn't get ulcers$but
he's a carrier.

Knowing quick recipes has become more important to me
than ever, and this section contains a selection of the
best. The heating and cooking time may take an hour or so,
but your part in the kitchen should be no more than fifteen
minutes.  In this section, you'll find uncomplicated
recipes with few steps, and none of the recipes have more
than five ingredients in addition to chicken, salt, pepper
and water.

If like me, you also are looking for ways to prepare
meals that taste good, look good, give you  more
satisfaction than microwaving a store bought frozen dinner,
but don't require a long time in the kitchen, this section
is for you.
BAKED ONION CHICKEN  Serves 4
Recipes don't get much easier on the cook than this.  Anne
Nesbit developed it for Perdue Farms.  One of her jobs as a
Perdue home economist was to translate some of the world's
most successful recipes into ones that were both easy to
assemble and quick to prepare.  "I'm an admirer of simple
recipes," says Anne. "My heart was in this work because I
believed in it.  People want food that looks good and
tastes good, but they don't have time to put a lot of work
into getting there."  I've never met Anne, except over the
phone, but from this comment, I know I would like her. The
recipe isn't fancy, and it may be old-fashioned, but it's a
treasure when you're in a hurry.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
dehydrated onion soup mix
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Roll chicken in dry soup mix, using
about as much mix as you would salt.  Place chicken in a
single layer, skin side up, on baking sheet.  Bake,
uncovered for 55 to 65 minutes until cooked through.
BASIC FRIED CHICKENServes 4
This is fried chicken in its simplest form. It's good
enough so that the last time I made it, the grandchildren
were making off with pieces almost as fast as I could cook
them. Frank's daughter Anne Oliviero particularly
recommends basic fried chicken served cold the next day for
picnics. She and her family love to explore some of the
islands off the coast of Maine, where they live, and cold
fried chicken is just about always on the menu.
1/3 cup flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper or to taste
1 chicken cut in serving pieces
1/2 cup vegetable shortening
In a large plastic bag combine flour with salt and pepper.
Shake chicken in bag with mixture.  In a large, deep
skillet over medium heat, melt shortening.   Cook chicken
uncovered,  heat for 20 to 30 minutes on each side or until
cooked through.
OVEN-FRIED CHICKEN, SOUTHWESTERN STYLE
Any basic fried chicken recipe may be adapted for oven
frying.  It is a useful technique when cooking larger
quantities of chicken and is less messy than stovetop
frying.  (Especially if you have a self-cleaning oven.)
Simply follow the basic cooking instructions as given in
the Southwestern version below.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1 cup buttermilk
3/4 teaspoon Tabasco, optional
Vegetable oil for frying
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup corn meal
1 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
Place chicken in a large bowl.  Sprinkle with Tabasco.
Pour buttermilk over all and allow to marinate for 10 to 15
minutes.  Preheat oven to 425oF.  Place 1/2 inch of oil in
the bottom of a heavy baking pan large enough to hold
chicken without crowding.  Place pan in oven to heat for 10
minutes.  In a plastic bag combine remaining ingredients.
Shake chicken in seasoned flour.  Remove pieces one at a
time and quickly slip into hot oil.  Place in oven and bake
for 20 minutes.  Turn and bake for 10 to 15 minutes longer
or until chicken is cooked through.  Drain chicken on
crumpled paper towels.
BASIC ROAST CHICKENServes 4
Sometimes there is nothing else that will fill the bill
like roasted chicken.  Here's the easiest way to do it.
You can brush the surface with melted butter, margarine or
oil, but it isn't really necessary.
1 whole chicken
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 package (7-1/2-ounces) stuffing mix, prepared as directed
on package
Sprinkle cavity of chicken with salt.  Stuff with favorite
prepared stuffing. Or skip stuffing if you're really in a
hurry. Place chicken in baking pan (no rack needed).
ROASTING CHART

Approximate                      Additional Cooking

Cooking Time    Amount of       Time if Stuffed time

at 350F        Stuffing        if Stuffed
Broiler/Fryer   1-1/4 to 2 hours        1-1/2 to 2 cups 15
to 20 minutes
(2-1/2 to 4 pounds)
Oven Stuffer Roaster    2-1/4 to 2-3/4 hours    3 to 3-
1/2 cups        20 to 25 minutes
(5 to 7 pounds)
Cornish Game Hen        60 to 75 minutes        1/2 to 3/4 cup  15
to 20 minutes
(18-24-ounces)

BIRD OF PARADISEServes 4
The recipe calls for a chicken cut in serving pieces, but
naturally you can substitute any parts that you
particularly like, such as breasts or thighs. Three breasts
or 6 thighs with drumsticks attached would come out to
about the same amount as the 1 chicken called for in this
recipe.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 cup sherry
Season chicken with salt and pepper.  In a shallow bowl
combine egg and milk.  Place cheese in a shallow baking
pan.  Dip chicken in egg mixture; then roll in cheese.  In
a large, deep skillet, over medium heat, melt butter.  Add
chicken and brown for 5 to 6 minutes on each side.  Add
sherry.  Cover and cook at medium-low heat for 35 to 45
minutes or until cooked through.
CORN CRISPED CHICKENServes 4
I grew up on this recipe. It's not new, but it's good and
the preparation time is minimal. If you don't have
cornflakes, you can substitute almost any breakfast flakes
as long as they don't have raisins in them. (The raisins
can scorch in the oven.) For variation, you can add 1
teaspoon dried italian seasonings or 1 teaspoon chili
powder or 3/4 teaspoon curry powder to the cornflake
crumbs.
1 cup cornflake crumbs
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup evaporated milk, undiluted
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
Preheat oven to 350oF.  On a sheet of wax paper combine
cornflake crumbs, salt and pepper.  Place evaporated milk
in a shallow bowl.  Dip chicken in milk; then roll in
seasoned crumbs.  Place chicken, skin side up, in a baking
pan.  Bake, uncovered for 1 hour, or until cooked through.

CUTLET PAILLARDS WITH BASIL BUTTERServes 4
When I made this recipe, I happened to be in a hurry, and
didn't have time to get fresh basil so I used dried basil
instead.  Frank liked it and had seconds. The name
"Paillard," by the way, comes from a European restaurant
famous at the end of the 19th Century.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster        breast
1 tablespoon olive or vegetable oil
6 tablespoons butter or margarine
3 tablespoons minced fresh basil, or 1 tablespoon dried
1 small clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon lemon juice
salt and ground pepper to taste
lemon slices, for garnish
Place chicken between sheets of plastic wrap and pound to
1/2 inch thickness.  If using thin sliced boneless Roaster
breast, omit placing in plastic wrap and pounding. Brush
cutlets lightly with oil,  Grill over hot coals 3 to 4
minutes per side, rotating to form crosshatch marks
characteristic of paillards, or broil 3 to 4 minutes per
side or until cooked through.  Place butter, basil, garlic
and lemon juice in a small pan and melt on the side of the
grill.  Spoon butter over paillards and season with salt
and pepper.  Garnish with lemon slices.
EASY OVEN CHICKENServes 4
This recipe has been one of my favorites since college
days.  The true chicken flavor comes out with just a touch
of garlic.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 small clove garlic, minced
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a shallow baking pan arrange
chicken in a single layer, skin side up.  Pour oil over
chicken.  Sprinkle with salt, pepper and garlic.  Bake,
uncovered, for about 1 hour, or until cooked through.

HONEY LEMON CHICKENServes 4
This recipe was originally designed for broiling, but this
version requires less attention. 1 chicken, cut in serving
pieces
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a shallow baking pan arrange
chicken in a single layer, skin side down.  In a small bowl
combine honey, lemon juice and salt.  Pour half of this
sauce over chicken.  Bake, covered for 30 minutes.  Remove
cover; turn chicken.  Pour other half of sauce on chicken.
Replace cover.  Bake another 25 to 30 minutes or until
cooked through, removing cover last 10 minutes for
browning.
HONEY-MUSTARD BAKED BREASTServes 4
Have you ever been concerned about whether the honey you
have in your cupboard is fresh or whether it should be
thrown out?  Not to worry!  Honey is itself a natural
preservative and samples of honey have been found in the
tombs of Ancient Egypt that were still edible.  If it's
crystallized, it may look bad, but it's still a wholesome
food.  Just heat it gently until it reliquifies.
1 whole boneless roaster breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
4 tablespoons melted butter or margarine
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Season breast with salt and pepper.
Combine butter, honey, mustard and curry powder.  Spoon
half of sauce into a shallow baking dish.  Add breast and
turn to coat well.  Bake, uncovered, for about 1 hour or
until cooked through.  Turn and baste with remaining sauce
once during cooking time.

IT'S A DILLY CHICKEN
When I read this recipe in the files, I noticed several
hand-scrawled notes saying that it was really good, and
someone described it as "a dilly of a recipe."  Yet from
reading the recipe, it didn't sound as special as the notes
indicated, especially since the ingredients include canned
mushrooms rather than fresh. I was curious enough that I
went to the kitchen and made the recipe, expecting that
this would be one of the recipes that I wouldn't include in
this book.  But to my surprise, I discovered that yes, dill
seed and canned mushrooms, along with the juice from the
mushrooms, really do something terrific for chicken.  It's
not rich or creamy, but there's an attractive, aromatic
flavor that permeates the chicken.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 can (4-ounces) whole small mushrooms (with liquid)
1/2 teaspoon dill seed
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a shallow baking pan arrange
chicken, skin side up, in a single layer.  Add salt,
pepper, mushrooms (with liquid from can) and dill.  Cover
with foil.  Bake at  for 1 hour or until cooked through.

KIWI GLAZED CORNISH HENSServes 2
Kiwifruit is only sweet and mild when it's fully ripe. A
kiwifruit grower told me that kiwifruits are ripe when
they're "soft as a baby's bottom."  When they're underripe,
they taste like something between a lemon and a crabapple.
If your kiwifruit is hard when you bring it home, give it a
couple of days to ripen on your kitchen counter.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 tablespoon sugar
1 ripe kiwifruit, peeled and mashed
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Remove giblets.  Season hens inside
and out with salt and pepper.  Tie legs together, fold
wings back and arrange in baking pan.  In a small saucepan
over medium-low heat, melt butter.  Brush hens with 2
tablespoons butter, reserving remainder. Put hens in oven,
and while they are cooking, prepare kiwi glaze.  Add sugar
to remaining butter in pan and heat over medium-low until
sugar dissolves.  Add mashed kiwi and cook one minute.
Remove from heat.  After 45 minutes of cooking time, brush
hens generously with kiwi glaze.  Continue baking for 15 to
20 minutes or until juices run clear with no hint of pink
when thigh is pierced.

FAMILY FAVORITES
In contrast to the preceding recipes, these recipes have
more ingredients and require more preparation time, but if
you've got the time, they're worth it. If you want to
minimize time in the kitchen using these recipes, here are
some suggestions.
Tips for Saving Time in the Kitchen

_To halve baking time, select boneless chicken
breasts.  Cooking time  is  only 15-20 minutes at 350oF. A
bone-in breast takes 35-45 minutes.

_Stir fry chicken can be done in as little as 4
minutes.

_Cook double batches and freeze the extras in serving
size packages.  On days when time is short, pop a package
into the microwave for "fast food."

_Take advantage of your supermarket's time-saving
convenience items. If you're in a hurry, don't bother to
slice and chop your fresh ingredients.  The salad bar has
probably done it for you.  You can also find time savers
such as shredded cheese and frozen chopped onion. (The
supermarket industry has watched restaurants and fast food
stores take more and more of your food dollars away each
year.  They're now doing everything they can think of to
reverse this trend and make supermarket shopping so
attractive, quick, convenient and economical that you'll
want to cook at home.)

_Learn to cook chicken in the microwave.  A pound of
broiler parts that would take 40 minutes in a 350 degree
oven takes only 6-10 minutes in the microwave. See Chapter
Four, Chicken in the Microwave.

SOUPS

PHOTO:  Pot of soup with fresh vegetables surrounding
outside - 2

Wherever there are people and chickens, there are
chicken soups.  Virtually every immigrant group arriving in
America brought along favorite chicken soup recipes and
often the treasured family soup pot, too.

If you grew up on canned, frozen, and dried soups, you
may not realize how easy it is to make truly wonderful
soups at home.  If so, try it for yourself, perhaps with
these American classics.  All the soups are based on a key
ingredient:  rich, homemade chicken stock, made from either
whole birds or from parts, in about three hours.  Stock
takes little tending, just slow easy cooking to bring out
all the flavor and wholesome goodness.  Why not try making
one of these soups now?  And then, with the help of your
freezer, enjoy the results many times in the coming months.
Basic Guide to Chicken Soup

_Older, larger birds, such as the 5-7 pound roasters,
make the best soups. An older bird will have developed more
of the rich, intense chickeny flavor than the younger,
milder-flavored broilers or Cornish hens. I've made soup
from broilers and while it wasn't bad, it wasn't as good as
it could be.

_Use roaster parts if you want to save time.  They
cook faster and are excellent when you need only a small
amount of broth.  The richest flavor, by the way, comes
from the muscles that are exercised most, which happen to
be the dark meat muscles. All parts will make satisfactory
soup, but the legs, thighs and necks provide the fullest
flavor.

_For clear, golden broth, do not add liver.  It turns
stock cloudy.  And avoid a greenish cast by using only
parsley stems and the white parts of leeks or scallions.

_As the stock cooks down, foam will float to the top.
Skim it off, or strain it out through double cheesecloth
when the stock is complete.  Tie herbs and greens in
cheesecloth as a "bouquet garni," so you won't
inadvertently remove them during the skimming.

_Always simmer stock over low to medium heat. It's not
a good idea to boil the stock for the same reason it's not
a good idea to boil coffee; too much of the flavor would
boil away into the air. _Leftover vegetables and those past
their prime are good pureed in cream soups.  When
thickening such recipes with egg, prevent curdling by
stirring a cup of hot soup first into egg, then back into
soup. Also, be careful to keep the soup from boiling once
you've added the egg.

_Most soups develop better flavor if you'll store
them, covered, in the refrigerator for a day or two.  To
seal in the flavor while you're storing the soup, don't
remove the fat that's on top.  When you're ready to serve
the soup you can lift the congealed fat off as a sheet.  To
remove the last particles of fat, place unscented paper
towel on the surface.  Draw towel to one side and remove.

_When freezing stock, allow 1/2- to 1-inch head room
in containers so soup can expand.  Freeze some in quart-
sized or larger containers for use in soups.  Ladle the
rest into ice cube trays or muffin cups for adding to
vegetables, sauces, or gravies.  Freeze and then transfer
frozen stock cubes to a plastic bag or freezer container
and keep frozen until ready to use.

_Soup may be stored in the refrigerator two or three
days or frozen for three to four months. When reheating,
make sure to bring the broth to a boil.  Soups enriched
with eggs are, unfortunately, not good candidates for
reheating; they're apt to curdle.
BASIC CHICKEN STOCK
Makes about 8 cups
If you need to, you can make the following substitutions
for the roaster:  1 stewing hen or spent fowl (5-7 pounds);
2 fresh young chickens (2-4 pounds); or 6 pounds fresh
chicken parts, preferably dark meat portions.  (As I
mentioned earlier, young chickens will not provide  as rich
a flavor as the older birds but the taste will still be
good.)  Cooking times for meat will vary from 3 hours for
stewing hens or spent fowl,  to 1-1/2 hours for 2 smaller
birds to slightly less time for parts.  In each case, time
from beginning of simmer and return bones to stock for an
additional 1/2 hour after you've removed the meat.
     Chicken stock is delicious served as a simple broth
with herbs, shredded or julienne vegetables, slivers of
meat, or rice.  It also is the base from which countless
other soups are made.
1 roaster (5-7 pounds)
chicken giblets, except liver
1 large bay leaf
2 whole cloves
1 teaspoon white peppercorns
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
4 quarts water or enough to cover chicken generously
1 cup dry white wine, optional
2 medium onions, quartered
2 large carrots, sliced
2 ribs celery, sliced
1 leek, white part only, cleaned and sliced, optional
1 bunch fresh parsley, stems only
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
Remove giblets from roaster and discard bird-watcher
thermometer, if it has one.  Place roaster along with
giblets in a large stockpot (8 to 10 quarts) or other large
sauce pot.  Wrap bay leaf, cloves, peppercorns, and thyme
in cheesecloth as bouquet garni; tie closed with string.
Add to stockpot along with remaining ingredients.  Cover
pot and simmer over medium-low heat for 2-1/2 hours or
until meat is tender.  Carefully skim stock from time to
time with a ladle or spoon to remove fat particles and
foam.
To check roaster for doneness, pull back a leg or cut into
meat close to bone; it is cooked when no pink color remains
in meat.  Remove pieces with a slotted spoon.  Cut away
meat from bones and return bones to stock; simmer 30
minutes longer. (See  Chapter 10: Cooking with Leftovers
for uses for the cooked meat.)
Strain stock through a fine sieve.  If you want, prepare in
advance to this point and refrigerate or freeze.  Skim off
top fat before using.
To make a soup, bring as much stock as needed to a simmer.
Then follow the soup recipe, adding chicken, vegetables,
thickeners, seasonings, and garnishes.
CHICKEN-IN-EVERY-POT SOUPServes 4-6
For the best flavor, use fresh vegetables, varying them
according to the season. Speaking of fresh vegetables, do
you know how to tell a good carrot?  Look at the "crown,"
(that's the stem end).  If the crown is turning brown or
black or has regrowth visible where the stem was, you've
got a carrot that's been around awhile. If the crown and
shoulders are a bright orange, you've got a nice, fresh
carrot.
1 cup potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
4 cups chicken broth
1/4 cup dry sherry
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup onions, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup carrots, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch sticks
1 cup celery, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch sticks
1 cup fresh or frozen green beans, in 2-inch pieces
2 cups cooked chicken, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch julienne
strips
1 cup zucchini, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch sticks
Place potatoes in a saucepan with enough salted water to
cover.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.  Cook
potatoes 5 minutes; drain, rinse under cold water and set
aside.  In large saucepan over medium-high heat, bring
broth and sherry to a boil.  Season with salt and pepper.
Add onions, carrots, and celery and simmer 5 minutes.  Stir
in green beans and chicken and heat soup to boiling.  Add
zucchini and potatoes and simmer 1 minute longer or until
vegetables are as tender as you like them.
Variation:  Chicken Minestrone
Add 1 cup chopped stewed tomatoes in their juice and 2 cups
cooked, drained fusilli or other pasta and 1/2-cup cooked
kidney beans when adding zucchini and potatoes.  Stir in
1/2-cup grated Parmesan cheese just before serving.  Other
fresh vegetables may be added according to their cooking
times.  Minestrone happens to be one of Frank's favorites,
although he skips the cheese because of its cholesterol.
NEW ENGLAND CHICKEN 'N' CORN CHOWDERServes 4-6
Chowders are thick soups which take their name from the
large French pot used in soup-making called a "chaudiere."
You can use fresh corn in this recipe, but I deliberately
suggested frozen  corn first because frozen corn can
actually taste sweeter and fresher than the fresh corn you
buy at the supermarket. Corn loses 50% of its sweetness in
just 24 hours at room temperature, and it can take days for
corn to get from the fields to the supermarket to your
house. In contrast, frozen corn is rushed from the fields
to the freezer in just a few hours, and once frozen, it
stops losing its sweetness.  Strange as it may seem, with
corn, frozen can taste fresher than fresh.
1/4 pound bacon or salt pork, diced
1 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups peeled potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
1 package (10 ounces) frozen corn or kernels from 2 ears of
corn
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 cup (1/2-pint) heavy cream
Oyster crackers, for garnish
In large saucepan over medium-high heat, saute bacon for 3
minutes until its fat has been rendered.  Add onions and
celery and cook 3 minutes longer.  Stir in broth and bring
to a boil, whisking constantly. Add potatoes and corn,
season with salt and pepper and cook 5 to 10 minutes or
until tender.  Stir in chicken and cream, simmer 3 minutes
and serve with oyster crackers.
Variation:   Shellfish Chowder
Add 1 cup chopped green pepper and 1 cup cooked crab or
shrimp to soup when adding chicken.

HEARTY LANCASTER CHICKEN, VEGETABLE AND DUMPLING SOUP
Serves 4
This is a famous Pennsylvania summer soup made with extra
vegetables for hearty winter eating. You can substitute
noodles for the dumplings, or add crackers, pretzels $ and
some people have told me that even popcorn works.  I'm
skeptical about the popcorn, but if you're feeling
adventurous, give it a try.
6 cups chicken broth
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup parboiled potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 cup parboiled carrots, cut in 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 cup shredded green cabbage
1 cup thinly-sliced leek, white and tender green parts
only, or 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 package (10-ounces) frozen corn kernels from 2 ears of
corn
Knepp
In large saucepan over high heat, bring broth to a boil.
Add other ingredients and reduce heat to low.  Simmer for 3
minutes while making dumplings.
Knepp (Little Dumplings)
1 egg
3/4 cup flour
1/3 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon  minced, fresh parsley, optional garnish
In small bowl, beat egg; stir in flour, water, salt, baking
powder, and nutmeg.  Drop batter by half teaspoons into the
simmering soup.  When dumplings rise to top, stir in
parsley and serve.
Variation:   Chicken Spinach Straciatella
Omit dumplings.  Clean and stem 1/2 pound fresh spinach;
stack and cut into 1/2-inch strips.  Whisk together 2 eggs
with 1/2-cup grated Parmesan cheese.  Stir in spinach with
chicken, then heat soup just to boiling.  Immediately pour
in the egg mixture in a thin stream, while stirring.  The
goal is to end up with thread-like strands of cooked egg.
Cook until soup simmers again; stir gently just before
serving.

STEW FROM BAVARIAServes 4
If you like mild sauerkraut, instead of just draining it,
as the recipe suggests, rinse it in a colander or strainer.
1 roaster boneless breast, cut into bite-size pieces
salt and ground pepper to taste
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 pound sauerkraut, drained
1 can (16 ounces) whole berry cranberry sauce
1 large apple, peeled, cored and sliced
1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)
Season breast pieces with salt and pepper.  In a flame
proof casserole or Dutch oven over medium heat, melt
butter.  Add chicken and onions.  Saute until lightly
browned, about 5 minutes.  In a bowl combine sauerkraut,
cranberry sauce and apples.  Spoon over chicken and onions
and toss gently.  Cover and simmer over medium-low heat for
20 minutes.  Sprinkle with walnuts just before serving.


                                        MAIN DISH RECIPES
RECIPES WITH CHICKEN BREASTS
Unlike women, chickens have only one breast. A single
serving would usually be a breast half.
  The recipes that follow will refer to "breasts" and
"breast halves."  A cutlet is a breast half (or thigh) that
is both skinless and boneless and sometimes has been
pounded to flatten.  A scaloppine is a cutlet sliced almost
in half lengthwise and then opened, like the wings of a
butterfly or a thin slice from a large roaster breast.  To
save time, look for chicken scaloppine which have already
been made for you: the Perdue thin-sliced Oven Stuffer
Roaster Breasts are ready-made scaloppine.

The recipes will also specify whether to use a chicken
breast or a roaster breast. You can interchange them, but
the results will be different.  A roaster has a more
intense flavor and is juicier.  It's also bigger, and
requires longer cooking.
BAKED BREASTS WITH CHEESEServes 4
When the Perdue Oven Stuffer Roasters and Roaster Parts
first came out, Frank used to have recipe cards put in each
one because it was a new product and most people didn't
know how they should be cooked.  The practice was
discontinued once Roasters became well-known.  The woman in
charge of distributing recipes told me that sometimes the
recipes on the cards became family favorites, and when a
person lost one of the family favorite cards, he or she
would actually take the trouble to write to Frank for a
replacement.  I asked how often this happens and learned
that over the years, Frank has received thousands of
letters requesting replacement cards. This is one of the
recipes that people have asked for over and over again.
3 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
1 roaster boneless breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
2 scallions, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley
1 and 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1/2 cup chicken broth
3 tablespoons dry white wine
3/4 cup grated Swiss cheese
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons bread crumbs
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Lightly butter a shallow baking
dish.  Place chicken in baking dish and sprinkle with salt,
pepper, scallions, parsley, and thyme.  In a measuring cup
combine broth and wine and pour over chicken.  Cover and
bake 20 minutes.  In a small bowl combine cheeses and bread
crumbs.  Remove chicken from oven and sprinkle with cheese
mixture.  Dot with remaining butter and place under broiler
until cheese is melted and golden.
BERLINER SCHNITZEL BREASTServes 4
You'll notice that the "hard-cooked" egg in this recipe
isn't called "hard-boiled." The reason is that the egg
producers tell me that it's better never to boil an egg,
but rather to cook it until it's hard in water that's just
below boiling.  If you cook your eggs in boiling water,
they'll end up with an unattractive greenish color where
the yolk meets the white. At lower temperatures, the yolk
will be more tender and won't discolor.
1 roaster boneless breast or a package of thin sliced
boneless roaster breast.
2 eggs
3/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
Ground pepper to taste
1/3 cup flour
1 cup dry breadcrumbs
vegetable oil
6 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons capers, drained
1 hard-cooked egg, finely chopped
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
Separate fillets from breast halves and then cut breast
halves in half, lengthwise. Place breast pieces between
sheets of plastic wrap.  Pound chicken to a 1/4-inch
thickness to form scaloppine.  If using thin sliced breast
skip this step.  In a shallow bowl beat eggs with salt and
pepper.  Place flour and bread crumbs on sheets of wax
paper.  Dredge chicken in flour then dip in egg and coat
with breadcrumbs.    Heat 1/4-inch oil in a large skillet
over medium-high heat.  Add chicken and saute for 3 to 4
minutes per side or until cooked through.  Remove to
serving platter.  Pour oil from skillet and wipe clean.
Add butter to skillet and melt over medium heat.   Add
lemon juice and capers carefully to avoid spatters; pour
over schnitzels.  In a small bowl  toss together hard-
cooked egg and parsley and sprinkle over top.  Serve with
buttered noodles.
BONELESS BREAST PARMESANServes 4
To get the best flavor from the tomatoes, make sure your
supermarket doesn't store them on the chilling shelf and
don't refrigerate them when you bring them home.  Store
them at room temperature and use them soon after you buy
them.
1 roaster boneless breast or thin sliced boneless roaster
breast
1 1/4 teaspoons salt, divided
Ground pepper to taste
2 eggs, beaten
3/4 cup plain bread crumbs
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup flour
1 pound fresh ripe tomatoes, chopped
1 small clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup olive oil, divided
2 tablespoons minced fresh basil or 2 teaspoons dried
Separate fillets from breast halves and then cut breast
halves in half, lengthwise. Place breast pieces between
sheets of plastic wrap and pound to 1/4" thickness to form
scaloppine. If using thin sliced breast, skip the previous
step. In a shallow bowl beat eggs with 3/4 teaspoon salt
and pepper.  Place flour on a sheet of wax paper. On
another sheet of wax paper combine bread crumbs and
Parmesan cheese.  Dredge cutlets in flour, dip in egg and
roll in bread crumb mixture.  Refrigerate while making
sauce.  In a small serving bowl combine tomatoes, garlic,
1/4 cup olive oil, basil and salt and pepper.  In a large
skillet over medium-high heat, heat remaining oil.  Add
chicken and saute for 3 to 4 minutes per side or until
cooked through.  Transfer to a warmed serving dish.  Pass
sauce separately.
BREAST COQ AU VIN                               Serves 4
The famous food writer, Malcolm R. Herbert, tells a story
that I've always loved about coq au vin (chicken in wine).
According to Herbert, a lady lavished praise on Alexander
Dumaine, one of France's outstanding chefs, for his version
of chicken in wine.

"Madam, I'm not satisfied," Dumaine replied.

"But you have been making coq au vin for 30 years,"
the woman protested. "How can you not be satisfied?"

"That, madam, was practice."

According to Herbert, Dumaine's version of coq au vin
uses red wine, white wine, and brandy, and it takes a good
twenty-four hours to prepare.  This version is a lot
simpler, but still very good. The day I made it, I couldn't
find pearl onions or small onions in my local supermarket,
so I used a large white onion, chopped. The pearl onions
would have been prettier, but the taste was fine.
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 roaster breast
1 cup dry red wine
salt and ground pepper to taste
1 sprig each of fresh thyme and rosemary or 1/4 teaspoon
each, dried
1 clove garlic, minced
16 pearl onions, if available, otherwise 8 small white
onions, peeled and      quartered, or 1 large onion, chopped.
1/4 pound fresh mushrooms, quartered
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/4 cup water
2 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled
1 tablespoon fresh minced parsley
In a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, melt butter.  Add
breast and brown on all sides, 12 to 15 minutes.  Add wine,
seasonings, garlic and onions.  Cover and simmer 60
minutes.  Add mushrooms and simmer 10 to 15 minutes longer
or until breast is cooked through.  Drain juices into a
small saucepan; blend cornstarch and water; stir into pan
juices and cook, over medium heat, stirring constantly, one
minute or until sauce thickens and clears.  Carve breast
and serve with wine sauce.  Garnish with crumbled bacon and
parsley.

BREAST WITH APPLE-PECAN STUFFINGServes 4
Make sure that the pecans you use are fresh.  In the shell,
they'll last in a cool dry place for six months.  Shelled
pecans should be kept in the refrigerator, in an air tight
container. If you plan to keep them for longer than half a
year, freeze them.
1 roaster breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
2 cups seasoned breadcrumbs
6 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
1/4 cup hot chicken broth or water
2 apples, peeled, cored and chopped
1/2 cup chopped pecans
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Season breast inside and out with
salt and pepper.  In a bowl, combine breadcrumbs, 4
tablespoons butter, broth, apples and pecans.  Stuff breast
cavity and cover with aluminum foil.  Carefully place
breast, skin side up in roasting pan.  Rub remaining butter
over breast and bake about one hour and 15 minutes until
juices run clear with no hint of pink when pierced.  Remove
stuffing and carve half of breast.
BUTTERMILK PECAN CHICKENServes 4
The pecan halves are more appetizing-looking when you put
them on top of the chicken during the last ten minutes of
baking; the nuts get a delicious-looking brown. I come back
to this recipe when I want something that's never fail.
1 egg
1/2 cup buttermilk
3/4 cup pecan halves, divided
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup ground pecans
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons sesame seed
4 chicken breast halves
1/4 cup oil
In a mixing bowl beat egg with buttermilk.  Chop 1/2 cup of
pecans coarsely, reserving remaining halves for garnish.
On a sheet of wax paper mix together chopped pecans, flour,
paprika, salt, pepper and sesame seed.  Dip chicken pieces
in buttermilk mixture; then pecan mixture.  Pour oil in
shallow baking pan.  Place chicken breasts, skin side down,
in pan and turn to coat with oil; finishing with skin side
up.  Bake, uncovered, at 350oF 45 to 50 minutes, or until
cooked through.  During last 10 minutes of baking, place
reserved pecan halves on top of chicken.

CHICKEN AVOCADO MELT  Serves 4
For years I made it a kind of hobby to ask cookbook authors
and recipe contest winners how they came up with their
recipes. Since I don't invent recipes myself, the people
who create the real winners seem to me as mysterious and
impressive as someone who composes a hit song or writes a
best selling novel.
My favorite example of this is Marge Fortier, who won the
$10,000 Grand Prize at the National Chicken Cooking
Contest.  She didn't do any tinkering, tasting, and
adjusting the way most of us would. No, the complete idea
for her recipe for Chicken Avocado Melt came to her
seemingly out of nowhere.  "I was vacuuming the living
room," she told me, "when all of a sudden, I don't know
how, the complete idea for the finished recipe just came to
me.  She grabbed a pencil and jotted down the entire recipe
on the notepad that she always keeps handy$and won $10,000.
Her recipe calls for chicken breast halves, but you can
simplify things a little if you use
thin sliced boneless roaster breast pieces instead.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster        breast
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 tablespoon water
1/3 cup cornmeal
3 tablespoons cooking oil
1 ripe avocado, peeled, sliced
1-1/2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese
1/2 cup sour cream, divided
1/4 cup sliced scallion greens
1/4 cup chopped sweet red pepper
cherry tomatoes
parsley sprigs
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Pound the chicken to 1/4"
thickness. If using thin sliced breast, skip the previous
step. In a shallow bowl, mix the cornstarch, cumin, garlic,
and salt.  In another bowl mix egg and water.  Place
cornmeal in a third small bowl.  Coat chicken first with
the cornstarch mixture, then with the egg, and finally with
the cornmeal.  (Marge Fortier says, "I always use
cornstarch because it comes out thinner than flour".)
In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Add
chicken and saute for two minutes on each side "to firm up
the crust", then remove pieces to a shallow baking pan.
Before putting cutlets in oven, top them with avocado
slices and sprinkle with cheese.  Bake for 15 minutes or
until cooked through.  Top each chicken breast with sour
cream and a sprinkling of scallions
 and red pepper.  Garnish with cherry tomato halves and
parsley. Serves four.
CHICKEN IN MUSTARD SAUCEServes 4
Home economist Michelle Scicolone developed this recipe for
Perdue, and she has an ultimate compliment for it:  "It's
what I make all the time when I'm cooking at home."  You
get crunchiness and crispness but it's not fried.
According to Michelle, it comes out just fine with any
mustard that you have on hand or any chicken parts you have
around.
1 roaster boneless breast or  thin sliced boneless breast
3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced (2 cups)
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
l tablespoon minced shallot or scallion
l/8 teaspoon ground pepper
l/2 cup  chicken broth
l/4 cup dry white wine
l tablespoon Dijon mustard
Slice breast thinly if using whole breast.  In large
skillet, over medium-high heat,  heat 2 tablespoons oil.
Add breast slices a few at a time, placing them so that
pieces do not touch.  Saute about 2 minutes per side, until
chicken is lightly browned on both sides and cooked
through.  Remove from skillet; keep warm.  Heat remaining
oil.  Add mushrooms, parsley, shallot and pepper.  Stirring
frequently, cook 2 minutes.  Stir in broth and wine; bring
to a boil and cook until liquid is reduced by half (about
1/3 cup).  Reduce heat to low; stir in mustard until well
blended. Spoon over chicken.
HOT PINEAPPLE BREAST                                    Serves 4-6
My teenage son Carlos says he likes this better cold the
next day with a small handful of slivered almonds tossed
over it. Myself, I like it hot, served over rice.
If you have leftover chicken broth (as you probably will if
you're using canned chicken broth), use it as part of the
liquid you use to cook the rice. Also, if you like peppers
to stay a bright green and don't mind if there's still some
crunch to them, add them at the same time that you add the
cornstarch rather than earlier in the recipe. They look
pretty that way and pick up the bright red of the pimentos.
1 roaster boneless breast cut into 1/4" by 2" strips
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 green pepper, cut into strips
1 cup celery, sliced diagonally
1 20-ounce can pineapple chunks, with liquid
3/4 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon fresh tarragon or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 4-ounce can pimento, drained and cut into strips
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
In a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat, melt
butter.  Add chicken and saute for 5 minutes.  Add green
pepper and celery and cook 3 minutes, stirring.  Drain
pineapple, reserving liquid.  Add drained pineapple, 1/2
cup of pineapple juice, broth, onion and tarragon.  Bring
mixture to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 5
minutes.  Blend cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water to make
a smooth paste.  (If you like the sauce quite thick, use an
extra teaspoon of cornstarch.) Add to skillet and continue
to cook, stirring, until thickened.  Add pimento and serve
immediately.
LAYERED CHICKEN (Hawaiian) Serves 6-8
If you have a sweet tooth, this recipe could end up one of
your favorites. Frank likes it a lot. Besides tasting
delicious, it's also quite versatile. Once when I was
making it, I happened to have leftovers of both chicken and
rice, so I substituted them for the first two ingredients
in this recipe. I also omitted the water and pineapple
juice. If you make this substitution in the recipe, you
won't need to bake it, but instead only keep it in the oven
long enough to heat it through. It's not quite as delicious
as the original, but it's still very good. By the way, the
layered arrangement of this dish is typically Hawaiian;
don't stir or mix the ingredients.
8 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
1-1/2 cups quick-cooking rice, uncooked
1 can (3-1/2-ounces) shredded coconut
1 can (20 ounces) pineapple chunks, drained...reserve juice
3/4 cup water
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
4 tablespoons orange marmalade
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
4 tablespoons soy sauce
2-1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
Preheat oven to 350oF. Cut chicken into 1-inch cubes.
Place half of chicken in bottom of large shallow baking
dish.  Arrange rice in layer on top of chicken, then
remaining chicken in layer.  Add layer of coconut; then
layer of pineapple chunks.  Dot marmalade in spaces between
chunks of pineapple.  Mix water, lemon juice and pineapple
juice; pour over layers.  Pour melted butter or margarine
and soy sauce over all.  Sprinkle ginger on top.  Bake,
covered, for 40 minutes or until chicken and rice are done.
Remove cover during last 5 minutes of baking for browning.
LEMON-PARSLEY BREASTServes 4
I have a friend who grows garlic in California who is a
member of the Society of the Lovers of the Stinking Rose.
He says, "The most common misconception about garlic is
that garlic breath is bad breath."  He and his fellow
Lovers of the Stinking Rose believe that on the contrary,
it's mouthwash breath that is unpleasant.  Their slogan is,
"Get rid of mouthwash breath; eat garlic!"  This recipe
probably won't give you either mouthwash breath or garlic
breath, since cooked garlic is quite mild in its effects.
1 roaster boneless breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
4 tablespoons melted butter or margarine, divided
1/4 cup bread crumbs
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
2 tablespoons minced shallots or scallions
1 clove garlic, minced
1 lemon, thinly sliced
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Season breast with salt and pepper.
Pour 3 tablespoons melted butter into a baking dish.  Add
chicken to dish and turn to coat with butter.  In a small
bowl combine bread crumbs, parsley, shallots and garlic and
spoon over chicken.  Drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon
butter.  Top with lemon slices.  Bake 25 to 30 minutes or
until chicken is cooked through.
MARYLAND BREAST OF CHICKENServes 4
This recipe calls for scallions.  If you have trouble
finding scallions, ask for green onions; they're the same
thing.
3/4 cup butter or margarine, divided
1/4 pound fresh crab meat (or frozen, thawed)
1/4 cup thinly sliced scallions
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 teaspoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons fresh breadcrumbs
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 roaster breast
1 tablespoon vinegar
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Melt 2 tablespoons of butter and
toss in a mixing bowl with crab meat, scallions,
horseradish, tomato paste, lemon juice, breadcrumbs and
salt and pepper.  With your forefinger carefully loosen
skin from the neck end  of the chicken breast to form a
pocket, taking care not to detach sides or bottom.  Stuff
crab mixture between breast and skin.  Rub breast with 1
tablespoon butter; sprinkle with salt and pepper and place
in roasting pan.  Bake approximately one hour, until skin
is brown and meat is tender.  Remove to serving platter and
keep warm.  Skim off any fat from drippings; add wine and
vinegar and bring to a boil.  Reduce pan juices to about
1/4 cup and remove from heat.  Whisk in remaining butter,
strain into a sauceboat and serve separately.
QUICK SWEET AND SOUR BREASTServes 4
In most cases, I prefer fresh produce to canned. Tomatoes
are, at times, an exception. If you're buying out-of-season
tomatoes, and if you don't know the source, there's a good
chance that they were picked green and artificially
ripened. One tomato grower told me she'd rather eat cotton
than an out-of-season tomato because the taste was so
disappointing.  There is some good news on the subject,
though.  Tomatoes retain their flavor during canning
exceptionally well, and canned tomatoes are picked vine
ripe.  If you want the next best thing to a vine-ripened
tomato, and it's winter, try canned tomatoes, as suggested
in this recipe.
1 roaster boneless breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
flour
5 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 medium onion, chopped
1 garlic clove, minced
1 medium green pepper, chopped
1 cup canned chopped tomatoes (with liquid)
1 can (8-1/4-ounces)  cubed pineapple (plus 2 tablespoons
pineapple juice from can)
3 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in 3 tablespoons water
Cut roaster breast into 1-inch pieces. Season with salt and
pepper; coat with flour and set aside.  In saucepan, over
medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter and cook onions,
garlic and green pepper for 5 minutes stirring often.  Add
tomatoes, pineapple and juice, ketchup and vinegar.  Stir
and simmer over low heat.  Meanwhile, in a large skillet,
over medium-high heat, melt remaining 3 tablespoons butter.
Saute chicken, half at a time, until golden and cooked
through, about 5 to 7 minutes per batch.  Drain and place
on serving dish.  To sauce in pan, add dissolved
cornstarch; cook, stirring, over high heat until sauce
thickens.  Pour over chicken pieces.
STUFFED BREAST PARMENTIERServes 4
Parmentier, a French food writer from 200 years ago,
popularized the use of potatoes. Before him, people worried
that potatoes might be poisonous.  Today, when the name
"Parmentier" occurs in a recipe, it's a signal that there
will be potatoes in it.
1 roaster breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
1 pound boiling potatoes, unpeeled
1/4 pound bacon, cooked and crumbled
1/2 cup chopped red onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
2 tablespoons dry bread crumbs
1/2 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Season breast inside and out with
salt and pepper to taste.  Boil potatoes in salted water to
cover until just tender, 30 to 45 minutes.  Drain, cool
slightly, peel and cut into 1/2-inch cubes.  Toss with
bacon, onion, celery, bread crumbs, sour cream and salt and
pepper to taste.  Stuff breast and neck cavities with
potato mixture, wrapping exposed stuffing with foil.  Place
chicken breast-side-up in roasting pan.  Rub skin with
butter.  Bake approximately 1-1/2 hours, until tender.
Transfer to serving dish; remove foil and serve.
 RECIPES WITH CORNISH HENS

Have you ever wondered just what a "Cornish game hen"
is?

It's a very young bird, usually about 5 weeks old, as
opposed to a broiler, which is 7 weeks, or a roaster, which
is 12 weeks.  Typically, they're tenderer and slightly
lower in fat than older birds.

All Cornish game hens are very young chickens, but the
Perdue Cornish game hens have something else special about
them. Frank directed the Perdue geneticists to breed the
broadest breasted Cornish hens in the industry.  Like the
Perdue Roasters, the Perdue Cornish have exceptionally
broad breasts.  The ratio of meat to bone is therefore
particularly favorable.
BUFFALO-STYLE CORNISH PIECESServes 2
You can re-use the frying oil called for in this recipe, or
any deep frying recipe, for that matter. As long as you
never heat the oil to the smoking point and as long as you
strain it through cheese cloth to remove any particles of
food, you can use it over and over again. The oil is still
good as long as it retains it's golden color.  When it has
turned a dark brown, it's time to replace it. If you don't
have cheese cloth handy for straining, laundered nylon
stockings make a good substitute.
Creamy Blue Cheese Dressing
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons crumbled blue cheese
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 scallion, thinly sliced
1 small clove garlic, minced
2 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
oil for deep frying
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
2 tablespoons Tabasco
In a small serving bowl prepare dressing by blending
mayonnaise and sour cream.  Stir in blue cheese, parsley,
lemon juice, scallion and garlic.  Chill.  Quarter hens and
remove backbones.  Pat pieces dry with paper towels and
season with salt and pepper.  Heat oil to 375oF  or until a
small cube of bread sizzles when placed in oil. Deep-fry
hens 10 minutes, turning once.  Drain well.  In a small
bowl blend melted butter and hot sauce; brush on chicken
pieces.  Serve warm with Creamy Blue Cheese Dressing.
CORNISH SAUTE WITH SUMMER SQUASHServes 2
To keep the olive oil called for in this recipe in its best
condition, store it in an airtight container in a cool
cupboard away from the light.  It's not necessary to
refrigerate it, and besides cold temperatures will make it
cloudy and difficult to pour.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 medium zucchini, sliced
1 medium yellow squash, sliced
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Halve hens and remove backbones.  Season with salt and
pepper.  In a large skillet, over medium-high heat, heat
oil.  Add hen halves and brown on all sides, 10 to 12
minutes.   Add onion and garlic; saute 3 to 4 minutes.  Add
squash, broth, parsley and lemon juice.  Cover, reduce heat
to medium-low, and cook 15 to 20 minutes or until hens are
cooked through.
GRECIAN HEN SAUTEServes 2
Do you know the easiest way to peel the fresh tomatoes
called for in this recipe?  Place the tomatoes in boiling
water for about 20-40 seconds and you'll find that the skin
slips off quite easily.  The riper the tomato, the quicker
the skin loosens in boiling water.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
1 and 1/2 teaspoon minced, fresh oregano or 1/2 teaspoon
dried
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup white wine
2 ripe tomatoes, peeled and quartered
1/4 pound feta cheese, cut into 1/2" cubes
2 tablespoons ripe olives, sliced
Cut hens into quarters and remove backbones.  In a large
skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add chicken and
brown 5 to 6 minutes per side.  Add garlic, bay leaf,
oregano, salt, pepper and wine.  Cover and simmer over
medium-low heat for 15 minutes.  Add tomatoes and cook 10
minutes.  Stir in cheese and olives.  Cook 5 minutes longer
or until hens are cooked through.  Remove bay leaf before
serving.
HENS NORMANDY WITH APPLESServes 2
If you're not using the apples in this recipe the day you
buy them, store them in the refrigerator.  Apples age five
times faster at room temperature than they do in the
refrigerator so they'll keep fresher longer if you store
them in the refrigerator instead of in a fruit bowl.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
1 tablespoon minced, fresh sage or 1 teaspoon dried
3 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
2/3 cup apple juice
2 Golden Delicious apples, peeled
1/3 cup chicken broth or white wine
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
Season hens inside and out with salt and pepper.  Put 1/2
of sage in each cavity.  Tie legs together and fold wings
back.  Place hens in a flame proof baking pan just large
enough to hold them comfortably.  Brush  with melted
butter.  Add apple juice to baking pan.  Bake at 350oF 30
minutes, basting several times.  Core and quarter apples;
add to pan and baste.  Bake 30 minutes, until hens and
apples are tender, basting several times.  Remove hens and
apples to serving platter; keep warm.  On top of stove,
bring pan drippings to a boil; add broth or wine and cook
until reduced by half.  Stir in cream; cook 2 to 3 minutes
until slightly thickened.  Pour sauce over hens and apples.
Sprinkle with parsley and serve.
WINE-COUNTRY CORNISHServes 4
When you buy (or pick) the tomatoes called for in this
recipe, store them at room temperature rather than in the
refrigerator.  The tomato farmers say that refrigerator
temperatures destroy a tomato's flavor and texture. Try to
use tomatoes soon after you buy them while they're still at
their best.
4 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon flour
1/2 cup dry white wine or vermouth
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh oregano or 1/2 teaspoon dried
Season hens inside and out with salt and pepper.  Fold
wings back and tie legs together.  In a Dutch oven large
enough to hold all 4 Cornish, over medium-high heat, heat
oil.  Brown hens on breast side.  If you don't have a pan
big enough to do four at a time, brown one or two at a
time. Remove hens and reserve.  Add onion and garlic and
saute for 5 minutes.  Stir in flour.  Add remaining
ingredients and season to taste with salt and pepper.
Stir.  Return hens to Dutch oven breast side up, and bring
liquid to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and
simmer for 45 minutes.  Cornish are done when juices run
clear with no hint of pink when thigh is pierced.
RECIPES WITH CHICKEN PIECES
In the early 1970s, 75% of the chicken sold was whole
chicken.  Today it's less than 25%.  If you want to
substitute all legs or all breasts or some other
combination, look at the table in the Introduction, page s
12-13 for a chart showing equivalent amounts of the
different parts.
BATTER FRIED CHICKENServes 4
I bet you can make this in less time than it takes to drive
to the local fast food place and wait in line for service
and drive back again. It should cost a lot less too.
Remember, you can re-use the frying oil many times. Just
don't let it get so hot that it smokes and be sure to
strain it after you've finished with the frying.
1-1/3 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup milk
1 egg, beaten
1 chicken cut in serving pieces
Oil for deep frying
In a mixing bowl combine dry ingredients; add milk and egg
gradually to make batter.  Dip chicken in batter.  In a
deep fryer heat oil to 350oF.  Add chicken and fry for 15
to 25 minutes until cooked through.
BEER AND PRETZELS CHICKEN Serves 4
This dish is at its best when the bacon and pretzels are
finely chopped.  Use your blender or food processor to make
the job easy.
1/3 cup flour
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup beer
1 egg
1/2 cup finely crushed pretzels
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 slices bacon, cooked crisp, crumbled
3 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
1 chicken cut in serving pieces
In a mixing bowl combine flour, paprika, salt, ginger and
pepper.  Add beer and egg; beat with a hand beater to make
smooth batter.  Mix crushed pretzels, Parmesan cheese,
bacon and parsley in a large plastic bag.  Dip chicken
pieces one a time in batter; then place in bag with pretzel
mix and shake to coat.  Place coated chicken pieces in
shallow baking pan, skin side up.  Bake, covered, at 350oF
for 30 minutes.  Remove cover.  Continue baking, uncovered,
about 30 minutes longer or until chicken is cooked through.
CAPITAL CHICKEN Serves 4
This is rather highly seasoned dish. Your family might
prefer it with a little less ginger--but then again, maybe
they'll love it this strong.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon flour
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1/2 cup rose wine
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup oil
1/4 cup water
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Place chicken in single layer, skin
side up, in shallow baking pan.  In a mixing bowl combine
remaining ingredients and pour over chicken.  Bake,
uncovered for about 1 hour or until cooked through, basting
occasionally.
CHICKEN ORANGE-ANO              Serves 4
When you're making this recipe, what if you find that your
brown sugar has hardened into a brick and you can't measure
it anymore?  I used to take a hammer and wallop it and then
use the pieces. But then a sugar cane producer told me that
a short term emergency solution is to heat the sugar at 250
degrees in the oven until it softened. The advantage of
this is that it works.  The disadvantage is that whatever's
left is twice as hard once it cools. You can re-heat it
again, but it gets more brick-like with each heating.
1/3 cup flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 can (6-ounces) frozen orange juice concentrate
1 can (6-ounces) water
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
In a large plastic bag, combine flour salt and pepper.  Add
chicken pieces and shake to coat.  In a large skillet over
medium heat, melt butter.  Add chicken pieces and brown for
12 to 15 minutes per side.  Remove chicken and reserve.
Pour off and discard butter from skillet.  Add remaining
ingredients and stir to combine.  Return chicken to
skillet.  Cover and cook over low heat for about 1/2 hour,
turning chicken several times until cooked through.
FRUIT AND NUT CHICKENServes 4
Inflation hits all of us, but in this recipe, you'll find
one ingredient has come down in price over the years.  In
fact, it's come down spectacularly.  In Roman times,
raisins weren't just expensive, they were money.  You could
buy a young slave for 2 amphora (jars) of raisins.
2 tablespoons oil
1 chicken cut in serving pieces
1-1/2 cups orange juice
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup golden raisins
1/2 cup slivered almonds
In a large skillet over medium heat, heat oil.  Add chicken
and brown for 12 to 15 minutes per side.  Pour orange juice
over chicken.  Sprinkle salt, cinnamon, pepper, raisins and
almonds on top.  Cover and simmer for approximately 30
minutes or until cooked through.
OVEN BARBECUED CHICKENServes 4
This isn't new or unique, but it's good. Of course, you can
always use your favorite prepared barbecue sauce if you
prefer.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup chili sauce
1/4 cup vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons oil
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Place chicken in single layer, skin
side up, in shallow baking pan.  In a mixing bowl combine
remaining ingredients and pour over chicken.  Bake,
uncovered, for about 1 hour, or until cooked through.
PHOTO:  Drumsticks in bowl of rice - bread & glass of wine
- 3
RECIPES WITH GROUND CHICKEN
Ground Chicken is a perfect substitute for ground beef in
dishes such as spaghetti, chili, meatloaf, lasagna or even
plain burgers.  And ground chicken has fewer calories and
less fat than ground beef. It will vary according to the
individual manufacturer's formulations, but ground chicken
usually averages 60% less fat than the U.S. Department of
Agriculture standard permits for regular ground beef.
(Regular ground beef is about 30% fat.)

I was surprised to learn that there's actually a
double standard for the beef industry and the poultry
industry when it comes to describing fat content.  Beef can
be classified as "lean" at 22.5% fat, while chicken is only
"lean" if it contains 10% or less fat.

I was also surprised to learn how complicated it is to
make ground chicken. If I weren't connected with the
industry, I would have thought that to get ground chicken,
you just put it in a grinder the way you do to get
hamburger, and that would be it.  Ah, but it's not so!  The
fibers of chicken meat are shorter and more delicate than
beef. To get the right texture took a full year of
experimentation and fine tuning at Perdue. The skilled and
knowledgeable food scientists working on the project had to
discover which parts of the bird tasted best in hamburger,
what size holes the meat should be forced through in the
grinding machine, what temperature would be best, and so
on.  A difference of a mere 2 degrees in the meat's
temperature meant the difference between a desirable
texture and one that was merely passable.

I remember when the food scientists were first
developing the ground chicken, that hundreds of people,
including me, were involved in the taste testings.  I also
remember the first time Frank and I tried ground chicken
outside of the laboratory.  It happened at a barbecue at
his son's house. Jim and Jan Perdue had chicken hamburgers
and beef hamburgers grilling side by side, and Frank beamed
like a kid with a new toy when he saw how the chicken
burgers stayed plump and didn't shrink.  Meanwhile the
hamburgers, being 20% fat, were dwindling into hockey
pucks.
Basic Cooking Guide for Burgers:
Saute:  Shape one package fresh ground chicken into
patties.  Saute in a small amount of oil over high heat, 1
to 2 minutes on each side to brown.  Reduce heat to medium
and continue to cook 5 to 6 minutes on each side until
thoroughly cooked and springs back to the touch.
Broil:  Shape one package fresh ground chicken into
patties.  Broil on a rack 4-inches from heat 5 to 6 minutes
on each side until thoroughly cooked and springs back to
the touch.
Grill:  Shape one package fresh ground chicken into
patties.  Place burgers on hottest area of lightly oiled
grill 1 to 2 minutes on each side to brown.  Move burgers
toward the outside of the grill and continue to cook 5 to 6
minutes on each side until thoroughly cooked and springs
back to the touch.
CHICKEN STROMBOLI        Serves 4
I've had this at a restaurant, made with bread dough, but I
liked it better using this recipe with pie crust dough.
The day I made it, I was late (as usual), and took a short
cut: I used prepared pie crusts, the kind that come frozen
and already shaped in aluminum pie pans.
2 tablespoons olive oil
1-1/2 cups thinly sliced onion
1 large green pepper, thinly sliced
1 package (about 1 pound) fresh ground chicken
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon salt
1 prepared recipe pie crust mix
2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add
onion and pepper and saute 3 to 5 minutes.  Add chicken,
tomato paste and seasonings and cook 8 to 10 minutes until
chicken is cooked through.  Preheat oven to 375oF.  Roll
out prepared pie crust into a round 1/8 inch thick.  Cut
circle in quarters to form 4 wedge shaped pieces.    Place
1/4 of filling on the wide rounded end of each wedge; fold
in sides and roll up.  Place stromboli seam-side down on
baking sheet, brush with butter and bake 30 minutes until
pastry is lightly browned.
CHICKEN BURGERS BORDELAISEServes 4
These are good just as they are, but I've also found that
they're wonderful made into little cocktail sized meat
balls to pass during parties. By the way, at one of my
parties, I tried to determine whether it was better to use
the  maximum amount of pepper and mustard in this recipe or
the minimum. Some guests liked the meat balls highly
seasoned, and others preferred them mild, so I guess one
isn't better than the other; it's just what your family or
guests like.
1 package (about 1 pound) fresh ground chicken
1 to 1-1/2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper
1 tablespoon vegetable oil (optional)
1-1/4 cups red wine
1/4 cup minced shallots or scallions
1 tablespoon sugar
2-3 teaspoons  Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 to 2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
Form chicken into 4 burgers.  Press pepper into both sides.
In a large, non-stick skillet, over medium-high heat, heat
oil.  Add burgers and brown for 2 minutes on each side.
Salt burgers lightly and reduce heat to medium-low.
Continue cooking 5 to 6 minutes per side until thoroughly
cooked through.  While burgers are cooking, combine wine,
shallots, sugar, mustard and thyme in a saucepan.  Cook
over high heat 5 to 6 minutes until liquid is reduced to
3/4 cup.  Remove burgers from skillet and keep warm.  Add
wine mixture to skillet and stir over medium heat to
combine with pan juices.  Whisk in butter and parsley.
Spoon sauce over burgers and serve.

RECIPES WITH THIGH & DRUMSTICKS
 If you haven't liked dark meat up until now, try these
recipes with an open mind.  Thigh meat, drumsticks, or the
meat from any well-exercised muscle, has more flavor and is
apt to be juicier.  If Frank were going by taste alone and
forgetting about calories, he would always choose thigh
meat.
 I was present at a taste testing at Perdue when Teri
Benson, a Food Technician, asked the dozen or so
participants to rate the flavor of various parts of a
chicken.  The chicken was ground and fried in patties so
none of us could identify which parts we were eating.  We
also couldn't be influenced by what our neighbors thought
because each patty was coded and the breast meat or the
thigh meat on my plate was in a different position from
what they'd be on my neighbor's plate.  The test was
replicated with many different groups, but the results were
fairly uniform: people prefer the flavor and juiciness of
thigh meat.  Try a few of these recipes; you may discover
some new family favorites.
WALDORF SALADServes 4
You could use other apples in this recipe, such as Red
Delicious or Granny Smith, but the McIntosh with its
characteristic crispness, juiciness, and mildly tart flavor
works particularly well in this recipe.  You can tell a
McIntosh by its two-toned red and green skin.
1 quart chicken broth
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup celery, thinly sliced
1 to 2 McIntosh apples, unpeeled in 1/2-inch cubes (about 1
cup)
1/2 cup walnut halves
1 head Bibb or Boston lettuce
In a 2 quart saucepan over medium heat, bring chicken broth
to a boil.  Add chicken and simmer over low heat for 30
minutes, uncovered.  Drain thighs and cut into bite-size
pieces.  Reserve broth for other use.  In a mixing bowl
blend together lemon, mustard, oil, parsley, and salt and
pepper.  Toss warm chicken with sauce and allow to cool.
Toss with remaining ingredients and serve on beds of Bibb
or Boston lettuce.
DRUMSTICKS WITH HERB SAUCEServes 2
When serving this recipe, take a tip from Bev Cox, a woman
who not only is responsible for many of my favorite Perdue
recipes over the years, but who is also famous for being
one of the best food stylists around. She likes to have the
garnishes mirror the seasonings, so if she had, for
example, this chicken recipe with basil in it, she'd be apt
to garnish it with fresh basil. She also believes that
garnishes should be edible.  These chicken drumsticks with
new potatoes and green beans would be a simple dinner, but
sprinkle the new potatoes with chopped chives, stick a red
pepper ring around the green beans and you have something
that looks special as well as tastes special.
5 roaster drumsticks
salt and ground pepper to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons olive oil
Sauce:
1/4 cup minced fresh basil, or 1 tablespoon dried
1/4 cup minced, fresh parsley
1/4 cup thinly sliced scallions
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon, or 1 teaspoon dried
1 tablespoon capers
1/4 cup olive oil
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Place drumsticks in a baking pan
and season with salt and pepper.  In a small bowl combine
garlic and olive oil and baste drumsticks generously.  Bake
drumsticks for 60 to 75 minutes until tender and cooked
through, turning and basting once.  Meanwhile, in a bowl
make sauce by whisking together remaining ingredients.
Serve drumsticks, passing sauce separately.
DRUMSTICKS ZINGARAServes 2
The word "zingara" is from a French sauce with mushrooms,
ham, and truffles. In this version, I've skipped the
truffles.
5 roaster drumsticks
3/4 cup (3-ounces) minced fresh mushrooms
3/4 cup (1/4 pound) minced ham
1/2 cup minced shallots or scallions
3 tablespoons Madeira or brandy, divided
1 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh tarragon, or 1/2 teaspoon
dried
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened, divided
salt and ground pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Pull back the skin of each
drumstick and cut lengthwise slits in the meat in 4 places.
Pull skin back into place  In a mixing bowl, combine
mushrooms, ham, shallots, 1 tablespoon Madeira, tarragon, 3
tablespoons butter and salt and pepper.  Stuff mixture
under the skin of each drumstick and secure with
toothpicks.  Melt remaining butter and baste drumsticks.
Bake for 60 to 75 minutes or until tender and cooked
through.  Remove to a serving platter and remove
toothpicks.  To drippings in pan, add 2 tablespoons Madeira
and bring to a boil, stirring.  Pour sauce over drumsticks.

CHILI THIGHS RELLENOS
If you're making this recipe and you're not sure how old
the eggs you have in your refrigerator are, the chances are
that they're still good.  As long as they're clean, dry,
have been kept cold and have no cracks, and weren't cooked,
they'll last for months in your refrigerator and still be
suitable for cooking in dishes like this. Eggs that are
several months old won't have the quality of a perfectly
fresh egg, and I wouldn't use them for frying, but they're
still edible. Do be sure they've been kept cold and have no
cracks and are clean.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1 can (4-ounces) whole, mild green chilies, seeded
1 egg, beaten
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 can (8-ounces) tomato sauce
1/2 cup shredded Monterey Jack Cheese
Open thighs and lay flat.  Divide chilies in four equal
amounts and place in the center of each thigh.  Roll up and
secure with toothpicks.  In a shallow bowl, combine egg and
salt and pepper to taste.  Dip thighs in egg and roll in
bread crumbs.  Refrigerate 15 minutes.  In a large skillet,
over medium heat, melt butter with oil.  Add thighs and
cook, turning, 10 to 12 minutes or until brown on all
sides.  Spoon tomato sauce over thighs.  Reduce heat to
medium-low reduce heat and cover.  Cook for 20 minutes or
until thighs are cooked through.  Sprinkle with cheese;
cover and cook 2 minutes longer.
INDONESIAN STIR-FRY THIGHSServes 4
This recipe originally called for much more ginger, but I
like a milder flavor, so I reduced it.  You may want to
increase the amount suggested here if you like highly
seasoned food. To store fresh ginger, keep it in the
refrigerator in a plastic bag along with a dampened paper
towel to keep it from drying out.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
1/3 cup soy sauce, divided
3 tablespoons molasses
3 tablespoons rice wine or white distilled vinegar
2 teaspoons minced, fresh ginger or to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes or ground pepper
pinch ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 cup carrots, cut in match stick strips
1 cup peeled cucumber, halved, seeded and cut into match-
stick strips
1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions
Cut thighs into 1/8-inch strips.  In a wok or large skillet
over medium-high heat, heat oil. Add chicken and stir-fry
for 2 minutes  Add 4 tablespoons soy sauce, molasses,
vinegar, seasonings, garlic and ginger; bring to a boil.
Cover, reduce heat to medium-low and steam chicken 5
minutes, stirring once, until tender.  In a small bowl
dissolve cornstarch in remaining soy sauce and reserve. Add
carrots and steam, covered, 2 minutes.  Stir in cucumber,
scallions and cornstarch mixture and stir until liquid
comes to a boil.  Serve over hot fluffy rice.
ISLAND THIGHSServes 4
One of the best money-saving tips I know for buying food is
one you can use in this recipe.  A Pennsylvania mushroom
grower told me that when you see slightly browned mushrooms
on sale$and they're often a fraction of the price of the
cosmetically perfect mushrooms$buy them. The mushroom
flavor will be more intense since the mushrooms are older;
they'll have dried slightly so you won't be paying as much
for water; and you won't see the discolorations anyway if
you're using the mushrooms for cooking.  I've tried his
recommendation many times, and I think he's right.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
3 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms (4 ounces)
1 cup thinly sliced scallions
1 cup chicken broth
1-1/2 cups fresh snow peas or 1 package (6 ounces) frozen
snow peas, thawed
3/4 cup seedless, green grapes, halved
2 teaspoons slivered lemon peel
1 teaspoon minced, fresh ginger, or 1/4 teaspoon ground
Cut thigh cutlets into 1/4" by 2" strips. Toss with
cornstarch to coat well.  In a wok or large skillet, over
medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add chicken and saute until
browned on all sides, 3 to 4 minutes.  Add mushrooms and
scallions.  Saute, stirring until mushrooms are golden,
about 1 minute.  Stir in remaining ingredients.  Cook,
stirring, until sauce is thickened and smooth.  Reduce heat
and simmer 1 to 2 minutes.  Serve over rice.
POJARSKI STYLE THIGHSServes 4
Pojarski style dishes use ground meat. They are typically
made from beef, veal, salmon, or chicken.  One of the most
famous Pojarski dishes is salmon shaped to look like a pork
chop.  Doing the same thing with chicken tastes and looks
delicious and costs a lot less.
1 package fresh ground chicken (about 1 pound)
1/2 cup sour cream, divided
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 cup flour
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms (4 ounces)
2 tablespoons minced fresh dill or parsley
Mix ground chicken with 1/4 cup sour cream, plus salt and
pepper to taste.  Cover and refrigerate 15 minutes.  Form
mixture into four "chop" shaped cutlets and coat each
lightly with flour.  In a large skillet over medium heat,
melt butter.  Add cutlets and saute for 7 to 8 minutes on
each side until lightly browned and cooked through.  Remove
to a serving dish and keep warm.  Add mushrooms to skillet
and saute 2 to 3 minutes.  Add remaining sour cream and mix
well.  Spoon sauce over cutlets.  Sprinkle with fresh dill.
STIR-FRIED THIGHS WITH BEANSPROUTSServes 4
Stir frying isn't more difficult than regular frying, but
one big difference is that the pan is kept hotter than
would be usual for American-style frying.  To tell if it's
hot enough, place your frying pan$or wok if you have
one$over high heat. The pan or wok is hot enough if a drop
of water dropped onto it sizzles and then evaporates.  Add
the oil, and let the oil heat until it's almost at the
smoking point. When adding the ingredients, stir them
constantly until done.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 egg white, slightly beaten
salt to taste
2 to 3 tablespoons peanut oil, as needed
1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced
1 red, sweet, bell pepper, cut into thin strips
1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions
1/4 pound (2 cups) snow peas, sliced diagonally
1/2 pound (4 cups) beansprouts, washed and drained
1/4 cup soy sauce
few drops Tabasco, to taste
Cut thighs into 1/4" strips.  In a shallow bowl, combine
cornstarch, egg white and salt.  Add chicken, turning to
coat well.  Cover and refrigerate one hour.  In a wok or
large skillet over high heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil.  Add
thighs and garlic and stir-fry for 3 minutes.  Remove
chicken and set aside.  Add additional oil to wok, if
necessary.  Add pepper strips and stir-fry one minute.
Remove and set aside.  Add scallions and snow peas and
stir-fry one minute.  Add beansprouts and cook, tossing, 2
minutes.  Return chicken and pepper to wok and toss.  Add
soy sauce and Tabasco.  Heat thoroughly.  Serve over hot
cooked rice.
SWEET AND SOUR THIGHSServes 4
 Cornstarch yields a more transparent sauce, and has
roughly twice the thickening power of flour.  The
transparency makes it appropriate for oriental recipes like
this one.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
2 tablespoons peanut oil
1 1/2 cups sliced green pepper
2/3 cup sliced celery
1/2 cup sliced scallions, stems included
1 can (8-1/2-ounces) sliced water chestnuts, drained
6 ounces fresh or frozen (thawed) snow peas
1 can (8-3/4-ounces) pineapple chunks in syrup
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger or 1/2 teaspoon ground
2 tablespoons vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
Cut thighs into bite size pieces.  In a wok or large
skillet, over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add thigh pieces
and stir-fry 5 minutes.  Add green pepper, celery,
scallions and water chestnuts.  Stir-fry 2 minutes.  Add
snow peas, pineapple and syrup and chicken broth.  Reduce
heat to medium and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often.  In
a small bowl, blend together cornstarch, sugar, ginger,
vinegar and soy sauce.  Add to wok and cook until sauce is
slightly thickened, about 2 minutes.  Serve over hot cooked
rice.
SZECHUAN STIR-FRY THIGHSServes 4
The woman in charge of supervising the entire Perdue recipe
program, says that this is her personal favorite.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
4 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
1 cup carrots, cut into matchstick strips
1/2 cup cashews
1 teaspoon hot chili pepper, finely chopped, or to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup dry sherry
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Cut boneless thighs into strips (about 1/4" x 2").  In a
wok or large skillet over high heat, heat 2 tablespoons
oil.  Add chicken and stir-fry for 2 to 3 minutes.  Remove
chicken and  reserve.  Add remaining 2 tablespoons oil to
wok and add carrots, cashews, chili pepper, garlic and
ginger.  Stir-fry 3 minutes until carrots just begin to
soften.  Return chicken to wok.  In a small bowl blend
together soy sauce, sherry and cornstarch.  Add to wok and
cook, stirring constantly, until sauce boils and thickens.
Serve over hot cooked rice.
THIGH CHILIServes 4
This is a healthy, low-cholesterol chili.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 large garlic clove, minced
1 green pepper, seeded and chopped
1 can (16-ounces) tomatoes, chopped, with liquid
1 can (16-ounces) kidney beans, drained
1 tablespoon chili powder
salt and ground pepper to taste
Tabasco, to taste
Cut chicken into bite size pieces. In a Dutch oven over
medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add chicken, onion, garlic and
green pepper and cook, stirring until chicken loses its
pink color.  Add remaining ingredients and stir.  Simmer,
covered, over medium-low heat for 30 minutes or until
chicken is tender.  Adjust seasonings according to taste.
THIGH FLAUTASServes 4
You can tell if your avocado for the guacamole in this
recipe is ripe by whether it yields to gentle pressure when
you hold it between your palms.  If there's some "give" to
it, it's ripe.  If it feels hard, like a baseball, it's not
ripe. Wait a few days, and it will have a richer, creamer
texture and flavor. You can speed the ripening by keeping
the avocado in a paper bag, at room temperature, along with
a banana or pear or apple. These fruits give off a ripening
factor and the paper bag concentrates the ripening factor.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1 quart chicken broth
1/2 pound Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese, coarsely grated
(about 2 cups)
1/4 cup red or green chili salsa
salt to taste
8 flour tortillas
Vegetable oil, for frying
1/3 cup sour cream, optional
Guacamole:
1 large ripe avocado
1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice
1/2 cup chopped tomato
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon red or green chili salsa
In a large saucepan over medium-high heat bring chicken
broth to a boil.  Add boneless thighs, reduce heat to
medium-low and simmer, uncovered, 30 minutes.  Remove
thighs, reserving broth for other use.  Shred meat and
place in a mixing bowl.  Toss with 1-1/2 cups cheese,
salsa, and salt to taste.  Divide mixture among tortillas
and roll up, securing with a toothpick, if necessary.  In a
large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat, heat 1/2-inch
oil.  Fry flautas in hot oil, turning to brown lightly on
all sides.  Transfer to serving dish and keep warm.  To
make guacamole, scoop out avocado flesh, chop and toss with
lemon juice.  Combine lightly with remaining ingredients.
Serve flautas topped with guacamole, remaining cheese and
sour cream, if desired.
Chapter Two. Chicken for the Microwave


When I was organizing this chapter, I was tempted to
include all of these microwave recipes in the "Cooking for
Everyday" chapter. After all, the microwave is certainly
becoming part of our everyday life.

The reason I didn't is$well, there are two reasons.
First,  if I put all the microwave recipes in one chapter,
you won't have to waste time hunting for them. Second,
there are a number of tips on using the microwave
successfully, and I thought you might like to have them all
in one place, also.

The microwave is a wonderful convenience, but in my
case, I used to use it for reheating foods or for boiling
water and not much else. Are you the same?  Ah, but there's
so much more to it than that!  Having spent time with the
Perdue food technologists and home economists, and
especially after studying the techniques and recipes from
Rita Marie Schneider, the home economist who developed the
majority of the Perdue microwave recipes, I'm a convert
now. I've come to appreciate the versatility of the
microwave as well as the speed.

There's a reason I happen to have spent time with the
Perdue experts. Once when Frank was microwaving nuggets for
himself at HIGH, he found that by the time all of them were
heated, one of them was badly overcooked and therefore,
dried out and$what a dirty word this is in the Perdue
household!$tough.  Frank didn't know that the microwave was
the problem and instead assumed it was his product that was
at fault.

How can I even tell you about the crisis that one
tough "tender" caused! Frank didn't seem as upset when a
whole processing plant burned down the year before. Because
of that one tough tender, he called the plant manager, the
quality control people, the packaging people, the man who
wrote the cooking directions, the food technologists, the
woman who runs the tasting lab, and probably half a dozen
other people as well.  It didn't matter that it was the
weekend$the situation had to be addressed immediately!  He
kept repeating disconsolately, "I have no right to sell a
product like this."

Eventually, one of the Perdue food technicians came
out to our house and checked the microwave and suggested
that we'd get more even cooking if we used MEDIUM HIGH. She
said that at this setting, the microwaves  reach an
equilibrium so heating is much more even. And when there
are no hot spots and no cold spots, the chicken gets
uniformly warm with no dried out tough parts.

While she was there, she had a number of other tips
for me as well, and as I talked with other Perdue people, I
collected still more. By now, knowing a few little tricks
about the microwave, I know how to make much better use of
it. Because of the time it saves in cooking, and the time
it saves in clean-up (no baked on bits of food to scrub), I
use the microwave about as often as my oven.

Tips for Using Your Microwave

        _The best microwave tip I know is, learn about
the "cold spots" in your microwave so you don't end up with
unevenly cooked chicken.  To learn your microwave's "cold
spots," line the bottom of your microwave oven with wax
paper and then spread an eighth-inch layer of pancake
batter over it. Turn the oven on HIGH, and then check it at
30 second intervals.  At some point, (in my case after a
minute and a half), you'll see that in some places the
batter is dried out and hard, while in others, it's still
soupy, as if the heat hadn't touched it. Once I made this
check, I gained an immense respect for the fact that
microwaves don't necessarily cook evenly, and I've made
sure to compensate ever since by stirring or turning foods
as directed in microwave recipes.

_Do not use utensils with metal trim (including the
gold trim on fine china), handle clamps, or fastening
screws.  Metal trim can cause arcing (sparking). Aluminum
foil, in small amounts on the other hand, won't cause
arcing in most microwaves as long as it doesn't touch the
sides of the oven.

_The coverings used in microwave cooking have definite
purposes:  use plastic wrap to steam and tenderize; use wax
paper to hold in heat without steaming; use paper towels to
absorb moisture, yet hold in heat.

_To obtain a crisp, crunchy crumb-coated chicken,
first cook covered with wax paper, then switch to a paper
towel covering and, finally, complete cooking with chicken
uncovered.

_If the bony parts of your chicken are overcooking
before the meatier parts are done, shield the bony parts by
placing strips of thin aluminum foil over them.

_If you're microwaving chicken livers, prick each one
to allow steam to escape. Before I knew this tip, I've had
them explode in the oven.

_Microwave recipes usually call for smaller amounts of
seasonings than conventionally cooked dishes.  Microwaving
tends to intensify flavors, so you won't need as much
seasoning.

_Don't ignore the standing time called for in some of
these recipes. In microwave cookery, standing time allows
further cooking to occur after you have removed the food
from the microwave oven.  Covering the food holds heat in
and speeds this final, important step. When I've cheated on
this step, I've found the chicken hard to carve and
undercooked.

_When possible, arrange food in a circular or donut
shape; without corners, food cooks more evenly from all
sides.  For example, if you're cooking drumsticks, arrange
them like a wagon wheel with the meatier portions at the
outer edge, and the drum stick end in the center.

_Thin foods cook faster than thick foods because
microwaves lose power after they penetrate food.

_Ingredients also affect cooking time.  Foods higher
in sugar or fat heat faster and to higher temperatures than
do those with lower sugar or fat content.

_When the recipe says "70% power," or MEDIUM HIGH,
don't be tempted to get things done faster by going for
100% power.  At 70% power, the microwaves cook the product
more slowly but also more evenly, so there's less worry
about cold spots.

ROASTED CHICKEN WITH ALMOND SAUCEServes 4
Of course you can serve the pre-cooked chicken just as it
comes from the store, without doing anything else to it at
all. I've done this many times with our Perdue Done It!
roasted chicken when I've been in a hurry.  But this recipe
only takes a few extra minutes and you'll have a show piece
at the end. As you're making it, be glad for a moment that
you're not making this recipe in the year 1911.  A typical
recipe in a the December issue of The Wisconsin Farmer
assumes that you've already plucked the bird and removed
its head and feet. It directs you "to singe the bird over a
burning newspaper on a hot stove."  The stove would
probably have been a wood-burning one, and in all
probability, it would have been up to you to get the wood
for the stove. When I think of then and I think of now, I'm
glad that "We've come a long way, baby".
1 roasted chicken
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons Amaretto or other almond liqueur
1-1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup sliced toasted almonds
Heat pre-cooked roasted chicken in its own microwave tray
following package directions.
In 2-cup glass container, combine cornstarch, broth,
liqueur and lemon juice.  Cover with plastic wrap and
microwave at HIGH (100% power) 3 or 4 minutes until bubbly
and thick; stir twice during cooking.  Add almonds. Slice
chicken onto a platter and top with sauce.

FIVE-MINUTE ROASTED DRUMSTICKS
1 package roasted chicken drumsticks (4-6 per package).
Following package directions, warm roasted drumsticks in a
conventional oven or, using package tray, heat in a
microwave oven.  Brush with your favorite bottled barbecue
sauce.

CHICKEN POCKET SANDWICHESServes 4
You could use regular chicken breasts for this, but the
roaster breast has a richer, more chickeny flavor.
("Chickeny" is a word, by the way.  Frank uses it all the
time, and he ought to know.)
1 roaster boneless breast
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons finely chopped onion
1  clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
4 pita breads
Lettuce leaves
1 container (8-ounces) plain yogurt
3 tablespoons finely chopped green onion
Cut chicken into 1-inch chunks.  In 3-quart microwave-safe
utensil, combine olive oil, lemon juice, onion, garlic,
salt, oregano, and Cayenne pepper; add chicken chunks and
stir.  Cover with wax paper; microwave at HIGH (100% power)
10 minutes or until chicken has turned white.  Stir mixture
3 or 4 times during cooking.  Let stand, covered, 5
minutes.  Cut each pita bread into 2 pockets, line with
lettuce and spoon in chicken.  In small bowl, combine
yogurt and green onion; serve over chicken.

CHICKEN A LA MONTMORENCYServes 6
Any recipe with the word "Montmorency" is apt to have
cherries in it.  The sauce for this one is particularly
good and Frank liked it enough to spread the leftovers on
toast the next day at breakfast. If you don't want to
microwave the roaster breast, just cook it in your oven,
following the package directions. When I'm in a hurry, I
use this microwave recipe, but breasts are the hardest part
of the chicken to keep tender in a microwave because
they're fairly dry to begin with, and if you overcook them,
they'll get tough.
1 roaster breast
1 can (16-ounces) pitted dark sweet cherries
1/4 cup dry red wine
Water
5 teaspoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons red currant jelly (optional)
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
Salt and ground pepper to taste
Place breast, skin side down, on microwave-safe roasting
utensil.  Cover with wax paper; microwave at HIGH (100%
power) 5 minutes.  Reduce power to MEDIUM HIGH (70% power)
and cook 12 minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking
time, turn breast, skin side up; brush with drippings in
utensil.  Re-cover with wax paper; complete cooking.  Let
stand, covered, 15 minutes.  Test for doneness after
standing;  juices should run clear with no hint of pink
when breast is cut near bone.
Drain cherries, reserving syrup in a 4-cup glass container.
Place cherries and red wine in small bowl.  Add enough
water to cherry syrup to measure 1 cup.  Stir in
cornstarch, mixing until well blended.  Microwave at HIGH 3
minutes, stirring twice.  Stir cherries with wine into
thickened syrup.  Continue cooking at HIGH 1 to 2 minutes
or until mixture thickens and boils for 1 minute.  Add
jelly, if desir
ed, and butter; stir until smooth.
To serve, slice chicken and place on warm platter.  Spoon
some of cherry sauce over chicken slices; pass remaining
sauce.

CHICKEN A LA NANCYServes 4
Unlike me, Frank does not enjoy puttering around in the
kitchen.  He loves the results, but cooking is not his
favorite way to spend his free time.  (He'd be more apt to
watch a game on TV or visit with friends.)  When he does
cook, I can almost guarantee that it will be something
quick and carefree.  But there is one exception, and it's
this recipe.  I've never dared ask just who Nancy is, but
Frank once won a cooking contest using her recipe, so he's
been fond of it ever since.
He says to point out that the cooked lemon with rind does
remain as a part of the food.  It adds an unusual taste and
texture. If you don't like a strong lemony flavor, you
might start by using half the lemon that the recipe calls
for. That's what I do when I make this recipe.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster                breast
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 lemon with peel, very thinly sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon flour
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1 can (14-ounces) water-packed whole artichoke hearts,
drained and quartered
Place chicken breasts between sheets of plastic wrap.
Pound to 1/4 inch thickness and cut into 2 inch squares. If
using thin sliced boneless Roaster breast, skip the
pounding and simply cut into 2 inch squares.
Frying Pan Method:
 In a large skillet over medium heat, hat oil.  Add garlic
and saute until soft.  Add lemon and mushrooms and saute 1
to 2 minutes. Add all other ingredients except artichokes.
Fry, stirring frequently, approximately 15 minutes or until
chicken is cooked through.  Add artichokes and heat.
aMicrowave Method:
In 3-quart microwave-safe round dish, combine oil,
mushrooms, lemon slices and garlic; cover with plastic
wrap.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 3 minutes, stirring
once.  In a 1-cup glass measuring cup, combine wine and
flour; stir into mushroom mixture.
Arrange chicken pieces on top of mushroom mixture and cover
with wax paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 6
minutes per pound, stirring mixture 3 times.  Sprinkle with
salt, pepper and oregano.  Stir in artichoke quarters; re-
cover and microwave at HIGH 2 minutes.  Let stand, covered,
5 minutes.

CHICKEN THIGHS PARMESANServes 3-4
The Dijon mustard called for in this recipe is quite sharp
before it's cooked. After heating in the microwave, you'll
find that it loses much of its sharpness and leaves behind
a subtle spicy flavor. Yellow mustard won't produce the
same effect.
6 chicken thighs
1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup melted butter or margarine
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
Remove skin from thighs.  On wax paper, combine bread
crumbs and Parmesan cheese.  In shallow dish, combine
butter, mustard and Worcestershire sauce.  Brush thighs
with butter mixture and then roll in crumbs to lightly coat
both sides.  Reserve remaining butter mixture and crumbs.
Arrange thighs in circular pattern on microwave-safe
roasting utensil; cover with wax paper.  Microwave at
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per pound.  Halfway
through cooking time, turn thighs over; spoon on remaining
butter mixture and sprinkle with remaining crumb mixture.
Cover with a double thickness of paper towels.  Complete
cooking; remove paper towels during last 2 minutes cooking
time.  Let stand, uncovered, 2 minutes before serving.

CHICKEN WITH MANGO SAUCEServes 6
Mangos, which are rich in vitamins A and C, make a
delicious, colorful and unusual sauce for a roaster breast.
When mangos aren't available, try fresh or canned peaches.
1 roaster breast
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
2 ripe mangos, peeled and cut into chunks
2 tablespoons cherry- or orange-flavored liqueur
Salt and pepper to taste
Place skin side down on microwave-safe roasting utensil.
Cover with wax paper; microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5
minutes.  Reduce power to MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) and cook
12 minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn
breast skin side up; brush with drippings in utensil.  Re-
cover with wax paper and complete cooking.  Let stand,
covered, 15 minutes. Test for doneness after standing;
juices should run clear with no hint of pink when breast is
cut near the bone.
In a 4-cup glass container, place butter.  Microwave at
HIGH 30 seconds or until melted.  Stir in cornstarch until
blended; stir in brown sugar and orange juice.  In blender
or food processor fitted with steel blade, puree mango
chunks.  Stir pureed mangos into orange juice mixture.
Microwave at HIGH 4 minutes, stirring twice.  Add liqueur;
microwave 1 minute longer.
To serve, slice chicken and place on warm platter.  Spoon
some of mango sauce over slices, then pass remaining sauce.

CURRY-GLAZED BREASTServes 4
Curry powder is a blend of many spices, so you don't need
to combine spices yourself. Indian Curry Powder is mild and
Madras Curry Powder is quite hot.
1 whole roaster breast
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/4 cup honey
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons curry powder
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
Place breast bone side down on a microwave-safe roasting
utensil.
Place butter in a 2-cup glass container; microwave at HIGH
(100% power) 45 seconds.  Stir in honey, mustard, curry
powder and salt; brush mixture all over breast.  Cover with
wax paper; microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 12 minutes
per pound.  Baste breast and rotate utensil 3 or 4 times
during cooking.  Let stand, covered with wax paper, 15
minutes.  Test for doneness after standing; juices should
run clear with no hint of pink when breast is cut near
bone.

HAM AND CHICKEN ROLL-UPSServes 4
If you can't easily find the prosciutto called for in this
recipe, substitute any thinly sliced ham, such as the pre-
sliced ham you find in the deli section of your
supermarket.  Or try thin slices of smoked turkey ham.
If you slice the cooked Roll-Ups crosswise, they make
wonderful hors d'oeuvres or appetizers.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster                        breast
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crumbled
Salt and ground pepper to taste
4 thin slices prosciutto
Place chicken breast halves between 2 sheets of plastic
wrap and pound to 1/2-inch thickness.  Skip the previous
step if you are using thin sliced boneless roaster breasts.
Brush breasts with olive oil to help seal in moisture;
sprinkle with rosemary, salt and pepper.  Roll up each
breast half, starting from narrow end.  Wrap a slice of
prosciutto around each roll.
In 8-inch square microwave-safe baking dish, place chicken
rolls seam side down.  Cover with wax paper.  Microwave at
HIGH (100% power) 8 minutes, rotating dish 2 or 3 times
during cooking.  Let stand 5 minutes.  Check for doneness
after standing; juices should be clear with no hint of pink
when chicken is cut near center.

HEAVENLY CHICKENServes 4
If you're using fresh asparagus spears for this, here's how
to tell the tender part from the part that's too tough and
fibrous to be good eating. Take the bud end of an asparagus
spear in one hand and the butt end in the other and then
bend the spear until it breaks.  The part on the bud side
is tender enough to use. The spears will always break at
just that point. But don't throw away the tough end. If you
peel the tough end with a potato peeler, you'll get down to
the tender, edible part underneath and can use that portion
also. Cook the leftover parts until tender and use them in
soups or omelettes.
4 chicken breast halves
12 fresh or frozen asparagus spears
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup butter or margarine
4 tablespoons flour
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
1 1/2 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup chopped pecans
1/4 cup crushed crackers
On microwave-safe roasting pan, arrange breasts, bone side
up, in a circular pattern.  Cover loosely with plastic
wrap; microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 8 minutes per
pound.  Halfway through cooking time turn breasts over; re-
cover with plastic wrap and complete cooking.  Let stand,
covered, 10 minutes.
Rinse asparagus and remove tough end.  On microwave-safe
rack, arrange asparagus with stem ends toward outside.
Place rack in microwave-safe utensil.  Add water; cover
with plastic wrap.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5 to 7
minutes or until tender-crisp.  Let stand, covered, 3 to 5
minutes.
In 4-cup glass container, place butter; microwave at HIGH 1
minute.  Blend flour and ginger into melted butter.
Gradually add chicken broth, wine, salt and pepper,
stirring constantly.  Microwave at HIGH 5 minutes or until
thick and smooth, stirring 3 times.
In 12 x 8-inch microwave-safe dish, arrange cooked
asparagus, with stem ends toward outside; pour half of wine
sauce over asparagus.  Arrange chicken breasts on top with
meatier portions toward outside; spoon remaining sauce over
breasts.  Sprinkle pecans and cracker crumbs on top; cover
with a double thickness of paper towels.  Microwave at
MEDIUM-HIGH 5 minutes or until heated through.

MICROWAVE MARMALADE DRUMSTICKSServes 4
This recipe calls for a microwave-safe utensil.  Do you
know how to tell for sure if your utensil is suitable?

1. Place the utensil and a cup of water side by side
in the microwave        oven.

2. Turn the oven to the HIGH setting for 1 minute.  If
the dish is warm, then it is absorbing microwave energy.
Do not use it in the microwave oven.
5 roaster drumsticks
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
3/4 cup finely chopped onion
1/2 cup orange marmalade (You can also use current jelly)
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
In 9-inch microwave-safe utensil, combine butter and onion.
Cover; microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5 minutes.  Blend in
marmalade and curry powder; turn drumsticks in mixture.
Place drumsticks with meatier portions toward outer edge of
utensil; cover with wax paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH
(70% power) 12 minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking
time, turn chicken over, re-cover with wax paper and
microwave remaining time.
Let stand, covered, 15 minutes.

SAUCY MICROWAVE CHICKEN WINGSServes 4
To make an attractive presentation, try tucking the tip of
each wing under to form a triangle.
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 small clove garlic, minced
16 chicken wings
In 12 x 8-inch microwave-safe utensil, combine all
ingredients except wings; turn wings in mixture.  Cover
with wax paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 8
minutes per pound, turning wings over 3 to 4 times during
cooking.
Let stand, covered, 10 minutes.

TEX-MEX DRUMSTICKSServes 4
Removing skin from chicken is an easy way to reduce
calories, and because moisture doesn't evaporate readily in
microwave cooking, the chicken will remain juicy and
flavorful.
6 chicken drumsticks
1/4 cup finely chopped pecans
1/4 cup fine, dry bread crumbs
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 cup taco-flavored or other pourable salad dressing
Remove skin from drumsticks.  On wax paper, combine pecans,
bread crumbs, parsley and chili powder.  Brush drumsticks
with taco dressing, then roll in crumb mixture to coat all
sides.  Reserve crumbs and dressing.
On microwave-safe roasting pan, arrange drumsticks in
circular pattern, with meatier portions toward outside.
Cover with wax paper; microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power)
10 minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn
drumsticks over, spoon on remaining dressing and sprinkle
with reserved crumb mixture.  Cover with a double thickness
of paper towels.  Complete cooking, removing paper towels
during last 2 minutes.  Let stand, uncovered, 5 minutes
before serving.

MICROWAVE CHICKEN BREASTS PAPRIKASHServes 4
One way of avoiding having your eyes tear when the slicing
the onion in this recipe is to do the cutting under running
tap water. The vapors that hurt
your eyes won't have a chance to get into the air, but
instead will just wash down the drain.
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 green peppers, thinly sliced
1 large onion, thinly sliced
1 can (8-ounces) tomato sauce
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
Ground pepper to taste
4 chicken breast halves
1 container (8-ounces) commercial sour cream
1 tablespoon flour
In a 12 x 8-inch microwave-safe utensil, combine oil,
peppers and onion.  Cover with plastic wrap; microwave at
HIGH (100% power) 5 minutes.  Stir in tomato sauce,
paprika, marjoram, salt, and pepper.  On top of tomato
mixture, place breasts bone side up with meatier portions
toward outside.  Cover with wax paper; microwave at HIGH 5
minutes; reduce power to MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) and cook
10 minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn
breasts over and stir mixture.  Re-cover with wax paper and
microwave remaining time.  Let stand 5 minutes.
Stir sour cream and flour into tomato mixture.  Cover;
microwave at HIGH 1 minute.  Stir and let stand 2 minutes.
Pour over chicken breasts.

CORNISH HENS WITH LEMON TARRAGON SAUCEServes 4
You can get more juice from a lemon if you roll it around
on a flat surface first while pressing your palm against it
fairly hard.  This ruptures the little juice sacks. You'll
also get more juice if the lemon is at room temperature
rather than just out of the refrigerator.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1/4 cup flour
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh tarragon, divided, or 1/2 teaspoon
dried
1 cup chicken broth
Juice of one lemon (about 1/4 cup)
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 pound fresh asparagus, or substitute green beans
2 teaspoons water
With sharp knife or poultry shears, cut hens in half,
lengthwise.  Remove and discard backbone and skin.  Coat
hen pieces lightly with flour and sprinkle with half of
tarragon.  Place hens bone side up, with legs to inside, on
a microwave-safe roasting utensil.
In a 4-cup glass container, combine chicken broth, lemon
juice, remaining tarragon and pepper.  Microwave at HIGH
(100% power) 3 to 4 minutes, or until boiling.  Baste hens
with half of hot broth.  Cover with wax paper; microwave at
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per pound combined
weight of hens.  Halfway through cooking time, turn hens
bone side down and baste with remaining broth mixture.  Re-
cover and complete cooking.  Let stand, covered, 10
minutes.
Slice asparagus diagonally into 1-inch pieces and place in
a 2-quart microwave-safe utensil with water.  Cover;
microwave at HIGH 3 TO 4 minutes.  Let stand 2 minutes;
drain and set aside.  When ready to serve, add asparagus to
lemon sauce and pour over hens.

MICROWAVE HENS JUBILEEServes 2
This is a close cousin of CHICKEN A LA MONTMORENCY, but
it's spicier and less sweet.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1 can (16-ounces) dark sweet cherries in syrup
1/4 cup dry sherry
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 cup chili sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
With poultry shears or sharp knife, split hens lengthwise,
removing backbone, if desired.  In 12 x 8 microwave-safe
utensil, arrange hens, bone side up with meatier portions
to outside.
In 2-quart microwave-safe utensil, drain liquid from
cherries; blend in sherry and cornstarch.  Add cherries,
chili sauce, garlic, salt and pepper.  Microwave at HIGH
(100% power) 3 to 4 minutes, stirring once, until mixture
begins to boil and thicken.  Pour sauce over hens.  Cover
loosely with wax paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70%
power) 8 minutes per pound, turning the hens over halfway
through cooking time.  Re-cover with wax paper and
microwave remaining time.  Let stand, covered, 10 minutes.

PINEAPPLE BAKED CORNISH HENSServes 4
Green peppers and most other fresh vegetables are ideal for
microwaving.  They retain their clear color and stay
crunchy and fresh tasting.  For extra color, substitute 1/2
sweet red pepper and 1/2 green pepper for the single whole
green pepper.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1 green pepper, cored, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 can (8-ounces) crushed pineapple in natural juices
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
With poultry shears or sharp knife, split hens lengthwise
and remove and discard skin.  Place hens bone side up on a
microwave-safe 12 x 8-inch utensil, arranging with legs to
inside.
In a 2-quart microwave-safe utensil, place green pepper,
onion and oil.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 2 to 3
minutes or until pepper is tender.  Add pineapple, soy
sauce, mustard and ginger; microwave at HIGH 1 to 2
minutes.
Baste hen halves with half of pineapple mixture.  Cover
with wax paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10
minutes per pound combined weight of hens.  Halfway through
cooking time, turn hens bone side down and baste with
remaining pineapple mixture.  Re-cover and complete
cooking.  Let stand, covered, 10 minutes.  Serve with
pineapple sauce.

ROSEMARY HENS WITH LIGHT WINE GRAVYServes 4
Game hens are sold both fresh and frozen.  If you've
selected a frozen one, follow your microwave manufacturer's
directions for defrosting and turn and rearrange the birds
frequently for even defrosting. I've tried game hens both
fresh and frozen, and I found that there's enough of a
difference in flavor and tenderness to make me strongly
prefer fresh.
2 Cornish game hens
6 sprigs fresh parsley
1 small onion, halved
1 clove garlic, halved
3 small carrots, peeled, cut in 1/2-inch slices (1 cup)
2 medium tomatoes, peeled and cut in wedges, or 6 cherry
tomatoes, halved
1 medium zucchini, cut in 3/4-inch slices (1 cup)
1/4 pound mushrooms, quartered (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 and 1/2 teaspoon minced, fresh rosemary or 1/2 teaspoon
dried
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
2 tablespoons cold water
2 teaspoons cornstarch
Into each hen cavity, place 3 sprigs parsley, 1/2 onion and
1/2 garlic clove.
Place carrots, tomatoes, zucchini and mushrooms in a
microwave-safe baking dish.  Combine chicken broth, wine
and 1/4 teaspoon rosemary; pour over vegetables.  Cover
with plastic wrap and microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5
minutes.  Arrange hens, breast side down, on top.  Sprinkle
with remaining rosemary and pepper.  Cover with wax paper.
Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 11 minutes per pound
combined weight of hens.  Halfway through cooking time,
stir vegetables; turn hens breast side up and rotate dish.
Re-cover with wax paper.
Remove hens to serving platter, reserving juices for gravy.
Using slotted spoon, arrange vegetables around hens and
cover with foil; allow to stand 10 minutes.  Cut hens in
half to serve.
To prepare gravy, in a 4 cup glass container,  combine
water and cornstarch.  Slowly add reserved cooking juices
(about 3/4 cup) from hens; stir to blend.  Microwave at
HIGH 2 minutes or until thickened, stirring twice.  Serve
with Cornish hens.

HONEY MUSTARD ROASTERServes 8
Covering is a key technique in successful microwave
cooking. In a conventional oven a sweet honey-mustard
basting sauce could overbrown.  Instead, in the microwave
it dries as the roaster skin cooks and it forms an
attractive golden glaze on the bird.
1 whole roaster (about 6 pounds)
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
Remove giblets from roaster.  With rounded wooden picks,
fasten skin across cavity and neck openings.  Place
roaster, breast side down, on microwave-safe roasting pan.
Melt butter in a 1-cup glass measuring cup by microwaving
at HIGH (100% power) 1 minute.  Stir in honey and remaining
ingredients; brush roaster with mixture and cover with wax
paper.  Microwave at HIGH 5 minutes.  Reduce power to
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) and cook 12 minutes per pound,
brushing frequently with honey mixture.  Halfway through
cooking time, turn roaster breast side up; complete
cooking.  Let stand, covered, 20 minutes. Test for doneness
after standing;  juices should run clear with no hint of
pink when thigh is pierced.  Pour drippings from utensil
into remaining sauce mixture in measuring cup; microwave at
HIGH 2 minutes or until heated through.  Serve sauce with
roaster.

MEXICAN MICROWAVE CHICKEN CASSEROLE
Leftover Mexican Chicken Casserole makes a fast and
delicious taco filling.  Shred chicken, reheat in sauce and
serve with shredded lettuce and cheese and a dollop of sour
cream.
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 large onion, chopped (1 cup)
1 large green pepper, chopped (1 cup)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 can (14.5 ounces) tomato sauce
2 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 chicken cut in serving pieces
1 can (17-ounces) corn, drained
In 3 to 5-quart microwave-safe utensil, combine butter,
onion, pepper and garlic.  Cover with plastic wrap;
microwave at HIGH (100% power) 3 to 5 minutes or until
onion and pepper are tender.  Stir in tomato sauce, flour,
salt, cumin, oregano and pepper.
Place chicken pieces, bone side up with meatier portions
toward outside of utensil, on top of mixture.  Cover with
wax paper; microwave at HIGH 5 minutes.  Reduce power to
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) and cook 10 minutes per pound.
Halfway through cooking time, turn chicken pieces over; re-
cover with wax paper and microwave remaining time.  Let
stand, covered, 10 minutes.  Remove chicken pieces to
serving dish; cover.  Add corn to sauce in utensil; cover
with plastic wrap.  Microwave at HIGH 2 minutes.  To serve,
pour sauce over chicken.

PLUM-SPICED CHICKENServes 4
The plum sauce is a low-fat way to make the chicken develop
an attractive color as it cooks in the microwave.
1 chicken, cut in half lengthwise
1 cup plum jelly or preserves
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup chopped onion
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder (optional)
Place chicken halves, skin side down, on microwave-safe
roasting utensil, set aside.
In a 4-cup glass container, combine jelly and remaining
ingredients.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 4 minutes,
stirring 3 times.  Brush chicken halves with sauce; cover
with wax paper.
Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 to 12 minutes per
pound, brushing chicken frequently with sauce.  Halfway
through cooking time, turn chicken halves over; brush with
sauce.  Re-cover with wax paper; complete cooking.  Let
stand, covered 15 minutes.

STUFFED CHICKEN CHARLESTON STYLEServes 4
The microwave oven makes it possible to make this succulent
roast chicken and all the trimmings in less than an hour.
To complete the meal with "baked" potatoes, you can
microwave them during the chicken's standing time.
1 whole chicken
4 strips uncooked bacon, diced
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped celery
1 1/2 cups packaged cornbread stuffing
1/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans
5 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted, divided
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons dry sherry, divided
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
Ground pepper to taste
Remove giblets.  In 1 1/2-quart microwave-safe utensil
place diced bacon; cover with paper towel.  Microwave at
HIGH (100% power) 3 minutes or until crisp, stirring twice.
With slotted spoon, remove bacon to paper towel to drain;
set aside.  Reserve drippings.  In same 1 1/2-quart
microwave-safe utensil, combine onion and celery; cover
with plastic wrap.  Microwave at HIGH 2 minutes.
In a mixing bowl, combine onions and celery with stuffing,
pecans, and cooked bacon.  In cup, blend 2 tablespoons
butter, 3 tablespoons sherry and water; toss with stuffing.
Spoon stuffing loosely into cavity and neck openings of
chicken.  With rounded wooden picks, fasten skin across
cavity and neck openings.
Combine 1 tablespoon butter with 1 teaspoon sherry; brush
on chicken.  Place chicken, breast side down, on microwave-
safe roasting utensil; cover with wax paper.  Microwave at
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per pound, brushing
chicken frequently with butter-sherry mixture and
drippings.  Halfway through cooking time, turn chicken
breast side up; re-cover with wax paper.  Complete cooking.
Let stand, covered, 15 minutes.  Test for doneness after
standing;  juices should run clear with no hint of pink
when thigh is pierced
Pour pan drippings into a 2-cup glass container.  Add 1/2
cup sherry to roasting utensil to loosen pan juices; pour
into container with drippings.  Microwave at HIGH 3
minutes; stir in remaining 2 tablespoons butter and
parsley.  Serve chicken, sliced, with stuffing and gravy.

CHEESY MICROWAVE THIGHSServes 4
Chicken thighs and drumsticks are fairly uniform in size,
making them an ideal choice for quick cooking in the
microwave.
6 chicken thighs
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
1 cup finely chopped onion
2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 cup milk
1/2 cup grated Swiss cheese
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons white wine
Pinch freshly grated or ground nutmeg
Minced, fresh parsley (optional)
Remove and discard skin from thighs.  In a 12 x 8-inch
microwave-safe utensil, combine 2 tablespoons butter and
onion.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5 minutes.  Arrange
thighs in a circular pattern on top of onions.  Cover with
wax paper; microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes
per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn thighs over;
re-cover with wax paper and microwave remaining time.  Let
stand, covered, 10 minutes.
Place remaining butter in 4-cup glass container; microwave
at HIGH 30 to 50 seconds.  Blend in flour and salt;
gradually stir in milk, mixing well.  Microwave at HIGH 3
to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until mixture boils and
thickens.  Add cheeses, wine and nutmeg; stir until cheese
is melted. Pour sauce over chicken thighs; cover with wax
paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH 2 to 3 minutes or until
heated through.  Garnish with parsley if desired.

CHICKEN MARENGOServes 3-4
Frank admires Napoleon because he was such an effective
leader and motivator of men. But Frank has another reason
to like the famous French general. Napoleon liked chicken
so much that during his campaigns, he ate it almost every
night.  In 1800 when Napoleon was fighting in Italy, the
supply wagons were late and his chef had to scour the
countryside for whatever food he could find.  The result
was a chicken dish made with olive oil, mushrooms, tomato,
garlic and other ingredients available from the nearby
farms.  Napoleon liked the dish so much that he named it
"Chicken Marengo," in honor of the battlefield where he had
just been fighting, and from then on ordered it served to
him after every battle.
6 chicken thighs
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 cups coarsely chopped fresh plum tomatoes
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
Remove and discard skin from thighs.  In 3-quart microwave-
safe utensil, combine remaining ingredients; cover with
plastic wrap.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5 minutes,
stirring twice.  Arrange thighs in circular pattern on top
of tomato mixture; spoon mixture over thighs.  Cover with
wax paper; microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes
per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn thighs over;
re-cover and complete cooking.  Let stand, covered, 10
minutes before serving.

CHINESE CHICKENServes 4
The shape of foods affects cooking results.  Thin areas
cook faster than thicker ones, so meatier portions should
always be placed toward the outer edge of the utensil where
microwave energy is greater.
4 chicken drumsticks
4 chicken thighs
1/4 cup melted butter
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/8 teaspoon minced, fresh ginger
1 can (3-ounces) chow mein noodles
1/4 cup sliced almonds
Salt to taste
Remove and discard skin from drumsticks and thighs.  In
small bowl, mix butter, soy sauce, pepper and ginger.  In
blender or food processor fitted with steel blade, finely
chop chow mein noodles, almonds and salt; transfer to wax
paper.  Brush chicken with soy mixture, then roll in noodle
mixture to coat all sides.  Arrange on microwave-safe
roasting pan, with meatier portions toward outside; cover
with wax paper.  Reserve remaining soy and noodle mixture.
Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per pound.
Halfway through cooking time turn legs and thighs over;
spoon on remaining soy mixture and sprinkle with remaining
noodle mixture.  Cover with a double thickness of paper
towels.  Complete cooking, remove paper towels during last
2 minutes.  Let stand, uncovered, 5 minutes before serving.

DRUMSTICKS LITTLE ITALY STYLEServes 4
Do you know how to tell when rice is done?  The aim of
cooking rice is to have all the little starch granules
inside each grain swell with water but not burst.  You can
tell that rice is undercooked if you pinch a grain and feel
a hard or gritty core.  You can tell that it's overcooked
if you look at a grain closely and find that the edges are
split and ragged. It's perfectly cooked if the grain is the
same smooth shape as the uncooked grain, only puffed,
swollen and soft.
1 cup chopped, canned tomatoes
3/4 cup long grain rice
1 cup chicken broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 medium onion, chopped
1 large clove garlic, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
5 roaster drumsticks
Salt and ground pepper to taste
2 tablespoons or more minced, fresh parsley
In a 3 quart microwave-safe utensil combine tomatoes and
rice.  Stir in broth and wine;  add onion, garlic, thyme,
and mix well.  Cover with plastic wrap; microwave at high
(100% power) 5 minutes.  Arrange drumsticks over top of
mixture, with meatiest portions to the outer edge of
utensil.  Re-cover with plastic wrap; microwave at HIGH
(100% power) 5 minutes then at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 12
minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking time stir and
turn drumsticks over.  Re-cover and complete the cooking.
Let stand, covered 10 minutes before serving. Test for
doneness after standing;  juices should run clear with no
hint of pink when drumstick is pierced.  Season with salt
and pepper.  Add parsley to rice mixture for garnish.

OLIVE MICROWAVED CHICKENMakes 6 Drumsticks
When you saw the title of this recipe, did you hesitate
because you were concerned that the calories in olives
could wreck your diet? Not to worry! Olives are actually a
fairly low calorie food, with the average one having only
4-5 calories.  The largest jumbo olive has only 12
calories.
6 chicken drumsticks
1 cup slivered onion strips
1/2 cup slivered green pepper strips
1/2 cup thawed lemonade concentrate
1/2 cup ketchup
1/4 cup sliced pimento-stuffed olives
1/4 cup sliced pitted ripe olives
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
Remove and discard skin from drumsticks.  In a 12 x 8-inch
microwave-safe utensil, combine remaining ingredients;
cover with plastic wrap.  Microwave HIGH (100% power) 5
minutes, stirring once.
Turn drumsticks in sauce to coat.  Arrange drumsticks in
circular pattern in sauce with meatier portions toward
outside of utensil.  Cover with wax paper; microwave at
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per pound.  Halfway
through cooking time, turn drumsticks and spoon sauce on
top.  Re-cover with wax paper; complete cooking.  Let
stand, covered, 10 minutes before serving.

PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH-COUNTRY DRUMSTICKSServes 2
When you're buying the apples for this recipe, you can tell
which ones are Red Delicious by looking at the base of the
apples.  A Red Delicious always has five knobs or points at
the base.
5 roaster drumsticks
Salt and ground pepper to taste
6 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
1/2 cup apple juice (1/4 cup for microwave)
1 tablespoon soy sauce (1-1/2 teaspoons for microwave)
1/4 cup brown sugar, firmly-packed (1/8 cup for microwave)
2 Red Delicious apples, peeled, cored and cut into 8 wedges
each
2 tablespoons sugar
Conventional Method:
Season drumsticks with salt and pepper. In a large skillet
over medium heat, melt 3 tablespoons butter. Add drumsticks
and brown for 4 to 5 minutes per side.  In a measuring cup
combine apple juice, soy sauce and brown sugar and pour
over drumsticks.  Cover and simmer 20 minutes.  Turn and
simmer 25 minutes longer.
Ten minutes before end of cooking time, in another skillet,
over medium-high heat, melt remaining butter. Add apple
wedges and brown on one side.  Sprinkle with sugar and
turn.  Brown other side.  Transfer chicken to serving dish
and top with apple wedges.  Spoon sauce over top.
aMicrowave Oven:
Place 2 tablespoons of butter in a 9-inch microwave-safe
utensil.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 40 seconds.
Combine 1/4 cup apple juice, 1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce and
1/8 cup firmly packed brown sugar with melted butter.
Place drumsticks in apple juice mixture and turn to coat
well.  Arrange drumsticks with meatiest portions toward
outer edge of utensil.  Cover with wax paper.  Microwave at
MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 12 minutes per pound.  Half way
through cooking time turn drumsticks and spoon sauce over
each.  Re-cover and complete cooking.   Let stand, covered,
5 to 10 minutes.
Place 2 tablespoons butter in a 2-quart microwave-safe
utensil.  Microwave at HIGH 40 seconds.  Sprinkle butter
with 2 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar; stir.  Place
apple wedges in brown sugar mixture; toss gently to coat.
Microwave at HIGH 3 minutes, stir.  Microwave an additional
3 minutes or until apples are tender.  Transfer chicken to
serving dish and top with apple wedges.  Spoon sauce over
top.

ROASTER THIGHS IN WINEServes 4
For the longest shelf life and the best flavor, don't wash
the mushrooms called for in this recipe until just before
using them.  And don't soak them, just lightly mist them or
wipe them with a damp paper towel.  With soaking, they
easily become waterlogged and lose some of their flavor.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
4 strips uncooked bacon, diced
1 cup Burgundy or other dry, red wine
2 tablespoons cognac or brandy
16 small whole onions, peeled
8 ounces sliced, fresh mushrooms, 2 cups
3 tablespoons flour
2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
Cut thigh cutlets in half.  In 3-quart microwave-safe
utensil, place bacon; microwave at HIGH (100% power) until
crisp, 3 to 4 minutes.  Combine wine and Cognac and add to
utensil with remaining ingredients; stir well.  Arrange
thighs, with thicker portions toward outer edge, on top of
vegetables.  Cover with wax paper; microwave at HIGH 5
minutes.
Reduce power to MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) and cook 12 minutes
per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, stir vegetable
mixture and turn cutlets over.  Let stand, covered, 15
minutes before serving.

SPICY AFRICAN DRUMSTICKSServes 4
If you eliminate the crushed pepper in this recipe, it
could be a dish children would love.
Be sure the peanuts you use in the recipe are fresh.  Once
a package has been opened, keep it in the refrigerator
since peanuts rapidly go rancid. As an emergency first aid
measure for peanuts that aren't as fresh as you wish they
were, try this tip I got from a peanut farmer in Georgia.
Put the peanuts in a sieve and pour boiling water over
them.  The hot water will wash away some of the oils that
are responsible for the off-flavor.
6 chicken drumsticks
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 cup chopped onion
1 garlic clove, minced
1 can (16-ounces) tomato puree
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/4 cup peanut butter
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
Remove and discard skin from drumsticks.  In a 12 x 8-inch
microwave-safe utensil, combine  oil, onion and garlic.
Cover with plastic wrap; microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5
minutes or until onions are tender.  Stir in tomato puree,
salt and red pepper.
Arrange drumsticks in utensil with meatier portion toward
outside; spoon tomato sauce over top.  Cover with wax
paper; microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per
pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn drumsticks over;
re-cover with wax paper and microwave remaining time.
Remove drumsticks to serving platter; cover with foil and
let stand 10 minutes.  Stir peanut butter and peanuts into
tomato sauce.  Cover with plastic wrap; microwave at HIGH 2
minutes.  To serve, spoon sauce over drumsticks.

CORNUCOPIA STUFFED ROASTERServes 8
A roaster stuffed with vegetables and rice is a tasty meal
in one dish.  The stuffing doesn't increase the cooking
time, which is about one hour less in a microwave than
required for conventional roasting.
1 whole roaster (about 6 pounds)
1/4 cup hot water
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 cup frozen peas and carrots
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
Browning spray (optional)
Remove giblets.  In a 1-cup glass measuring cup, place
water and butter; microwave at HIGH (100% power) 1 minute.
In 1-quart microwave-safe utensil, place peas and carrots;
cover.  Microwave at HIGH 4 minutes, stirring once; drain.
In a small bowl, combine rice, melted butter mixture, peas
and carrots, parsley, thyme and salt.  Place in cavity of
roaster; with rounded wooden picks, fasten skin across
cavity opening and at neck.  Place roaster, breast side
down, on microwave-safe roasting pan.  Spray with browning
spray or brush roaster with melted butter if desired; cover
with wax paper.
Microwave at HIGH 5 minutes.  Reduce power to MEDIUM-HIGH
(70% power).  Cook 12 minutes per pound, brushing with
drippings several times during cooking.  Halfway through
cooking time, turn roaster over, using paper towels to
protect hands.  Pour off drippings and reserve, if desired.
Baste roaster with drippings or use browning spray; cover
with wax paper and complete cooking.
Let stand, covered with aluminum foil, 20 minutes.  Test
for doneness after standing; juice should run clear with no
hint of pink when thigh is pierced.  To serve, spoon
stuffing into serving bowl and slice roaster.
CHICKEN WING PAELLAServes 4-6
Paella is a Spanish dish with a mixture of rice,
vegetables, meat and sometimes shellfish. I lived in Spain
for a couple of years and came to the conclusion that there
must be almost as many versions of Paella as there are
Spanish cooks$which means that you have a lot of latitude
to vary the ingredients according to what you have handy in
your refrigerator. I like this better the next day, when
the different flavors have had a chance to "marry."
10 chicken wings
1 pound sweet Italian sausage links
1 teaspoon browning sauce
1 large onion, chopped
1 sweet red pepper, cut into thin strips
1 medium-sized zucchini, chopped
1 can (16-ounces) tomatoes, undrained
1/2 cup hot water
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/2 teaspoon Tabasco
2 cups hot cooked rice
1 cup frozen peas, thawed
Cut wing-tip section from wings.  Set tips aside to cook
later in soup or stew, if desired.  Brush sausages with
browning sauce; cut into 1-inch pieces.  In 3-quart
microwave-safe dish, place sausage pieces; cover with wax
paper.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 6 to 7 minutes, or
until sausage loses its pink color, stirring twice.  With
slotted spoon remove sausage.
To drippings in dish, add onion, red pepper and zucchini;
cover with plastic wrap.  Microwave at HIGH 5 minutes,
stirring twice.  Add tomatoes, browned sausages, water,
salt, oregano, paprika, turmeric and Tabasco; stir to
blend.
Arrange chicken wings in circular pattern on top of tomato
mixture.  Cover with plastic wrap; microwave at HIGH 5
minutes.  Reduce power to MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power); cook 10
minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking time, turn
wings over; re-cover and complete cooking.  Stir in hot
cooked rice and peas; microwave at HIGH 3 minutes.
To warm for serving, cover with plastic wrap to speed
cooking and microwave at HIGH until heated through.  Let
stand 5 minutes before serving.




CHAPTER THREE-CHICKEN FOR DIETERS

Are you concerned about the cholesterol in your diet?
Are you watching calories and trying to cut down on fat?
Has your doctor suggested that you consume less salt?

Then read on. The wonderful thing about chicken is
that the low cholesterol and the low calorie recipes are
the same.  And the flavors that add spark to a low calories
recipe are the same ones that can help you get along with
little or no salt.

Chicken is the dieter's ray of sunshine. Except for
turkey breast, no
other popular meat is as low in calories as skinless
chicken breast.  A 3-ounce portion of skinless broiled
chicken breast has only 115 calories.  An equivalent size
portion of cooked lean trimmed beef would average 189
calories, and cooked lean, trimmed pork is 198 calories.

Chicken is also lowest in saturated fat compared with
non-poultry meats.

Grams of Saturated Fat
 Cooked 3-ounce portion skinless chicken breast:        0.4
 Average cooked 3-ounce portion of chicken:             1.1
 Average cooked 3-ounce portion of lean, trimmed beef:  3.4
 Average cooked 3-ounce portion of lean, trimmed pork:  3.8

To avoid both fat and calories when cooking with chicken:

_Choose breast meat. This is the leanest part of the
bird and has less than half the fat of, for example, thigh
meat. Because of its low fat content, it's the only meat I
ever serve Frank, and it's the only meat he ever asks for
in restaurants.

_Remove the skin.  Forty percent of the fat in poultry
is attached to the skin and therefore can be easily
removed. This is in contrast with other meats, where the
fat is dispersed throughout the meat and not so easily
removed.  One point, though.  If you're broiling or baking
or grilling chicken, leave the skin on until you're
finished cooking; otherwise the meat will lose too much
moisture and become tough.  I've watched tests done at the
Perdue Tenderness Laboratory in which they measured the
tenderness of breast meat roasted with the skin and without
the skin. The meat cooked with the skin retained its
moisture and was startlingly more tender than the meat
cooked without the skin.

_Roast, broil, poach, or grill chicken instead of
frying it.

_Substitute low fat dairy products in recipes.  Use
yoghurt or light sour cream instead of sour cream, and non-
fat milk instead of regular milk. To be honest, the taste
isn't as rich, but if you're watching calories and
cholesterol, these substitutions make a substantial
difference. For example, plain low fat yoghurt is  122
calories per cup and light sour cream about 360 calories,
while the same amount of regular sour cream is 440 to 454
calories. Non-fat milk is 80 to 90 calories per 8-ounce
glass, while whole milk is 150 to 160 calories.

_Replace oil or fat in marinades with fresh lemon or
lime juice, or with wine or vinegar.

_Broil with wine instead of butter.

_Take advantage of non-caloric pan sprays.

_If you're really counting every single calorie, you
may want to choose Cornish hens rather than the older
broilers and roasters.  Cornish hens and broilers are young
birds and they bear the same relationship to the older
roasters that veal does to beef: the younger the animal,
the lower the fat content. For comparison, the white meat
of a Cornish is 35 calories per ounce of cooked meat; the
white meat of a broiler is 45 calories per cooked ounce.
For low salt diets:

_Avoid prepared sauces such as barbecue sauce or
ketchup:  usually they are high in salt.

_Season chicken with foods that are naturally high in
potassium, such as tomatoes, citrus, raisins or bananas.
When you eat foods high in potassium, you don't miss the
sodium so much. Tomato paste, by the way, is very high in
potassium, and does not have as much added salt as most
prepared or canned foods.

_Season foods with garlic, onion, wine and a variety
of herbs and spices.  Again, you'll miss the sodium less.

_Trick your palette by cooking with your own flavored
vinegars.  Use a cup of whichever fresh herb you can find,
such as tarragon or mint or dill, for two cups of plain
white vinegar and then add a garlic clove or twist of lemon
peel.  Store in a screw top jar for several days and if you
want it really strong, leave it for a week.  You might
taste it along the way to see if it's too strong.  Finally,
strain it and pour into a sterilized bottle and seal.

_Season chicken with concentrated homemade chicken
broth.  Make chicken stock (use the recipe on page ___, but
omit the salt), boil it down until it's concentrated, and
then freeze it in ice cube trays.  Use individual cubes to
intensify the flavor of casseroles or stir fry dishes.

After a couple of weeks of following a low salt diet,
you'll find that your taste changes and that you'll
actually be satisfied with far less salt.  You'll even find
that the olives and potato chips and peanuts that once
tasted just right, now seem too salty.  We've found that
with salt, the less you eat, the less you feel you need$but
be patient because this doesn't happen overnight.

For that matter, a preference for low fat cooking may
not happen overnight either. In fact, to level with you, I
think that in most cases it won't happen overnight. If
you're not used to the low fat substitutions for rich
sauces and gravies, some of the recipes in this chapter may
seem downright Spartan to you the first time you try them.
But once you're used to them, you may find as Frank and I
have, that with time it's not only possible to get used to
lighter cooking, it's actually possible to prefer it.

BARBECUE DRUMSTICKSServes 8
Microwave Recipe
To save additional fat and calories, remove the skin from
the drumsticks. I wouldn't recommend this for a
conventional oven recipe because the meat would dry out.
But microwaving retains moisture, and the sauce adds
flavor.
8 roaster drumsticks
1 cup water
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/3 cup tomato paste
1 tablespoon vinegar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1-1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
Remove skin from drumsticks and discard.  In 4-cup glass
container, combine water, onion, tomato paste, vinegar,
garlic, chili powder, mustard and pepper until well
blended.  Cover with plastic wrap; microwave at HIGH (100%
power) 5 minutes.  Stir and microwave, uncovered, 5 minutes
longer.  Pour half the mixture over bottom of a 12 x 8-inch
microwave-safe utensil.
Place drumsticks in sauce with meatier portions toward
outer edge of utensil.  Pour remaining sauce over
drumsticks; cover with wax paper.  Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH
(70% power) 12 minutes per pound.  Halfway through cooking
time, turn drumsticks over and move drumsticks to sides of
utensil.  Re-cover with wax paper; complete cooking.  Let
stand, covered, 15 minutes before serving.
Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 94. Protein 16 grams. Carbohydrate 3 grams. Fat 2
grams. Cholesterol 51 mg. Sodium 142 mg.
BURGUNDY CHICKENServes 4
Microwave Recipe
The Perdue home economists say that microwave recipes are
often more nutritious than their conventional versions
because microwaving requires much less liquid, ensuring
that vitamins and minerals are not washed away.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1/2 cup Burgundy or other dry red wine
1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 bay leaf
1/2 pound pearl onions, peeled
1/4 pound small mushrooms, sliced
8 small new potatoes, cut into quarters
2 carrots (about 1 cup), thinly sliced
2 tablespoons water
1-1/2 tablespoon cornstarch
Remove and discard skin and visible fat from the larger
chicken pieces.  In a 3-quart microwave-safe utensil,
combine wine, chicken broth, thyme, pepper, and bay leaf.
Add onions, mushrooms, potatoes, and carrots.  Cover and
microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5 minutes.  Arrange chicken
on top of vegetables, bone-side up, with meatier portions
toward outer edge of utensil.  Cover with wax paper;
microwave at HIGH 15 minutes.  Turn chicken pieces over and
rearrange, spooning vegetable mixture over each piece.  Re-
cover; microwave 5-6 minutes per pound or until chicken and
vegetables are fork tender.  Remove chicken pieces and
vegetables; cover to keep warm.
In microwave-safe cup, combine water and cornstarch.  Add
small amount of hot pan juices to cup and stir to blend;
gradually stir cornstarch mixture into remaining juices.
Microwave on HIGH 2 minutes; stir and microwave 2 minutes
longer or until boiling.  Serve sauce over chicken and
vegetables.
Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 438. Protein 42 grams. Carbohydrate 29 grams. Fat
17 grams. Cholesterol 122 mg. Sodium 137 mg.
CHICKEN AU POIVREServes 4
Pepper's piquant flavor helps disguise the lack of salt.
l roaster boneless breast or 1 package thin sliced roaster
breast
2 tablespoons flour
2 teaspoons cracked black pepper
l teaspoon dry mustard
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 cup dry red wine
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
Remove and discard visible fat from boneless breast;  slice
thin. (You can skip this step if you have the thin sliced
roaster breast.)  Place chicken slices between sheets of
plastic wrap and pound to 1/8 inch thickness.  On wax
paper, combine flour, pepper and mustard.  Lightly coat
chicken with flour mixture, pressing to make pepper adhere.
In large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add
garlic; saute 30 seconds.  Place chicken in skillet so that
pieces do not touch.  Cook about 3 minutes or until lightly
browned, turning once.  Remove to serving platter; keep
warm.  Pour off fat; stir in wine.  Cook over high heat,
stirring constantly 2 to 3 minutes or until thickened and
liquid is reduced by one-half.   Stir in parsley.  Spoon
sauce over chicken.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 255.  Protein 36 grams.  Carbohydrate 5 grams.
Fat 9 grams. Cholesterol 90 mg.  Sodium 81 mg.

CHICKEN PROVENCALServes 4
Microwave Recipe
Do you know why you brown chicken first in traditional
stews and casseroles? It's to seal in the juices.  You
don't need to in microwave cooking, so you save the fat
calories from the butter or margarine or oil you'd use for
browning, and the chicken still ends up moist and tender.
4 chicken breast halves
3 cups coarsely chopped fresh Italian plum tomatoes

or a 28-ounce can, drained
1-1/2 cups sliced mushrooms (12-ounces)
1/3 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
2 tablespoons dry white wine
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
Remove and discard skin from chicken breasts. In a 3-quart
microwave-safe utensil, combine tomatoes, mushrooms, onion,
garlic, basil, salt and pepper.  Cover with wax paper.
Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 5 minutes.  Meanwhile, in
cup combine wine and cornstarch, stir into tomato mixture.
Place chicken breasts, bone-side up and meatier portions
toward outside of utensil, on top of tomato mixture.  Cover
with wax paper; microwave at HIGH 5 minutes.  Reduce power
to MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) and cook 10 minutes per pound.
Halfway through cooking time, turn chicken breasts over and
stir tomato mixture.  After cooking, let stand, covered, 10
minutes.
Remove chicken to serving platter; stir parsley into tomato
mixture and spoon some over breasts; serve remaining sauce
on side.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 347. Protein 63 grams. Carbohydrate 13 grams. Fat
4 grams. Cholesterol 152 mg. Sodium 283 mg.

CHICKEN RATATOUILLEMakes 6 drumsticks.
When "ratatouille" appears in a recipe's name, you can be
sure it will have eggplant in it and probably tomatoes and
peppers as well.  These vegetables will be noticeably more
delicious if you use them very fresh rather than after
storage in the refrigerator. The flavor of these vegetables
all deteriorate at refrigerator temperatures.  They're warm
weather crops and nature didn't mean for them to be in the
chilling temperatures of a refrigerator.
6 chicken drumsticks
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 cup coarsely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 pound eggplant, peeled and cubed
2 medium zucchini (about 1/2 pound) cubed
2 medium tomatoes, coarsely chopped
1 green pepper, cut in thin 1-inch strips
1 tablespoon minced, fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh oregano or 1/4 teaspoon dried
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
Remove and discard skin and visible fat from drumsticks.
In large skillet, over medium-heat, heat oil.  Add
drumsticks; cook about 15 minutes, turning until browned on
all sides.  Remove drumsticks; drain on paper towels.  Add
onion and garlic; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently.  Add
eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, green pepper, basil, oregano
and pepper.  Cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Place
drumsticks in vegetable mixture; cook about 30 minutes
longer or until drumsticks are tender,  occasionally
spooning vegetables over chicken.

Nutritional Figures Per Drumstick
Calories 126. Protein 12 grams. Carbohydrate 8 grams. Fat 6
grams. Cholesterol 33 mg. Sodium 41 mg.

CHICKEN IN MUSTARD SAUCEServes 4
If controlling sodium is important to you, use an ordinary
table wine for the white wine called for in this recipe.
Cooking wines often contain salt and should be avoided by
anyone who is watching sodium intake.  Likewise, sweet
wines and fortified ones such as sherry, Madeira and
Marsala should be used sparingly because they are higher in
calories than dry wines.  No wines contain alcohol after
cooking.
1 roaster boneless breast or 1 package thin sliced roaster
breast
3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced (2 cups)
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
l tablespoon minced shallot or scallion
l/8 teaspoon ground pepper
l/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
l/4 cup dry white wine
l tablespoon Dijon mustard
Remove and discard visible fat from breast; slice thin.
(If using thin sliced product, skip this step.)  In a large
skillet over medium-high heat, heat 2 tablespoons oil.  Add
breast slices a few at a time, placing so that pieces do
not touch.  Saute 4 minutes, turning once, until chicken is
lightly browned on both sides.  Remove from skillet; keep
warm.
Heat remaining oil.  Add mushrooms, parsley, shallot and
pepper.  Stirring frequently, cook 2 minutes.  Stir in
broth and wine; bring to a boil and cook until liquid is
reduced by half (about 1/3 cup).  Reduce heat to low; stir
in mustard until well blended.  Spoon over chicken.

Nutritional Figures per Serving
Calories 286. Protein 37 grams.  Carbohydrate 4 grams.  Fat
13 grams.  Cholesterol 90 mg.  Sodium 201 mg.

CHICKEN VERONIQUEServes 4
Any recipe with the name Veronique will have grapes in it.
When buying grapes at the supermarket, you can tell how
fresh they are by how green and pliable the stem is.
Another way of telling is to give the bunch a quick shake.
If it's fresh, none of the individual grapes should fall
from the bunch.  I should warn you, though, that shaking
the bunch will not do anything for your popularity with the
store's produce manager.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster                        breast
1/2 lemon
Ground pepper
1 tablespoon unsalted margarine
1-1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 cup seedless green grapes, halved
Remove and discard any visible fat.  Butterfly breast
halves to make scaloppine.  Skip the previous step if you
are using thin sliced boneless roaster breasts. Rub with
lemon and sprinkle lightly with pepper.  In large skillet
over medium heat, melt margarine.  Add scaloppine, in
batches if necessary, so that they do not touch.  Saute 4
minutes, turning once, until chicken is lightly browned on
both sides and just cooked through.  Remove from skillet;
keep warm.
In small bowl, stir together cornstarch, broth and wine
until smooth; add to skillet.  Over medium heat, bring to
boil; boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Stir in grapes
until heated through.  To serve, spoon grapes and sauce
over chicken.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 233.  Protein 36 grams. Carbohydrate 9 grams.  Fat
5 grams.  Cholesterol 90 mg.  Sodium 87 mg.





CHICKEN  BREASTS WITH VEGETABLESServes 4
Whenever possible, choose crisp, fresh vegetables over
their canned or frozen counterparts.  Fresh vegetables have
better color, flavor and texture.  When using frozen or
canned products, be sure to look for those with no salt
added. This kind of nutritious, high vitamin, low calorie
meal that features breast meat is a mainstay for Frank and
me, and it has been for him for a long time. His grown
daughter, Bev Nida, tells me that one of her childhood
memories of Frank was that if he was late for dinner, ("and
he always was"), everyone knew to save a chicken breast for
him.

4 chicken breasts halves
2 tablespoons unsalted margarine
2 large carrots, cut into matchstick strips (1-1/2 cups)
2 ribs celery, cut into matchstick strips (1-1/2 cups)
1 green pepper, cut into matchstick strips (1 cup)
1 small shallot, minced
1 cut low-sodium chicken broth
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Remove and discard skin and visible fat from chicken
breasts.  In large skillet over medium heat, melt
margarine.  Add chicken, cook 10 to 15 minutes, turning
until browned on all sides.  Remove chicken; drain on paper
towels.  Add carrot, celery, green pepper, and shallot;
cook stirring constantly, 2 minutes.  Remove vegetables;
set aside.  Stir in broth and pepper; add chicken.  Reduce
heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes or until chicken
is cooked through.
Remove breasts to serving plate; keep warm. In cup, stir
together water and cornstarch until smooth; stir into
skillet.  Over medium heat, bring to boil; boil 1 minute,
stirring constantly.  Stir in vegetables ; cook until
heated through.  To serve, spoon vegetables over chicken.
Nutritional Figures Per Serving

Calories 380. Protein 62 grams. Carbohydrate 9 grams. Fat 9
grams. Cholesterol 152 mg. Sodium 201 mg.

CHICKEN STROGANOFFServes 4
This is a 1990s version of a nineteenth-century Russian
classic. By substituting plain, lowfat yogurt for sour
cream, you're decreasing the calories in this recipe by 332
calories.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster        breast
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
1/2 pound mushrooms, thinly sliced (2 cups)
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 container (8-ounces) plain low-fat yogurt
hot cooked noodles, cooked without salt
Remove and discard visible fat from chicken; slice chicken
in thin strips.  In large skillet over medium heat, heat 1
tablespoon oil.  Add onions; cook 2 minutes, stirring
frequently.  Add mushrooms; cook 3 minutes longer.  Remove
vegetables from skillet; set aside.  Heat remaining oil in
skillet.  Add chicken and garlic; cook 3 minutes or until
chicken turns white, stirring frequently.  Return
vegetables to skillet; add broth and pepper.

In cup, blend water and cornstarch; stir into skillet.
Over medium heat, bring to a boil; boil 1 minute, stirring
constantly.  Remove from heat; stir in yogurt until well
blended.  Heat gently over low heat (do not boil).  Serve
over noodles.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 427. Protein 65 grams. Carbohydrate 13 grams. Fat
12 grams. Cholesterol 155 mg. Sodium 182 mg.

CITRUS-MARINATED CHICKEN WINGSServes 3
Taste tests show that the parts of the bird that get the
most exercise, such as the wings, leg, and neck have the
deepest flavor.  The seasonings in this recipe bring out
the wonderful flavor of wings.
10 chicken wings
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
grated peel and juice of 1 lemon
grated peel and juice of 1 orange
2 cloves garlic, minced
6 whole cloves
2 bay leaves
Fold wing tips back to form triangles.  Place wings in
shallow baking pan.  In small saucepan, stir together
remaining ingredients and heat over medium heat 5 minutes.
Pour mixture over wings.  Cover; refrigerate several hours
or overnight.
Preheat oven to 400oF.  Bake wings 30 minutes or until
tender, basting occasionally.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 137. Protein 9 grams. Carbohydrate 2 grams. Fat 10
grams. Cholesterol 25 mg. Sodium 24 mg.

ROASTER BREAST A L'ORANGEServes 6
If you have a choice when buying the orange for this
recipe, buy a Valencia in preference to a Navel. Navel
oranges are excellent eating oranges, but they're not good
juice oranges; the juice develops an off flavor if not used
within half an hour. The Valencia, on the other hand, has a
more stable flavor in its juice form.
1 roaster breast
1-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
1-1/2 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar
Dash ground pepper
2/3 cup orange juice
2/3 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup julienne-cut orange peel strips
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Place breast skin-side up in
roasting pan; roast 45 minutes.  Meanwhile, in 2-quart
saucepan, stir together cornstarch, sugar and pepper.
Gradually stir in orange juice and broth until smooth.
Over medium heat, bring to a boil; boil 1 minute, stirring
constantly.  Remove from heat.  Stir in orange peel and
lemon juice.  Roast chicken, basting frequently with sauce
for 20 minutes longer or until juices run clear with no
hint of pink when a cut is made near the bone.  Heat
remaining sauce and serve with roaster breast.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 168. Protein 20 grams. Carbohydrate 9 grams. Fat 5
grams. Cholesterol 54 mg. Sodium 54 mg.

CORNISH HENS WITH MUSHROOMSServes 4
Skim milk contains all the calcium and protein of whole
milk.  Use it to make a prudent version of mushroom "cream"
sauce.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 pound mushrooms, halved or quartered
2 small onions, peeled and cut in thin wedges
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
2 bay leaves
1 cup skim milk
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Remove and discard any fat from cavities of hens.  In a 5-
quart Dutch oven or large deep skillet, over medium heat,
heat oil.  Add hens; cook about 20 minutes, turning to
brown on all sides.  Remove hens from pan and set aside.
Pour off all but 2 tablespoons drippings; stir in mushrooms
and onion.  Cook 3 minutes or until tender, stirring
occasionally.  Stir in broth, pepper and bay leaves.
Return hens to pan; reduce heat to medium low.  Cover and
simmer 45 minutes or until tender.  Remove hens to serving
platter and cut in half.  Discard bay leaves.  In cup,
blend milk and cornstarch until smooth; stir into liquid in
pan.  Over medium heat, bring to a boil; boil 1 minute,
stirring constantly.  Serve sauce with hens.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 446. Protein 38 grams. Carbohydrate 9 grams. Fat
28 grams. Cholesterol 111 mg. Sodium 151 mg.
CORNISH HENS WITH APPLE STUFFINGServes 4
Microwave Recipe
No extra cooking time is needed when you stuff fresh
Cornish game hens before microwaving.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
3 tablespoons unsalted margarine, divided
1 tart red apple, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 cup fresh whole-wheat bread cubes (2 slices)
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
2 tablespoons cider or apple juice divided
1/4 teaspoon paprika
Remove and discard any fat from cavities of hens.  Place 2
tablespoons margarine in a 4 cup glass container; microwave
at HIGH (100% power) 45 seconds.  Add apple, celery and
onion; cover with plastic wrap.  Microwave at HIGH (100%
power) 3 minutes, stirring once.  Stir in bread cubes,
poultry seasoning, pepper and 1 tablespoon cider.  Spoon
stuffing mixture lightly into cavities and close openings
with toothpicks.
Arrange hens, with legs pointing toward center, on
microwave-safe roasting utensil.  Place remaining 1
tablespoon margarine in custard cup; microwave at HIGH 25
seconds.  Stir in remaining 1 tablespoon cider and paprika;
brush mixture on hens.  Cover hens with wax paper.
Microwave at MEDIUM HIGH (70% power) 10 minutes per pound
(combined weight of both hens).  Let stand, covered, 10
minutes.  To serve, cut hens in half.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 436. Protein 35 grams. Carbohydrate 13 grams. Fat
26 grams. Cholesterol 110 mg. Sodium 170 mg.

CURRIED ROASTER DRUMSTICKSServes 4
In this recipe, you'll see vegetable oil instead of butter
or margarine or lard.  Solid fats contain saturated fat,
either because they came from animal sources (butter or
lard) or because they have been hydrogenated (shortening or
margarine).
5 roaster drumsticks
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium apples (diced 2 cups)
3/4 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1-1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
3 tablespoons cold water
1-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
Remove and discard skin and visible fat from drumsticks.
In large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add
drumsticks; cook about 15 minutes, turning until browned on
all sides.  Remove; drain on paper towels.  Pour off all
but 1 tablespoon fat.  Add apple, onion, garlic, curry,
ginger and pepper; cook 2 to 3 minutes, stirring
frequently.  Stir in broth. Return chicken to skillet;
reduce heat to medium low.  Simmer, uncovered, stirring
occasionally for 40 minutes or until chicken is tender and
cooked through.  Remove chicken to platter; keep warm.
In cup, blend water and cornstarch until smooth; stir into
skillet.  Over medium heat, bring to boil; boil 1 minute,
stirring occasionally.  Spoon sauce over chicken.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 207. Protein 17 grams. Carbohydrate 15 grams. Fat
9 grams. Cholesterol 51 mg. Sodium 74 mg.

GREEK LEMON CHICKENServes 4
This recipe adapts well to barbecuing.
1 chicken (3 pounds), quartered
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice (about 2 lemons)
2 tablespoons cold pressed (extra virgin) olive oil
1 medium-sized onion, sliced into thin rings
2 tablespoons minced fresh oregano or 2 teaspoons dried
2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Cayenne pepper to taste (optional)
Lemon wedges, fresh oregano and thyme leaves (optional
garnish)
Remove and discard visible fat from chicken.  In large,
shallow bowl, combine remaining ingredients except
garnishes.  Add chicken and marinate in refrigerator 30
minutes or longer.  Preheat broiler.  Drain chicken from
marinade; place on rack in broiler pan.  Broil chicken
quarters, 4 inches from heat, for 30 to 35 minutes or until
cooked through, turning and basting with marinade 3 to 4
times during cooking.  Add onion rings during last 10
minutes of broiling time.  Serve chicken with onion slices
and garnish with lemon wedges, and sprigs of fresh oregano
and thyme, if desired.

Nutritional figures per serving
Calories 389. Protein   38. Carbohydrate 5 grams. Fat 24
grams. Cholesterol 122 mg. Sodium 110 mg.

LEMON DRUMSTICKS AND THIGHSServes 4
Both the grill and the broiler are good friends to the
dieter because any fat that cooks out of your chicken just
drops away into the fire or pan below.  The juice and rind
from lemons help achieve tasty, no salt basting.
4 chicken drumsticks
4 chicken thighs
1/3 cup lemon juice
3 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon finely shredded lemon peel
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less)
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
Remove and discard
skin and visible fat from drumsticks and thighs. Place in
large, shallow dish.  In small bowl, stir together lemon
juice, water, oil, lemon peel, garlic, salt and pepper;
pour over chicken.  Cover; refrigerate several hours or
overnight, turning occasionally.
Prepare outdoor grill for cooking or preheat broiler.
Remove from marinade.  Grill 6 inches from source of heat
or broil indoors, cooking about 30 to 40 minutes or until
tender and golden brown; turn and baste frequently with
marinade.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 220. Protein 26 grams. Carbohydrate 2 grams. Fat
12 grams. Cholesterol 80 mg. Sodium 217 mg.

ORIENTAL CHICKEN AND VEGETABLESServes 4
Fresh garlic is definitely better than powdered garlic. If
you haven't been using it, give fresh garlic a try. Look
for garlic cloves with plump, firm heads that have a fresh
appearance.  The paper-like casing should be dry and should
completely cover the individual garlic cloves, and there
should be no trace of sprouting.  Store garlic in a cool,
dry place, but don't refrigerate it. I asked a garlic
grower why not, and he told me that cool temperatures can
increase the garlic's tendency to sprout.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
2 tablespoons cornstarch
Ground pepper to taste
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth at room temperature
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons sliced scallions
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup diagonally sliced carrots (about 2 medium)
1 cup snow peas
1 cup well-drained bean sprouts
1 can (8-ounces) sliced water chestnuts, drained
hot cooked rice (cooked without salt)
Trim visible fat from thighs; cut chicken in thin strips.
In small bowl, stir together cornstarch and pepper.
Gradually stir in broth and soy sauce until smooth; set
aside.  In wok or large skillet over medium-high heat, heat
oil.  Add green onions and garlic; stir-fry 30 seconds.
Add chicken and carrots; stir-fry 3 to 5 minutes or until
chicken turns white and carrots are tender crisp.  Add snow
peas, bean sprouts and water chestnuts.  Stir-fry to heat
through.  Re-stir cornstarch mixture; add to wok.  Over
medium heat, bring to a boil; boil l minute, stirring
constantly.  Serve over rice.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 304. Protein 28 grams. Carbohydrate 17 grams. Fat
13 grams. Cholesterol 73 mg. Sodium 268 mg.

PASTA PRIMAVERA WITH CHICKENServes 6
Because freshly grated Parmesan cheese has a more intense
flavor than pre-grated cheese, you can use less of it, and
in the process, you'll be saving on both fat and calories.
When I'm cooking pasta for Frank, I omit both the oil and
salt called for in the directions on the pasta package. If
we're having guests, though, I use the salt and oil called
for in the package directions; people who aren't used to
low-fat, low-salt cooking would find it pretty bland
otherwise.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster        breast
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
4 scallions, cut in julienne strips (about 1/2 cup)
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 pound asparagus, peeled, cut in 2-inch pieces or julienne
zucchini (about 2 cups)
2 carrots, peeled, cut in julienne strips (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
1 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh oregano, or 1/2 teaspoon
dried
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 pound spaghetti, cooked, drained
1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Slice breast meat into thin strips.  In a large skillet,
over medium-high heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil.  Add
scallions and garlic; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently.
Add chicken; cook 2 to 3 minutes or until chicken turns
white, stirring constantly.  Remove chicken and vegetables;
set aside.  Heat remaining oil in skillet; add asparagus
and carrots and cook 2 minutes, stirring frequently.  Stir
in broth, wine, parsley, oregano and pepper; simmer 1 to 2
minutes or until vegetables are tender crisp.
Place spaghetti on large platter; top with chicken mixture.
Sprinkle with cheese.  Toss and serve.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 417. Protein 48 grams. Carbohydrate 34 grams. Fat
9 grams. Cholesterol 105 mg. Sodium 185 mg.
PINEAPPLE-MINTED ROASTERServes 8
Microwave Recipe
Fat attracts more microwave energy than muscle does. That's
good for you if you're on a low-fat diet because when you
microwave chicken, the fat will render out into the
drippings where you can easily discard it.
1 whole roaster (about 6 pounds)
1 can (20-ounces) pineapple chunks in their own juice
about 1/2 cup pineapple juice, orange juice, or water
1-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
5-6 small sprigs fresh mint or 1-1/2 teaspoons dried mint
leaves
2 tablespoons unsalted margarine, melted
Remove and discard any visible fat from roaster cavity.
Remove giblets.  Place, breast side down, on microwave-safe
roasting utensil.   Drain pineapple chunks, reserving juice
and chunks.  Add additional juice or water to reserved
juice to measure 1-1/2 cups.  Place cornstarch in 4-cup
glass container and gradually stir juice into cornstarch
until smooth.  Microwave at HIGH (100% power) 2 minutes;
stir and microwave 2 minutes longer or until mixture boils
and thickens.  Add mint (if using fresh mint, remove sprigs
after five minutes).  Remove 1/2 cup of mixture for glaze;
stir pineapple chunks into remaining mixture for sauce and
set aside.  Brush roaster with melted margarine; cover with
wax paper.
Microwave at MEDIUM-HIGH (70% power) 10 to 12 minutes per
pound, brushing with glaze several times during cooking.
Halfway through cooking time, turn roaster over, using
paper towels to protect hands.  Pour off drippings and
reserve, if desired.  Baste bird with glaze and cover again
with wax paper;  complete cooking.  Let stand, covered with
aluminum foil, 20 minutes.  (Standing time is important
even if Bird-Watcher Thermometer has popped.)  After
standing time, juice should run clear with no hint of pink
when thigh is pierced.  To reheat sauce, microwave at HIGH
for two minutes.  Serve hot sauce with roaster.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving:
Calories 343.  Protein 38 grams.  Carbohydrate 14 grams.
Fat 14 grams.  Cholesterol 107 mg.  Sodium 97 mg.
ROASTED CORNISH HENS WITH NEW POTATOESServes 4
When you combine tender-skinned new potatoes with Cornish
game hens, you have almost a complete meal in one pan.  Add
a fresh green vegetable to complete a wholesome menu.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
vegetable cooking spray
2 tablespoons unsalted margarine, melted
1 teaspoon minced shallot or scallion
1 and 1/2 teaspoons fresh rosemary or 1/2 teaspoon dried
ground pepper to taste
6 small new potatoes, quartered
16 pearl onions, peeled
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons cold water
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Preheat oven to 350oF.  With sharp knife or poultry shears,
cut hens lengthwise in half.  Remove and discard any
visible fat from cavity.  Spray shallow roasting pan
lightly with vegetable cooking spray.  Place hens skin-side
up in pan.  Stir together margarine and shallot; brush on
hens and sprinkle with rosemary and pepper.  Arrange
potatoes and onions around hens.  Cover pan with foil.
Bake 20 minutes.  Uncover and continue baking, basting
occasionally, 20 to 30 minutes or until hens and vegetables
are tender.  Remove to serving platter.  Cover with foil;
keep warm.
Pour pan drippings into measuring cup.  Allow to stand
several minutes until fat drippings separate from hen
juices; discard fat.  Return hen juices to roasting pan;
add broth.  Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring up
brown bits from bottom of pan.  In cup, blend water and
cornstarch until smooth;  stir into broth mixture.  Bring
to a boil; boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Serve gravy
with hens and vegetables.
Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 463. Protein 38 grams. Carbohydrate 25 grams. Fat
23 grams. Cholesterol 110 mg. Sodium 129 mg.

ROASTER PAPRIKASHServes 8
This comment has nothing to do with this recipe, but I'm
slipping it in here because I thought you might like to
know about it!  Fitness declines if you exercise two days
or less each week.  Fitness is maintained if you exercise
three days a week.  Fitness is improved if you exercise
four or more days a week.
1 whole roaster (about 6 pounds)
1/4 cup vegetable oil
8 small white onions, peeled
4 carrots, peeled and quartered
1-1/4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons paprika, divided
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
Remove and discard any visible fat from cavity.   Remove
giblets, tie legs together and fold wings back.  Fasten
neck with wooden pick or small skewer.  In 8-quart saucepot
over medium heat, heat oil.  Add roaster.  Cook about 30
minutes, turning until browned on all sides.  Remove and
set aside.  Add onions and carrots; cook 3 minutes,
stirring frequently.  Remove vegetables.  Pour off fat and
stir in broth, 1 tablespoon paprika and pepper.  Return
roaster to saucepot; sprinkle with remaining paprika.
Arrange onions and carrots around roaster.  Reduce heat to
medium low; cover and simmer 1 hour or until roaster juices
run clear with no hint of pink when thigh is pierced and
vegetables are tender.
Remove roaster and vegetables to serving platter; keep
warm.  In cup, blend water and cornstarch until smooth;
stir into liquid in saucepot.  Bring to a boil over medium
heat; boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Remove from
heat; add yogurt and stir until well blended and smooth.
Heat gently over low heat; do not boil.  Serve sauce with
roaster and vegetables.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 387. Protein 41 grams. Carbohydrate 12 grams. Fat
19 grams. Cholesterol 109 mg. Sodium 142 mg.

TANDOORI CORNISH HENSServes 4
Fresh Cornish game hens contain even less fat and fewer
calories than larger poultry and are close in size and
flavor to the chickens traditionally used for India's
Tandoori Chicken.  If you want a barbecue version of this,
using chicken breasts, look for "Boneless Breasts Tandoori"
in Chapter Five.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1/3 cup plain yogurt
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 tablespoon curry powder
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons minced fresh gingerroot
1 teaspoon grated lime peel
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon paprika
With sharp knife or poultry shears, cut hens lengthwise in
half.  Remove and discard any visible fat from cavities.
Place hens in large shallow baking dish.  In small bowl,
stir together remaining ingredients; brush on all sides of
hens.  Cover; refrigerate several hours or overnight to
marinate.
Preheat oven to 400oF.  Place hens on rack in shallow
baking pan; brush with marinade.  Bake 15 minutes.  Reduce
oven temperature to 350oF; bake 20 to 25 minutes longer or
until chicken is tender and juices run clear with no hint
of pink when thigh is pierced with a fork.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving:
Calories 384. Protein 36 grams. Carbohydrate 4 grams. Fat
24 grams. Cholesterol 111 mg. Sodium 124 mg.

TARRAGON ROASTED CHICKENServes 4
Make a light, clear pan gravy for chicken by removing fat
from drippings and using cornstarch instead of flour to
thicken; 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 2 tablespoons flour.
1 whole chicken (about 3 pounds)
3 tablespoons unsalted margarine
1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon or 1-1/2 teaspoons dried
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
4 sprigs fresh parsley
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons dry white wine
1 tablespoon cornstarch
Remove and discard any visible fat from cavity of chicken.
Remove giblets.  Preheat oven to 350oF.  In small saucepan,
over medium heat, melt margarine; stir in tarragon and
pepper.  Place parsley and garlic in cavity of chicken; tie
legs together.  Place chicken, breast-side up, in roasting
pan; brush with tarragon mixture.  Roast, brushing
occasionally with remaining tarragon mixture, for about 1
1/2 hours or until juices run clear with no hint of pink
when thigh is pierced.  Remove chicken to serving platter;
keep warm.
Pour pan drippings into measuring cup.  Allow to stand
several minutes until clear fat drippings separate from
chicken juices; discard fat drippings.  Return chicken
juices to roasting pan; add broth.  In cup, blend wine and
cornstarch; stir into roasting pan.  Over medium heat,
bring to a boil, stirring up brown bits from bottom of pan;
boil 1 minute.  Serve gravy with chicken.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 407. Protein 39 grams. Carbohydrate 3 grams. Fat
25 grams. Cholesterol 122 mg. Sodium 124 mg.

THYME THIGHSServes 4
Wine is a flavor bargain, if you're counting calories. The
alcohol calories in this recipe will evaporate away, but
the flavor of the wine remains.
6 chicken thighs
2 tablespoons flour
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon fresh, minced thyme or 1 teaspoon dried
1/2 cup dry white wine
Remove skin from thighs and trim visible fat.  On wax
paper, combine flour, nutmeg, and pepper.  Coat thighs with
flour mixture.  Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high
heat.  Add thighs and cook 10 to 15 minutes or until
lightly browned, turning once.  Sprinkle thyme on chicken
and pour wine on top.  Cover, reduce heat to medium low and
cook 30 minutes or until chicken is tender.

Nutritional Figures Per Serving
Calories 235. Protein 24 grams. Carbohydrate 4 grams. Fat
13 grams. Cholesterol 71 mg. Sodium 66 mg.

CRUNCHY BAKED DRUMSTICKSServes 4
The grated lemon peel and the pepper can minimize the need
for salt in this recipe.  If you're on a low salt diet,
skip the salt.
6 chicken drumsticks
1 egg white, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons lowfat milk
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup crunchy nut-like cereal nuggets or bran flakes,
crushed (Grapenuts)
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
Vegetable cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350oF.  In shallow bowl, beat together egg
white, milk, salt and pepper.  On waxed paper, combine
cereal and lemon peel.  Roll drumsticks evenly in egg white
mixture, then in cereal mixture, turning to coat well.

Spray a rectangular baking dish or cookie sheet with
vegetable cooking spray.  arrange drumsticks in dish in a
single layer.  Bake 50 to 60 minutes or until cooked
through and golden.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 294. Protein 26 grams. Fat 10 grams. Carbohydrate
25 grams. Sodium 535 mg. Cholesterol 74.

CAPE COD CHICKEN BREASTSServes 4
The cranberries called for in this recipe are available in
your supermarket produce section from September through
November.  If you want to have cranberries available for
use at another time of the year, buy them when they're
available and then freeze them in the bag they came in, but
enclose that bag in a freezer bag so the berries are double
wrapped. They'll stay in good condition for about nine
months.
4 chicken breast halves
ground pepper to taste
1 to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil or margarine
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1-1/2 cups fresh or frozen, thawed cranberries
3/4 cup orange juice
2 to 3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon grated fresh orange peel
pinch nutmeg
Removed skin, and season chicken on both sides with pepper.
In a large skillet, over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add
chicken breasts and cook for 4 to 5 minutes per side until
golden brown.  Add onion; cook 2 minutes longer, stirring
often.  Add cranberries, orange juice, sugar, orange peel
and nutmeg.  Stir to scrape up bits from bottom of skillet;
bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and cook
20 to 25 minutes longer or until chicken is tender and
cranberries are soft, stirring occasionally.  Remove
chicken to warm platter; keep warm.  Transfer cranberry
mixture from skillet to food processor or blender; cover
and puree until almost smooth.  To serve, pour sauce over
chicken.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 514. Protein 48 grams. Fat 26 grams. Carbohydrate
20 grams. Sodium 144 mg. Cholesterol 145 mg.

MEDITERRANEAN CHICKEN BREASTSServes 4
Fresh garlic, stored in a cool, dry place will last about
as long as a fresh onion.  If the cloves start to sprout,
you can still use them, but they won't be quite as
flavorful.
4 chicken breast halves
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
 ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup dry red wine
4 fresh or canned plum tomatoes, seeded and coarsely
chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/2 cup pitted black olives, cut in half
1/4 cup minced, fresh parsley
Remove skin from chicken breasts. In a large skillet, over
medium heat, heat 1 tablespoon oil.  Add chicken breasts
and cook for 5 minutes until golden, turning once.  Add
more oil if necessary.  Stir in wine, tomatoes, garlic,
basil and marjoram; bring to a boil.   Reduce heat to low;
cover and simmer 20 to 25 minutes or until chicken is
almost cooked through.  Uncover; increase heat to medium-
high and cook 5 minutes longer or until liquid is reduced
by one-third.  Stir in olives and parsley; heat through.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 480. Protein 48 grams. Fat 30 grams. Carbohydrate
4 grams. Sodium 276 mg. Cholesterol 145 mg.

 INDONESIAN CHICKEN KEBOBS WITH CURRIED YOGURT DIP   Serves
4
You can use bottled lime juice in this recipe, but it lacks
the spark that fresh lime juice has. Also, you can lower
the sodium content still further by using light soy sauce.
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon brown or white sugar
1 garlic clove, crushed
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/4 cup chopped scallions
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 teaspoon oriental sesame oil, optional

In a shallow bowl, combine lime juice, soy sauce, vegetable
oil, sugar and garlic; mix well.  Add chicken, turning to
coat with marinade.  Cover and refrigerate 1 hour.

Meanwhile, in small bowl, combine yogurt, scallions, curry
powder and sesame oil.  Cover and refrigerate until ready
to use.

Remove chicken from marinade and cut into 3/4-inch cubes;
reserve marinade.  On each of 10 to 12 skewers, thread 4 to
5 chicken cubes.  Preheat broiler.  Place skewers in
broiler pan; broil 4 inches from heat source 8 to 10
minutes until cooked through, turning once and brushing
occasionally with marinade.  Serve kebobs with curried
yogurt dip.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 234. Protein 35 grams. Fat 6 grams. Carbohydrate 8
grams. Sodium 645 grams. Cholesterol 82 mg.

POACHED CHICKEN IN CREAMY LEMON SAUCEServes 4
I'm fond of this recipe because the texture is creamy and
it doesn't use cream.
4 boneless, skinless, chicken breast halves
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup white wine
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1 cup lowfat milk
1-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley, optional

Season chicken with pepper.  In a large, deep skillet over
medium-high heat, combine broth, wine, lemon juice and
lemon peel; bring to a boil.  Add chicken; reduce heat to
medium-low.  Cover and simmer 12 to 15 minutes or until
chicken is cooked through.  Transfer chicken to a warm
serving plate and keep warm.
In a small bowl, blend milk, cornstarch and mustard until
smooth; stir into simmering liquid in skillet.  Increase
heat to medium; cook until mixture boils and thickens,
stirring constantly.  Return chicken to skillet; coat well
with sauce.  Sprinkle with parsley, if desired.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 205. Protein 34 grams. Fat 4 grams. Carbohydrate 7
grams. Sodium 201 Cholesterol 84 mg.

CHICKEN AND BELL PEPPER SAUTEServes 4
This recipe is prettiest when made with red, green, and
yellow bell peppers. However, your supermarket may not have
the red and yellow ones available, in which case,
substitute green ones.  Incidentally, red bell peppers
started out as green bell peppers, but as they matured,
their color changed from green to red.
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
ground pepper to taste
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 small red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
1 small green bell pepper, cut into thin strips
1 small yellow bell pepper, cut into thin strips

Place chicken breasts between sheets of plastic wrap and
pound to 1/4 inch thickness.  Sprinkle both sides of
chicken with cumin, oregano and pepper to taste, pressing
to make seasonings adhere.

In large skillet, over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add
chicken; saute 1 to 2 minutes per side or until almost
cooked through.  Remove chicken to warm platter; keep warm.

Add garlic and pepper strips to drippings in skillet; stir-
fry one minute.  Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and cook
3 minutes or until peppers are tender-crisp.  Return
chicken to skillet, spooning pepper mixture on top.  Cover
and cook 3 to 5 minutes longer until vegetables are tender
and chicken is completely cooked through.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 209. Protein 32 grams. Fat 7 grams. Carbohydrate 3
grams. Sodium 91 grams. Cholesterol 79 mg.

CHICKEN NORMANDYServes 4
If they're available, choose Rome Beauty apples for this
recipe.  Romes have a somewhat flat, mealy taste when eaten
raw, but their flavor develops a wonderful richness when
cooked. They're available from October until early Summer.
The Golden Delicious, the Cortland, the Jonathan, and the
Granny Smith are also good for baking. The Red Delicious
apples, by the way, are only fair for cooking.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces (about 3 pounds)
Ground pepper to taste
vegetable cooking spray
2 medium apples, cored and sliced
1 large onion, sliced
1/2 cup apple cider or juice
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 teaspoons brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

Preheat oven to 350F.  Sprinkle chicken pieces with pepper
to taste.

Spray 13 by 9-inch baking dish with vegetable cooking
spray.  Arrange chicken in baking dish; scatter apple and
onion slices around and on top of chicken.  In cup, combine
cider, lemon juice, oil, sugar and allspice; pour over
chicken.  Bake, uncovered, for about 1 hour or until
chicken is cooked through and apples are tender, turning
pieces once during cooking and basting occasionally with
drippings.  To serve, remove chicken from pan juices and
spoon apples and onions on top.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 609. Protein 44 grams. Fat 39 grams. Carbohydrate
20 grams. Sodium 166 mg. Cholesterol 174 mg.

BALSAMIC CHICKEN AND MUSHROOMSServes 4
If you can find balsamic vinegar, buy it!  I've included
red wine vinegar in case you can't find balsamic vinegar,
but the balsamic vinegar is terrific in this recipe, and
it's worth having on hand for salad dressings afterwards.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces (about 3 pounds)
Ground pepper to taste
paprika
1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 tablespoons chopped shallots or scallions
2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms (about 1/2 pound)
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons balsamic or red wine vinegar

Preheat oven to 350F.  In large baking dish, place
chicken, skin-side up; brush with 1/2 to 1 tablespoon oil
and sprinkle with pepper and paprika to taste.  Bake 40
minutes. Pour off and discard pan juices.

Meanwhile, in medium skillet over medium-high heat, heat
remaining oil.  Add shallots; saute 2 minutes until
slightly softened.  Stir in mushrooms; cook 2 minutes
longer until lightly browned, stirring constantly. Add
broth and vinegar; reduce heat to medium, and cook 3
minutes or until mushrooms are tender and liquid is
slightly reduced.  Pour mushroom mixture over chicken; bake
20 to 25 minutes longer until chicken is cooked through,
basting occasionally with pan drippings.  Serve chicken
with mushroom sauce.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 568. Protein 44 grams. Fat 41 grams. Carbohydrate
3 grams. Sodium 290 mg. Cholesterol 174 mg.

HARVEST CHICKEN DINNERServes 8
Acorn squash is high in vitamin A. A single serving will
more than meet your Recommended Daily Allowance for this
vitamin.
1 whole roaster (about 6 pounds)
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 teaspoons dried rosemary leaves, crushed
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 large acorn squash

Preheat oven to 350oF.  Remove and discard and visible fat
from roaster cavity.  Remove giblets.  Tie drumsticks
together and fold wings back.  Place chicken in roasting
pan.  In small bowl, combine wine, sugar, vinegar, oil,
rosemary, Worcestershire; brush mixture on roaster,
covering entire surface.  Roast chicken 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, cut squash into quarters; remove seeds.  After
45 minutes cooking time, arrange squash in roasting pan
around chicken; fill cavities with a little rosemary
mixture.  Roast chicken, basting occasionally 1 1/4 to 1
3/4 hours longer (depending on weight) or until juices run
clear with no hint of pink when thigh is pierced.

To serve, slice chicken with degreased pan juices and
accompany with squash.

Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 574. Protein 49 grams. Fat 31 grams. Carbohydrate
24 grams. Sodium 162 mg. Cholesterol 153 mg.

CAJUN SPICED ROASTER 8
If roasters aren't available in your area, you can use a
regular whole chicken, adjusting the cooking time.
However, roasters are juicier and tenderer and more
flavorful, so if you've got a choice, go for a roaster.
1 whole roaster (about 6 pounds)
1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons dried thyme
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 to 1 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
2 celery ribs, sliced (leaves included)
1 onion, quartered
1/4 cup parsley sprigs
1/2 lemon
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Preheat oven to 350F.  Remove and discard any visible fat
from roaster cavity.  Remove giblets.  Rub roaster inside
and out with lemon; brush oil evenly over skin.

In small bowl, combine thyme, black pepper, salt, red
pepper, and garlic.  Rub some of mixture into cavity of
roaster; stuff with celery, onion and parsley.  Skewer or
tie cavity closed and fold back wings.  Rub remaining herb
and spice mixture evenly into skin of roaster, covering
entire surface.

Place chicken in roasting pan.  Roast 2 1/4 to 2 3/4 hours
(depending on weight)or until juices run clear with no hint
of pink when thigh is pierced.  Baste occasionally with pan
drippings.

To serve, remove celery, onion and parsley from cavity of
roaster; discard.  Skim fat from pan drippings and discard;
reserve pan juices.  Slice roaster and serve with pan
juices.
Nutrition Figures per Serving
Calories 478. Protein 49 grams. Fat 29 grams. Carbohydrate
3 grams. Sodium 473. Cholesterol 153









Chapter Four$Chicken For Children

This chapter is going to be about cooking for and by
kids, but I got the idea for it when I was thinking about
something entirely different. I was idly wondering, "When
is Frank the absolute happiest and most content?"  Part of
me instantly wanted to answer, "When working, of course."
I believe that for him business is pleasure. If it's a busy
time, he'll happily get along for weeks at a time on four
hours sleep and work the rest except for meals. When it
gets really busy, I've seen him get by on two hours$and
still relish the work.

But there are certainly other things he enjoys.  He's
an avid baseball fan and the best Father's Day gift I think
he ever got was tickets to go to one of the Oriole games
with his son Jim and grandson Ryan. He also loves dancing
(his nickname years ago used to be "twinkle toes").

Still, I think the time that he looks the most relaxed
and content and generally pleased with life is when the
four children and twelve grandchildren are here.  They're
scattered from Maine to Virginia, so we don't get them
often, but when we do, it's an occasion.  And it's one when
I want to have food that I can count on the kids' liking.

Here are some of the principles of cooking for young
children that  I've learned from the Perdue home economists
and from Cooperative Extension. I'm guessing that if you
have kids, you know their preferences pretty well, but if
you're entertaining other kids, these tips may come in
handy.

_Finger foods such as chicken nuggets are always a
hit. I keep a carton or two on hand for a never-fail snack
food for kids$or grown-ups.

_Young children often prefer uncomplicated tastes.
While some may go for elaborate sauces, it's safest to cook
chicken by quickly sauteing it in your frying pan, and then
have any of the grown-up's sauces available for the kids to
use as an optional dip.

_Avoid highly seasoned foods for kids unless you know
they're used to them.

_Frequently young children like uniform textures.
Casseroles with hard and soft textures would be riskier
than, say, a straightforward boned chicken breast.

_Pieces cut from a cooked Cornish hen can be a real
treat for a small child.  He or she eats the child-size
portion, breast or leg, while the grown-ups eat regular
size broiler breast or drumsticks.

_My friends in Cooperative Extension tell me that the
latest scientific research suggests thinking of a balanced
diet in terms of several days rather than just a rigid 24-
hour period.  That means that if one of the kids in your
care goes on a chicken-eating jag or a peanut butter jag or
a not-eating jag, don't worry;  it's ok as long as in the
course of several days he or she is
getting a balanced diet.  Knowing this can make meal time a
lot more relaxed.

Cooking with school age kids can be a lot of fun, as
long as it's presented as a treat instead of a chore.  You
might, for a start, get them involved in planning the
week's menu.  I know some families who allow each child to
pick the main dish for one meal a week. Older children
actually get to cook their choice. My daughter-in-law, Jan
Perdue, suggests getting kids to pick out meals with an
ethnic or international theme so that mealtime is a time to
explore other cultures as well as a time to eat.

Many of the recipes in this chapter are not only
popular with kids, they're designed to be easy and fun for
them to make. When your kids are trying these recipes, how
about teaching them some of the food preparation tips that
will be useful to them for the rest of their lives?

When I'm cooking with kids, my first concern is food
safety. I explain to them that in most cases food-borne
illnesses don't make you violently sick (although they
can); the usual episode is more likely to be simple
queasiness or a headache or feeling under the weather and
not knowing quite why. To avoid these nuisance illnesses as
well as the possibility of more serious ones, the number
one rule is:

_Wash your hands and all utensils before and after
touching any raw meat.

Here are some other food preparation tips that kids
should know:

_Before starting to cook, read the recipe carefully
and gather all ingredients and equipment.

_Don't wear loose, floppy clothing or sleeves that are
too long.  Tie back hair if it gets in the way.

_When using a sharp knife, cut on a cutting board and
point the knife away from your body.

_If you're walking around with a knife, hold it so the
blade is pointed toward the floor and away from your body.

_Make sure you know how to light your stove.  If a gas
burner or oven doesn't light, turn the knob to "off" and
ask an adult for help.  Electric burners remain hot even
after they're turned off, so don't touch!

_When removing lids from cooking pots, point them away
from you to prevent steam burns.

_Don't let pot handles extend over the edge of the
stove or counter$a little brother or sister could grab the
handle and pull it down on his or her head.

_Never stick anything into an electric mixer or
blender while it's running.

_Don't let any part of your potholder touch the
burner; it could catch  fire.

_Clean up as you go along$and don't forget the cutting
board.

_Double check that stove and appliances are turned off
before you leave the  kitchen.  Make a habit of turning off
the burner before removing your pan, that way you won't
forget.

_Never be embarrassed to ask for help. That's how we
learn.

Personally, I love having kids in the kitchen.  I like
the bustle and hubbub, and even though I know, as I'm sure
you do too, that we parents could probably do things a lot
faster without their "help," that's not the point.  The
point is being together and doing things together and
having fun together.
ALLISON'S CHIX IN A BLANKET

At age 8, our granddaughter Allison Perdue, loves to
make these.  She tells me that her 6-year old brother can
make them too.  She got the recipe from summer camp, but
changed the main ingredient to Frank's franks.  If you
can't find Frank's franks, use any chicken hot dog.  It
will have much less fat than regular franks.  I've watched
Ally make these, and sometimes the biscuits stay wrapped
around the frank, and sometimes they open during cooking.
Ally says they're okay either way.
2 biscuits from a tube of buttermilk refrigerator biscuits,
uncooked
1 chicken frank
1 tablespoon of grated cheddar cheese, or more, to taste
Lay the biscuits side by side with the sides touching.
Pinch together the parts that are touching and then, using
your palms or a rolling pin, press or roll the biscuits
into a single rectangle that's hot dog shaped, only wider.
Lay a frank on the dough and then sprinkle the frank with
the cheese. Pierce frank in several places with fork. Wrap
the dough around the frank, pinch closed, and then bake
according to the directions for cooking the biscuits.
BBQ "SPARERIBS" Makes 40, Serves 8-10
One of my favorite commercials is of Frank introducing the
Perdue Chicken Franks.  It starts out with Frank in front
of a hot dog stand calling out, "Hot dogs only 25 cents."
A young kid who's been made up to have a large nose and
ears just like Frank's, says, "Only 25 cents for a hot dog?
How good could it be?" Frank answers, "I'm making it easy
for people to try Perdue Chicken Franks."  The kid answers,
"Chicken Franks? Free would be a lot easier."  When Frank
answers that his franks cost less and have 25% less fat,
the kid answers, "All right, I'll bite," and then says,
"Tastes as good a real hot dog."  Frank looks at the kid,
with his Perdue-shaped nose and ears, and says, "This kid's
got good taste and good looks."   These "spareribs" also
taste good and look good.
8 chicken franks
1-1/4 cups prepared barbecue sauce
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
1 teaspoon mustard
Slice each frank on the diagonal into 5 pieces.  In a large
bowl, combine remaining ingredients.  Add frank slices and
toss gently to coat well.
Arrange coated franks in single layer on baking sheet and
place under broiler 2 minutes.  Turn and broil 2 minutes
longer, or until franks are golden brown.  Watch carefully
to avoid burning.
Serve with toothpicks, if desired.

BETSY'S BEST-"GETTI" Serves 6-8
You can make this even simpler by using canned spaghetti.
Also, if you top the casserole with thin slices of
mozzarella and heat it until the mozzarella melts, you'll
get a gloppy, stretchy, chewing-gum-like topping that kids
will adore if they're into being messy. Mine love it.
8 chicken franks
1 pound spaghetti
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/2 clove garlic, minced
1 can (8-ounces) tomato sauce
1 can (16-ounces) whole tomatoes, chopped with liquid
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh basil or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
Grated Parmesan cheese
Slice franks into thin rounds. In large kettle, over high
heat,  bring 3-1/2 quarts salted water to boil.  Add
spaghetti, stir and cook until tender.  Drain and place in
large bowl.
In a medium saucepan over medium heat, heat oil.  Add
garlic and onion and cook for 3 minutes, stirring often.
Add tomatoes and liquid, sauce and herbs.  Stir and add
franks.  Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium-low and
simmer 5 minutes.
Pour sauce over spaghetti, toss to combine.  Serve with
Parmesan cheese.
BIG TOP CORN DOGSServes 8
Because this involves deep fat frying, it's probably best
cooked by adults or mature teenagers only, but the end
result will impress your kids.
8 chicken franks
1/4 cup flour
1 package (8-ounces) corn muffin mix
2 eggs
1 cup milk
vegetable oil for deep frying
8 wooden lollipop or caramel-apple sticks
Pierce each frank in several places with a fork.  Roll in
flour and set aside.
In a mixing bowl combine corn muffin mix, eggs and milk;
mix thoroughly.  In large fryer or deep, heavy skillet,
heat 1 1/2 inches of vegetable oil to 375oF or until bread
cube sizzles in it.
Dip each frank in batter, coating evenly.  Place gently
into oil; cook 3-4 at one time, turning until golden brown
all over.  Drain on paper towels.
Place corn dogs on lightly-oiled shallow baking sheet and
bake at 375oF for 8 minutes or until thoroughly heated.
Insert stick at least 2-inches into corn dog.  Serve with
mustard and ketchup.
CHICKEN DIVANServes 4-6
This is an easy recipe for a kid when he or she is in
charge of making dinner for the family.
1 package (10-ounces) frozen broccoli, uncooked
2 packages fully cooked chicken breast tenders
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) cream of celery soup, undiluted
1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
Preheat oven to 400oF.  Place broccoli across bottom of
baking dish; sprinkle with salt.  Arrange chicken tenders
in a  layer on top of broccoli.  Pour soup over chicken.
Sprinkle with cheese.  Bake, uncovered for 20-30 minutes or
until broccoli is just tender.
CHICKEN PIZZAS Serves 3
If you want something unusual for the teenagers, this is
it.  It's tasty and not much trouble.
6 chicken drumsticks
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) pizza sauce
1 cup grated Mozzarella cheese
1 package (10-ounces) refrigerated Parkerhouse rolls
(unbaked)
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Pour pizza sauce in small bowl.
Dip chicken in sauce; place on baking sheet.  Bake,
uncovered, for 45 minutes.  Separate rolls and roll out one
at a time to 5-inch circle.  Dip chicken in pizza sauce
again and roll in cheese.  Place on round of dough; pull
dough around chicken and pinch together.  (Leave bony end
of drumstick uncovered for finger eating.)  Bake,
uncovered, approximately 30 minutes longer or until dough
is brown.
COZY KITTEN WHISKERSServes 16
A short cut for this is to use bread dough that comes in
tubes in the refrigerator section  of your supermarket.
16 chicken franks
1 package (13-3/4-ounces) hot roll mix
butter or margarine
Pierce each frank in several places with a fork.  To make
"whisker" on both ends of franks, lay frank on cutting
board and make 4-lengthwise cuts 1-1/2-inches from each
end.  Cut carefully, rotating frank, so that 8 "whiskers"
result.  Repeat with all franks.
Prepare hot roll mix according to package directions. Or
use the prepared bread dough that comes in tubes at the
supermarket. Divide into 16 equal portions and roll each on
lightly floured surface to 3 by 3-inch square.  Starting at
a corner, roll dough around middle of each frank, leaving
ends of franks exposed.
Place on buttered baking sheet, tucking dough tip under
frank.  Arrange "whiskers" fanned out.  Brush with melted
butter.  Bake in preheated 375oF oven for 12 to 15 minutes
until golden brown.  Serve with mustard and ketchup in
squeeze containers so children can "draw" faces.
CRISPY PEANUT BUTTER CHICKENServes 4
I once heard a professor at the University of California at
Davis argue that wine was the greatest cultural achievement
of mankind. He's wrong, of course.  It's really peanut
butter.  Or at least a lot of my young friends seem to
think so.  By the way, did you know that there are 540
peanuts in a 12-ounce jar of peanut butter?
The first time I made this recipe, I skipped the 1/4 cup
oil, just to see if I could save some calories.  Having
tried it, I don't recommend skipping any of the oil.  It
was too dry and crusty without it.
1 egg
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
1/4 cup milk
3/4 cup bread crumbs
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1/4 cup oil
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a mixing bowl beat egg and
peanut butter together; add salt and pepper.  Add milk
gradually, stirring well to blend.  Place bread crumbs on a
sheet of wax paper.  Dip chicken in peanut butter mixture
and roll in crumbs.  Place chicken, skin side up, in single
layer in shallow baking pan.  Pour oil over chicken.  Bake,
uncovered, at 350oF for 1 hour, or until cooked through.
CROISSANT DOGSServes 6-8
I don't think I can count the number of times my son Carlos
made this
as a teenager.  He's also served it to Frank.   Carlos and
I laugh over the idea of serving Frank's Franks to Frank.
8 chicken franks
1 package (8-ounces) crescent roll dough
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 slices Swiss cheese, 7x4-inches
1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water
1-1/2 teaspoons poppy seeds (optional)
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Pierce franks all over with tines
of fork.  Divide crescent rolls and place on lightly
floured surface.  Working with one piece of dough at a
time, fold tips of long side of triangle in to meet at
center.  Then stretch triangle lightly up toward point.
Cut cheese slices in half, then diagonally to form four
triangular pieces.  Brush dough with thin layer of mustard,
top with cheese, brush with mustard again.  Roll franks in
the dough, starting at the bottom and rolling toward the
point.  Place on ungreased baking sheet so they are not
touching.  Brush lightly with egg wash and sprinkle with
poppy seeds.  Place in the middle of the oven for 15 to 20
minutes or until dough is golden brown.
CRUNCHY MINI DRUMSTICKSServes 4
Young children love miniature versions of adult food, but
if you're serving this recipe to them, I recommend leaving
out the Worcestershire sauce.
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (optional)
3/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
2 cups whole wheat or seasoned bread crumbs
2 tablespoons unsweetened wheat germ (optional)
1/3 cup vegetable oil
9 chicken wings
paprika
Preheat oven to 400oF.  Place flour on wax paper. In
shallow bowl, beat eggs with Worcestershire sauce, salt and
pepper.  On another sheet of wax paper, combine bread
crumbs and wheat germ, if desired.
Pour oil into a shallow roasting pan or large shallow
baking dish and place in oven.  With sharp knife, divide
wings into 3 pieces, reserve bony wing tips to prepare
chicken broth.  Roll remaining "mini drumstick" pieces
first in flour, then in egg mixture, and finally in bread
crumbs.  Sprinkle with paprika and arrange in preheated
baking dish.
Bake 10 minutes, then turn with tongs and bake 10 minutes
longer.  Reduce heat to 350oF; cook 10 to 15 minutes longer
until crisp and golden brown.  Drain on paper towels and
serve warm or at room temperature.
DELI DOGSServes 6-8
Some teenagers love sauerkraut; some most definitely don't.
This is a great dish for those who do.
8 chicken franks
1 can (16-ounces) sauerkraut
3 cups Bisquick
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons prepared mustard (optional)
Flour
1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Pierce franks all over with tines
of fork.  Drain sauerkraut thoroughly by pressing between
two stacked dinner plates, then chop coarsely.  In a large
mixing bowl, combine Bisquick, sauerkraut and 2 teaspoons
of the caraway seeds.  Gradually add water and mix
vigorously until soft, slightly sticky dough forms.  Divide
dough in half.  Roll each half on a well-floured surface
into a 7x16-inch rectangle approximately 1/4-inch thick.
Cut each rectangle into four 7x4-inch pieces.  Brush center
of each piece of dough with a thin layer of mustard, if
desired, then brush the outer 1/2-inch of the rectangle
with egg wash.  Roll each frank loosely a piece of dough.
Tuck outer ends under and place seam-side down on lightly
greased baking sheet so they are not touching.  Brush
lightly with egg wash and sprinkle with remaining caraway
seeds.  Bake in middle of oven for 30 minutes or until
crust is golden brown.  Serve with more mustard and relish
if desired.
JALAPENO BURGERSServes 4-6
This is good for older teenagers. Young kids ones may find
the flavors too harsh.
1 package fresh ground chicken (about 1 pound)
2/3 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese with jalapeno peppers
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon salt
8 taco shells
1 tomato, thinly sliced
1 avocado, thinly sliced
1 cup salsa
Combine chicken and remaining seasonings.  Form into 8
burgers.  Grill or broil on lightly oiled surface 5 to 6-
inches from heat source 4 to 5 minutes per side until
burgers are cooked through.  Serve in heated taco shells
with slices of tomato and avocado.  Top with salsa.
MAPLE CRUNCH CHICKENServes 4
Maple syrup with chicken may seem a little unusual to
you$but it's really good.  Frank liked it so much that I've
served it to him several times, once substituting boneless
skinless chicken breasts. If you want to make that
substitution, shorten the cooking time to about twenty
minutes, or until a meat thermometer registers 170-175
degrees. Also, use instant oatmeal and toast it for a
couple of minutes in the oven first, to compensate for the
shorter time in the oven.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1 egg
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup uncooked oatmeal
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/3 cup oil
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a shallow bowl beat egg with
maple syrup.  Place oatmeal, salt and pepper on a sheet of
wax paper.  Dip chicken pieces in egg mixture, then oatmeal
mixture.  Pour oil in shallow baking pan.  Place chicken,
skin side down, in oil in baking pan; turn chicken pieces
to coat with oil; leave skin side up.  Bake, uncovered, for
approximately 1 hour, or until cooked through.
NACHO NIBBLESServes 6
I've made this recipe scattering the cheese and franks and
other ingredients over the tortilla chips haphazardly, and
I've also made it so that each individual tortilla chip has
its own slice of frank, its own chili and its own pepper
and cheese. The second way looks more impressive. The first
way is a lot easier. My son Jose likes to serve this at
parties with his college friends.
8 chicken franks
1 package (16 ounces) tortilla chips
2 cups chili
2 scallions, thinly sliced
1/2 cup diced green pepper, or mild to hot green chili
peppers
12 ounces grated Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Cut franks into thin slices.  Place
tortilla chips on large shallow baking pan and top with
frank slices.  Dab chili on top, then sprinkle with
scallions, peppers and cheese.
Bake nachos for 15 minutes or until cheese bubbles.
PHOTO:  Tucking chicken nuggets into pita pockets and
arranging vegetables are easy steps in teaching children...
- 5
NUGGETS IN A POCKETServes 4
This is an easy sandwich for teenagers to make.
1 package fully-cooked chicken breast nuggets
4 mini pita pockets
prepared Thousand Island dressing or Magic Mixture Sauce
(recipe follows)
1/2 cup shredded lettuce
8 cherry tomatoes, halved
Bake nuggets following package directions.  Slit top of
pita pockets.  Spoon 1 to 2 teaspoons sauce into each
pocket and fill with nuggets, lettuce, tomato and
additional sauce if desired.  Serve with Rick Rack Carrot
Sticks and Broccoli Trees (raw cut-up pieces of carrot and
broccoli).
Magic Mixture Sauce:
In small bowl, combine 1/4 cup mayonnaise, 1/4 cup ketchup,
1 tablespoon prepared French dressing, 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon
curry powder (optional), and 1-2 drops Tabasco (optional).
NUTTY BUDDY CHICKENServes 4
According to the Texas Peanut Producers' Board, we
Americans eat 4 million pounds of peanuts each day.  Tell
your kids that, as they help you chop the salted peanuts
for this recipe.
1 egg
2 tablespoons milk
1/3 cup all purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/3 cup bran buds
3/4 cup finely chopped salted peanuts
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1/2 cup melted butter or margarine
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a shallow bowl beat egg with
milk. Place flour, salt, pepper, bran buds and peanuts on a
sheet of wax paper and mix together.  Dip chicken pieces in
egg mixture; then flour mixture.  Place chicken in single
layer, skin side up, in shallow baking pan.  Pour melted
butter or margarine over chicken.  Bake, uncovered, for
about 1 hour or until cooked through.
PICNIC PACKET CHICKENMakes 4 packets
The whole picnic meal is ready to serve when these come out
of the oven -- and there are no portioning and serving
problems.  Children love this idea.  You can also cook this
on an outdoor grill.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
4 small raw carrots, cut in sticks
4 raw potatoes, quartered
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
4 teaspoons butter or margarine
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Tear off 4 pieces heavy duty
aluminum foil, approximately 18-inches square.  Place 1 or
2 pieces of chicken on each piece of foil. Put one carrot
and one potato on each piece of foil. Sprinkle salt, pepper
and oregano over all.  Add teaspoon of butter or margarine
to each.  Wrap tightly.   Bake for approximately 1 hour or
until chicken is cooked through.
POTATO CHIP DRUMSTICKSServes 4-6
These are wonderful for school lunch boxes. Since they're
stored in the freezer, you can take them out a meal at a
time and they'll defrost in the child's lunch box in time
to eat later in the day.
6 chicken drumsticks
1/3 cup whole wheat flour
1 container (8-ounces) plain yogurt (1 cup)
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/4 teaspoon curry powder (optional)
1 package (7-ounces) no-salt potato chips, crushed
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Grease a baking sheet.  Remove skin
from drumsticks.  In small bowl, combine yogurt, salt,
pepper and curry.  On wax paper, place crushed potato
chips.  Roll drumsticks first in yogurt mixture and then in
potato chips, pressing crumbs gently onto drumsticks to
coat thoroughly.
Arrange drumsticks on baking sheet and place in oven.
Reduce heat to 350oF and bake 45 to 50 minutes until crisp
and golden brown.  Chill drumsticks, uncovered, on baking
sheet.  Then wrap individually in foil and freeze.  If
desired, allow extra foil at ends of package and twist to
form a chicken.
To pack for lunch:  Freeze individual containers of juice
overnight.  Place frozen juice in lunch bag with well-
chilled or frozen foil-wrapped drumsticks and fresh peas
and cherry tomatoes in plastic bag.  Frozen juice will keep
other foods chilled and by lunchtime will be a "fruit
slush" dessert.
Variation:  Instead of potato chips, use crushed salt-free
tortilla chips and substitute chili powder for curry.
PUNK PIZZA ROLLSServes 8
Tell your kids as they're eating this, "If you grew as fast
as a chicken, you would have weighed 349 pounds by the time
you were 2 months old!"
8 chicken franks
1 cup tomato sauce or pizza sauce
2 tablespoons finely chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
8 flour tortillas
1 1/2 cups shredded Mozzarella cheese
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Pierce each frank in several places
with a fork.  In a small bowl combine tomato sauce, onion,
and oregano; spread equal amounts over each tortilla.
Place one frank in center of each tortilla and roll up.
Place rolls about one-inch apart in shallow baking dish and
sprinkle each with equal amount of cheese.  Bake for about
20 minutes or until cheese melts and bubbles.
RAMAKI WRAPSMakes 64, Serves 16-18
This is a good appetizer for a teenage party.  I've served
it to kids who would never go for the chicken livers in the
original ramaki recipe. They've loved this version, made
with cut up franks.
8 chicken franks
1 can (8-ounces) water chestnuts, drained
32 strips bacon
Preheat oven to 400oF.  Cut each frank into 8 slices.
Slice water chestnuts thinly.  Halve bacon slices
crosswise.
For each ramaki, wrap frank slice and water chestnut slice
with bacon; secure with toothpick.  Place ramakis on a rack
over large baking pan and bake for 15 minutes or until
bacon is crisp.
RED EYE EGGROLLSMakes 16, Serves 8
These take some work, but they've been a great success with
both kids and adults.  I've served them at parties where
both have been present and the "egg rolls" vanished just
about as fast as I could make them.
8 chicken franks
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 can (16-ounces) bean sprouts, drained
2 cups shredded Chinese cabbage or iceberg lettuce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/4 cup chicken broth
16 square eggroll wrappers (You might be able to find them
in the produce section of your supermarket and they are
available in Oriental food shops.)
1 egg, beaten
vegetable oil for deep frying
Halve franks crosswise, set aside.  In large skillet, over
medium-high heat, heat oil; add vegetables, toss and cook 2
minutes.  Add soy sauce and broth.  Reduce heat to medium-
low and simmer, covered, 5 minutes; drain well in colander.
Place eggroll wrapper on work surface with a corner
pointing toward you; brush each corner with egg.  Place two
rounded tablespoons of vegetable mixture in center, then
top with frank piece horizontally.  Fold bottom corner over
frank and filling, then fold right and left corners over
and roll up to complete.
In a wok, fryer or heavy skillet, heat 2-inches oil to
370oF or until a small cube of bread sizzles when placed in
oil.  Fry 3-4 eggrolls at a time until crisp all over.
Drain well on paper towels.
Before serving , re-heat on shallow baking pan in preheated
350oF oven for 10 to 12 minutes.  (I don't recommend
reheating them in the microwave.  They'll come out soggy
instead of crisp.)
SPICED CREAMED CONE CHICKENServes 4
This is my first choice for when our twelve grandchildren
are coming.  The ice cream cone flavor is so subtle that no
one has yet been able to identify it without being told.
Still, the flavor is delicious.
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
8 ice cream cones, crushed (I use the sugar cones)
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
2 tablespoons shortening
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a shallow bowl combine sour
cream, salt, pepper, onion and allspice.  Place cone crumbs
on a sheet of wax paper. Dip chicken in sour cream mixture;
then in cone crumbs.  Melt shortening in shallow baking
pan; place chicken in single layer, skin side up, in pan.
Bake, uncovered, for about
1 hour or until cooked through.
SPICY SOUTHWESTERN CASSEROLEServes 6-8
Is there a teenage cook in the family?  He or she could
make this for the family dinner one night this week.
8 chicken franks
2  cans (15-ounces) chili
1 cup yellow cornmeal
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
2 eggs
2/3 cup melted butter or margarine
1 cup sour cream
1 can (16 ounces) niblets-style corn, drained
1/4 pound grated Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese
1 can (4 ounces) chopped, mild green chilies, drained
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Cut franks in half lengthwise.
Place chili in bottom of a buttered 7x14x2-inch baking
dish.  Arrange franks, cut side down, on top of chili.  In
medium size mixing bowl, mix dry ingredients.  Add eggs,
butter, and sour cream and blend thoroughly.  Fold in corn.
Sprinkle half of the cheese and green chilies over the
layer of franks.  Top with half of the corn mixture.
Sprinkle with remaining cheese and chilies and finish with
a layer of corn mixture.  Smooth the top with a spatula.
Bake in the middle of oven for 35 to 40 minutes, or until
top is lightly browned and toothpick inserted in corn
layers comes out clean.
PHOTO:  School's open, and crunchy Tater-Chip Drumsticks,
fresh vegetables and frozen-juice "slush" earn high lunch
bag... - 5
SWEET AND SOUR CHICKENServes 4
This is one of the National Chicken Cooking Contest
winners, and it's easy enough for the beginning cook. The
original recipe called for adding a teaspoon of salt to the
sweet and sour mixture, but I found that the salt in the
salad dressing and the onion soup mix was enough. If your
kids like foods salty, they may want to sprinkle more on at
the end.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1 bottle (8-ounces) Russian salad dressing
1 envelope (1-3/8-ounces) dry onion soup mix
1 jar (10-ounces) apricot preserves
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Place chicken, skin side up, in
single layer in large shallow baking dish.  In a large
measuring cup combine remaining ingredients and pour over
chicken.  Bake, uncovered, for about 1 hour, or until
cooked through.
TACO DOGSServes 6-8
Our neighbors South of the Border might be surprised at
this version of their tacos, but it's quick and good.
8 chicken franks
8 taco shells
1 can (15-ounces) chili with beans
1 cup shredded Monterey Jack or cheddar erey Jack or
cheddar cheese
1 cup shredded lettuce
1/2 cup diced tomato
Preheat oven to 350F.  Split franks in half lengthwise and
grill or fry briefly.  Place franks in taco shells and top
each with 2 tablespoons chili and 1 tablespoon cheese.
Place tacos on baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, or
until chili is hot and cheese is melted.  Top with taco
sauce, lettuce, tomato and remaining cheese.  Serve
immediately.

TATER FRANKSServes 6-8
This is inexpensive and easy to like.
8 chicken franks
3 tablespoons melted butter or margarine, divided
1-1/2 tablespoons milk
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
ground pepper to taste
3 cups cooked riced potatoes or very firm prepared instant
mashed potatoes
2 egg yolks
2 egg whites, lightly beaten with 1 tablespoon water
2-1/2 cups cornflake crumbs
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Pierce franks all over with a fork.
Pour half of butter into a mixing bowl.  Add milk, salt and
pepper, then add riced potatoes and beaten egg yolks.  (If
using instant mashed potatoes, omit milk.)  Beat thoroughly
with wooden spoon until well blended; chill until firm
enough to handle.  Divide potato mixture into eight parts.
Using your hands, form an even layer of potato (about 1/2-
inch thick) around each frank.  If mixture is sticky, flour
hands lightly.  Roll first in cornflake crumbs, then in egg
white and water mixture, and again in crumbs.  Place tater
franks on buttered baking sheet so they are not touching,
and drizzle with remaining melted butter.  Bake in the
middle of the oven for 30 minutes or until crisp and golden
brown. Serve immediately.
TEAM SPIRIT HEROSServes 8
Your teenagers can make this one.  If they don't like
peppers or onions, it's fine to skip them.
8 chicken franks
8 hero rolls
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
2 green peppers, cut into thin strips
1-1/2 cups tomato sauce
1 tablespoon fresh, minced basil or 1 teaspoon dried
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
12 slices Provolone cheese, cut into half-inch strips
Pierce each frank in several places with a fork.  Cut rolls
lengthwise, leaving the two halves attached. In a large
skillet over medium-low heat, heat oil.  Add onions and
peppers and cook for 10 minutes stirring often.  Add sauce
and herbs; stir and simmer 5 minutes.  Preheat oven to
350oF.  Place one frank in each roll, spoon equal amounts
of sauce mixture over franks.  Close roll and wrap securely
in foil.
Heat for 20 minutes, turning packages after 10 minutes.








 CHAPTER FIVE: CHICKEN FOR BARBECUING:
 America's Love Affair with an
Old Flame is Heating Up!

PHOTO: We have four good barbecue photos that might go with
this chapter. They're paperclipped in section labeled page
223.

Are you about to barbecue something?  Then you're part
of an ancient tradition.  Barbecuing is actually man's
oldest form of cooking; the outdoors was man's first
kitchen and an open fire his first stove.  The earliest
cooking method was to lay food on smoldering embers or
impale it on sticks held over a fire or dying coals.


It wasn't until the 1950s, however, that backyard
barbecuing as we know it began to catch on. It may surprise
you, but auto mogul Henry Ford played a major role in
this$and it had nothing to do with his automobiles. Ford's
contribution to backyard barbecuing was the invention of
the charcoal briquet. In the late 1920s, it was Ford who
had the better idea of grinding charcoal, combining it with
a starch, and re-forming it into uniform pillow shaped
briquets. These charcoal briquets burned more consistently
and more evenly than randomly sized and shaped lumps of
charcoal.

People immediately began using charcoal briquets for
industrial purposes, but backyard grills weren't readily
available yet. In the 1950s, when
backyard grills became widely available, and outdoor
cooking really began to take off. The combination of
outdoor grills and the charcoal briquets made barbecuing so
easy and reliable, that today, according to a Barbecue
Industry Association survey, seven out of ten American
households own a barbecue grill, and we use them about 1.5
billion times a year total.

Frank and I also barbecue, but it took some learning
on my part. In spite of being someone who loves to cook,
before marrying Frank, I'd never barbecued. I'd never even
thought to buy an outdoor grill.

What I'd been missing!  Frank does own a barbecue, a
nice handsome one that can manage chickenburgers for our
combined eighteen children and grandchildren all at once.
I love it, because we can all be outdoors, playing volley
ball or watching the young ones, with their arsenal of
squirt guns, as they gang up on Frank$and the beauty of it
all is that no one has to miss a moment of the fun by
having to go into the kitchen to fuss with dinner.

If you've been barbecuing for years, skip ahead to the
recipes.  But if you're like me and still new at it, here
are some tips that can help you get uniformly good results.
The tips come from the Perdue food scientists and home
economists, from Cooperative Extension and from the
Barbecue Industry Association.

_Start with a clean grill.   Removing old ashes
assures good air circulation, and cleaning away any cooked-
on bits of food results in better flavor and quality.

_Be sure to wash everything after handling raw meat.
Don't use the same plate for the cooked meat that you used
for the uncooked meat unless you've washed it in between.

_Coat grate with vegetable cooking spray, or brush
with cooking oil to prevent food from sticking.

_If the basting sauce contains oil, however, do not
grease the grill; too much oil causes flare-ups.

_Prepare the fire a half hour or more before grilling.
For quick lighting, use a chimney starter with crumpled
newspaper in the bottom and briquets or charcoal above.  Or
stack the charcoal in a pyramid shape and light with a
liquid or electric starter, following the manufacturer's
directions. Charcoal is ready for cooking when it's 80%
ashy grey in daylight, glowing red at night.  This usually
takes about 25 to 30 minutes.

_Toss a handful of aromatic wood chips such as
mesquite, hickory, alder, or fruitwood chips over the
coals.  They'll create a whole new dimension of flavor
without adding any extra calories.

_Check the temperature of the fire before cooking food
to prevent over- or under-cooking.  For most of the recipes
in this chapter, the fire should be medium-hot with a
single, even layer of coals lightly covered with grey ash.
It's relatively simple to judge the temperature of a
charcoal fire.  To do this, hold your hand, palm side down,
at cooking height:

HOT - You can hold your hand over the coals for only 2
seconds.

MEDIUM-HOT - You can hold your hand over the coals 3
to 4 seconds.

MEDIUM - You can hold your hand over the coals 4 to 5
seconds.

_Be patient.  If the fire hasn't cooled down
adequately, do not be tempted to put your chicken on to
cook - unless you like "blackened bird" a lot more than I
do.

_If you're dieting and want to remove the chicken's
skin, do so after cooking, not before.  Without some kind
of covering, the chicken will dry out and toughen before it
finishes cooking.

_Turn chicken frequently, about every 5 minutes to
insure even doneness and to prevent blistering.

_If flare-ups occur, remove the food for a few moments
and sprinkle water lightly over the flames, or smother them
by covering the grill. A friend of mine who works for a
volunteer fire department keeps a laundry squirt bottle
handy for flare-ups.

_To increase the heat, you can push coals together,
add more coals or lower the grilling surface, or fan the
fire and tap the ashes from the coals.

_To decrease heat, raise the cooking grid or sprinkle
coals with a little water.

_Cook white-meat poultry until juices run clear and
the meat reaches an internal temperature of 170o to 175oF
and dark meat to 180o to 185oF on a meat thermometer.

_Grill smaller poultry parts and Cornish game hens
directly over a single layer of coals on an open grill or
hibachi.

_Grill whole birds and larger parts using the indirect
method in a covered grill.  Place a drip pan beneath the
bird; the pan should be slightly larger than the bird. Fill
the pan halfway with water, and surround it with a double
layer of coals to provide longer, slower, oven-like
cooking.  Add extra coals to the outer edge of the fire as
needed to extend grilling.

_To reduce the chance of overbrowning, apply tomato-
based sauces or those containing sugar or other sweeteners
only during last 20 to 30 minutes of grilling.

_To make breast quarters grill more quickly and
evenly, cut through the wing joint to break it and bring
the wing closer to the grill.

_Chicken should be well-done.  If you don't want to
take the usual time it takes, cook your chicken partially
in the microwave and then finish it on the grill.

_The basic guidelines for timing chicken on the grill
are:

        Parts$Cook dark meat 30 minutes, white meat 15
minutes, basting and turning every five or so minutes.

        Halves$First, grill skin side down for 5 minutes,
then cook       covered, skin side up, 35-40 minutes.

        Wings$10 minutes per side.

        Whole$(about 3 and 1/2 pounds...About 1 and 1/4
to 1 and 1/2 hours in a covered grill, 1 and 1/2 to 2 hours
on rotisserie.

_Use tongs rather than a fork to turn food gently
without losing juices.

_If you plan to use marinade as a sauce to be served
with chicken during the meal, be sure to cook it before
using.  You want to avoid the cross-contamination that can
come from contact with the uncooked chicken. Temperatures
over 140 degrees will destroy any microbes.
BEER-BE-CUED CHICKEN Serves 2-4
This is one of the National Chicken Cooking Contest
winners.  It's been adapted slightly, and this version has
the reputation of being particularly popular with men.
1 can (12-ounces) beer
1 tablespoon dark molasses
1 tablespoon onion juice
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 cup ketchup
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 chicken, cut in half lengthwise
In a shallow dish combine beer, molasses, onion juice,
lemon juice, ketchup and salt.  Add chicken, cover, and
marinate 3 hours or longer, refrigerated. Grill chicken 5
to 6 inches above medium-hot coals for 35 to 45 minutes or
until cooked through. Turn and baste with marinade every 10
to 15 minutes.
BONELESS BREASTS TANDOORIServes 4 to 6
In many eastern countries, yogurt is a favorite ingredient
for marinades used to flavor and tenderize meats.  One of
the most famous of these recipes is India's Tandoori
Chicken, which takes its name from the clay stove called a
tandor in which it is cooked.
8 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1 cup plain yogurt
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 large cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon turmeric
2 teaspoons ground coriander
salt and ground pepper to taste
lemon wedges for garnish
1/2 cup melted butter
In large bowl combine yogurt, butter, lemon juice and
spices.  Place chicken breasts in mixture and turn to coat
well.  Cover and marinate for 3 hours or longer,
refrigerated.  Remove chicken from marinade and grill 5 to
6 inches above medium-hot coals for 10 minutes  Turn and
baste 2 to 3 times with marinade.  Serve with lemon wedges.
BRANDY-ORANGE BARBECUED CORNISHServes 2-4
When choosing the brandy for this, I'd recommend a
California brandy in preference to an imported one.  The
California ones tend to be lighter and more fruity, which
makes them appropriate for this recipe.
2 fresh Cornish hens
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger, divided
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup orange marmalade
1 tablespoon brandy
With kitchen string, tie drumsticks together.  Rub hens
with oil and 1 tablespoon lemon juice; sprinkle with 1/4
teaspoon ginger, salt and pepper.
In small bowl, combine marmalade, brandy, remaining lemon
juice and ginger; set aside.  Place hens on grill breast
side up.  Grill, covered 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot
coals 50 to 60 minutes.  After 40 minutes, brush hens with
brandy-orange sauce.  Cook, basting 3 to 4 times, until
juices run clear with no hint of pink when thigh is
pierced.
CHICK KEBABSServes 6
These chick kebabs go wonderfully with rice.  As someone
who grows rice commercially, it hurts me to say this, but
for this recipe, I recommend a kind of rice I don't grow,
the long grain kind that cooks up fluffy with each grain
separate.  (I grow short or medium grain rice which is
always sticky, no matter how you cook it.)  6 boneless,
skinless chicken breast halves
1/4 pound small, fresh mushrooms
1 can (7-1/2-ounces) whole white onions
1 green pepper, cut in one-inch squares
Marinade:
1/4 cup oil
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 can (8-ounces) crushed pineapple
1 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon curry powder
3/4 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary or 1/4 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons salt or to taste
2 teaspoons ground pepper
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 cup water
Cut chicken breasts into 1-inch cubes.  Alternate chicken
on skewers with mushrooms, onions and green pepper, then
lay flat in shallow baking dish.  Combine marinade
ingredients except flour and water.  Pour marinade over
skewers.  Cover and store in refrigerator 3 to 4 hours or
overnight.  Baste kebabs with marinade and grill 4 to 5
inches above medium-hot coals for 6 to 8 minutes until
chicken is lightly browned and cooked through.  In a small
bowl dissolve cornstarch in water.  Place  remaining
marinade in a small saucepan.  Stir in cornstarch and
heat, stirring until sauce is slightly thickened.  Serve
sauce over kebabs and rice.
CHICKEN ALMONDINEServes 6-8
You can save money buying the sesame seeds for this recipe
in bulk, either from your supermarket or health food store.
The one drawback to buying them in bulk is that they have a
limited shelf life and at room temperature, they can
develop an off-taste due to rancidity. Keep bulk sesame
seeds refrigerated or frozen if you won't be using them in
a week or so.
8 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1-1/2 teaspoons salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon paprika
6 tablespoons sesame seeds
8 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
8 tablespoons sliced almonds
8 tablespoons dry vermouth
aluminum foil
Season chicken with salt and paprika; then roll in sesame
seeds. Place each chicken piece in center of piece of foil;
fold sides up to vertical position to hold liquids.  Place
1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon almonds and 1 tablespoon
vermouth on each chicken piece.  Close foil over chicken
and seal well.  Place packets on grill 5 to 6 inches above
hot coals. Cook about 20 minutes, turning 2 to 3 times
until chicken is cooked through.
CHICKEN TARRAGONServes 4
To make breast quarters grill more quickly and evenly,
remember to cut through the wing joint to break it and
bring the wing closer to the grill.
1 chicken, quartered
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/3 cup chopped fresh tarragon or 2 tablespoons dried
salt and ground pepper to taste
Working from the cut  side of breast and thigh quarters,
carefully use fingers to separate skin from flesh and form
a "pocket."  In large bowl, combine lime juice and
remaining ingredients.  Place chicken in marinade and spoon
some marinade between skin and flesh.  Cover and
refrigerate 1 hour or longer.
Drain chicken, reserving marinade.  Grill chicken,
uncovered, 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot coals 35-45
minutes or until cooked through, turning and basting
frequently with marinade.
CHUTNEY BURGERSServes 4-6
Try this "Yogurt Sauce" along with the Chutney Burgers. In
a small bowl combine 1/2 cup yogurt, 2 tablespoons chopped
scallions, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 1/2 teaspoon sugar, 1/4
teaspoon salt and a dash of Cayenne pepper.

1 package fresh ground chicken (about 1 pound)
2 tablespoons chutney
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup chopped scallion
1 teaspoon salt
6 individual pita pockets

In a mixing bowl, combine chicken and remaining seasonings.
Form into 4 to 6 burgers.  Grill on lightly oiled surface,
5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals, 5 to 6 minutes per
side, or until burgers are cooked through.  Serve in
lightly toasted pita pockets topped with "Yogurt Sauce".

CONFETTI BURGERSServes 4-6
A neat accompaniment for Confetti Burgers is halved Kaiser
rolls, brushed with olive oil flavored with garlic.  Place
on outer edges of grill a few minutes until lightly
toasted.
1 package fresh ground chicken (about 1 pound)
1/4 cup oat bran or bread crumbs
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1/4 cup diced tomato
1/4 cup finely chopped carrot
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
1/4 cup finely chopped green pepper
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
6 Kaiser rolls

In a mixing bowl combine chicken with vegetables and
seasonings.  Form into 6 burgers.  Grill on lightly oiled
surface 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot coals for 4 to 6
minutes per side or until burgers are cooked through.
Serve on toasted Kaiser rolls.


CHINESE GRILLED DRUMSTICKSServes 2-4
Hoisin sauce is available in Chinese groceries.  It's
slightly sweet, and thick, somewhat like ketchup.
5 roaster drumsticks
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup hoisin sauce
2 tablespoons dry sherry
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 clove garlic, minced
Season chicken to taste with salt and pepper.  In a shallow
bowl combine remaining ingredients.  Roll drumsticks in
sauce, reserving excess.  Wrap drumsticks individually in
aluminum foil, adding a spoonful of sauce to each package.
Grill 6 to 8-inches from hot coals, or bake 1 hour at
375oF, turning once.  Unwrap drumsticks and place on grill,
or broiling pan.  Pour drippings from foil packages and
remaining sauce into a small saucepan and heat.  Grill or
broil drumsticks turning and basting frequently with sauce
for 15 minutes or until cooked through.
FIRE EATERS' CHICKENServes 4
This recipe gets its name from the rather large quantity of
red pepper. If children and other non-fire eaters will be
eating this, you will probably want to decrease the amount
of red pepper substantially.
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 to 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper or to taste
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
Lemon wedges (optional)
In shallow dish, combine lemon juice, olive oil, garlic,
paprika, pepper and salt. Add chicken to marinade, turning
to coat both sides.  Cover and refrigerate 1 hour or
longer.
Drain chicken, reserving marinade.  Grill chicken breasts,
uncovered, 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot coals 6 to 8
minutes on each side until cooked through, basting
occasionally with marinade.  To serve, garnish with lemon
wedges.
GAME HENS PESTOServes 4
Pesto is a sauce made with basil, parsley, garlic, olive
oil and Parmesan cheese.  If you're looking for a shortcut,
you might be able to find ready-made Pesto in your
supermarket.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1/4 cup olive or salad oil
1/4 cup minced fresh basil or 1 tablespoon dried basil
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1 small clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 can (8-ounces) minced clams, drained
2 tablespoons dry white wine (optional)
Halve hens lengthwise and remove backbones.  Place 1 half
on each of four 14-inch squares of heavy duty aluminum
foil.  Turn up edges of foil.
In bowl, blend oil, basil, parsley, cheese, garlic and
salt.  Add clams and wine.  Divide among packets, spooning
over hens.  Bring two opposite sides of foil together and
close packets securely using several folds and turning up
ends to seal.  Cook 4 to 6 inches above hot coals, 30 to 40
minutes, until cooked through, turning packets twice.
Packets may also be baked at 400oF for about 30 minutes.
GRILLED BREAST STEAK SALADServes 4
If you have leftovers, use them in a sandwich.
1 roaster boneless breast
3 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
1-1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon paprika
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
3/4 cup olive or vegetable oil
3 tablespoons minced red onion
3 cups spinach leaves, sliced into 1/2" strips
3 cups thinly sliced red cabbage
Flatten breast halves slightly between sheets of plastic
wrap.  Combine butter, Worcestershire sauce, paprika, salt
and pepper.  Brush sauce liberally over chicken.  Grill 5
to 6 inches above medium-hot coals for 8 to 10 minutes on
each side or until cooked through. Remove and slice thinly
on the diagonal.  Combine vinegar and mustard in a small
bowl.  Slowly whisk in oil.  Add red onion and season with
salt and pepper.  Place 2 cups spinach and 2 cups cabbage
in a salad bowl.  Arrange half of the chicken slices over
top and spoon half of the dressing over all.
GRILLED CORNISH WITH VEGETABLESServes 2
If you want to skip tying the legs together, as called for
in this recipe, the hens won't hold their shape as well and
will look more relaxed.  The advantage is that you may feel
more relaxed.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 medium carrot, cut into thin strips
1 small leek, cut into thin strips
1 rib celery, cut into thin strips
1/4 cup apple juice
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
Season hens inside and out with salt and pepper.  Tie legs
together and fold wings back.  Place each hen on an 18-inch
square of heavy duty aluminum foil.  Dot with butter.
Divide vegetables and apple juice among foil pieces.  Fold
edges up and seal tightly.  Place packets on grill 5 to 6
inches above hot coals. Cook 60 to 70 minutes, turning 2 to
3 times until hens are cooked through. Or bake at 400oF one
hour or until juices run clear with no hint of pink when
thigh is pierced.  Open foil packages carefully and
sprinkle with parsley.
GRILLED DRUMSTICKS WITH FRUIT MUSTARDServes 2-4
Do you remember in the early 1980s a fast food chain had a
popular advertising campaign based on the slogan, "Where's
the beef?" One of my favorite Perdue ads is a full page ad
showing Frank holding a drumstick with a big bite missing.
He's looking out at you, his eyebrows raised quizzically as
he asks, "Who cares where the beef is?"
This recipe could have been used to cook the drumstick
shown in the ad.
5 roaster drumsticks
salt and ground pepper to taste
8 ripe apricots, or 1 can (16-ounces) drained and coarsely
chopped
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
3 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1/4 cup brandy
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Season drumsticks with salt and pepper.  Toss apricots with
lemon; add remaining ingredients and toss.  Wrap drumsticks
individually with aluminum foil, adding a spoonful of sauce
to each package.  Grill 5 to 6 inches above hot coals or
bake at 375oF for 1 hour, turning once.  Unwrap drumsticks
and place on grill, or broiling pan.  Add drippings from
foil packages to remaining sauce.  Grill or broil
drumsticks turning and basting frequently with sauce for 15
minutes or until cooked through.
GRILLED CUTLETS COSTA DEL SOLServes 4
This is one of Perdue's most popular and most requested
recipes.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1/3 cup dry sherry
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon white vinegar
salt and ground pepper to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
Place cutlets between sheets of plastic wrap and pound to
1/2" thickness.  In a shallow dish combine remaining
ingredients. Add chicken and marinate for 1 hour or longer,
refrigerated.  Grill chicken 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot
coals for 15 to 20 minutes or until cooked through.  Turn
and baste with glaze 2 to 3 times.
GRILLED CUTLETS GREEK STYLE WITH OLIVE OILServes 4
Olive growers like to point out that the lowest mortality
rates due to cardiovascular disease are found on the Greek
island of Crete where olive oil consumption is highest.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
6 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/3 cup plain yogurt
1 teaspoon dried oregano
salt and ground pepper to taste
4 ripe tomatoes, cut into wedges (3 cups)
2 cucumbers, peeled, halved and cut into 1/2" slices (3/4
cup)
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley or mint
1/2 cup pitted ripe olives
Place cutlets between two sheets of plastic wrap and pound
to 1/4" thickness.  In a shallow dish whisk together
garlic, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil,
yogurt, oregano, salt and pepper.  Add cutlets and turn to
coat with marinade.  Cover and marinate for 3 hours or
longer, refrigerated.  Grill cutlets 4 to 6 inches above
medium-hot coals for 3 to 4 minutes on each side or until
cooked through.
In a large bowl, combine tomatoes, cucumbers, red onion,
black olives, remaining lemon juice, 4 tablespoons olive
oil and salt and pepper to taste.  Sprinkle with parsley or
mint before serving.  Cutlets may be served hot with salad
as a side dish or served cold sliced and added to salad.

GYPSY BURGERS                                           Serves 4-6
What I like best about chicken burgers, as opposed to
hamburgers, is that chicken burgers don't shrink much when
you cook them.
1 package fresh ground chicken
3/4 cup chopped scallion, divided
1/2 cup sour cream, divided
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
Pinch Cayenne pepper
8 to 12 slices Italian or French bread

In a mixing bowl, combine chicken, 1/3 cup scallions, 2
tablespoons sour cream, and remaining ingredients.  Form
into 4 to 6 burgers.  Grill on lightly oiled surface 5 to 6
inches above medium-hot coals, 5 to 6 minutes per side or
until cooked through.  Serve on toasted slices of Italian
or French bread, topped with sour cream and scallions.
PHOTO: Hawaiian glazed wings
HAWAIIAN GLAZED WINGSServes 2-4
The natural juiciness of chicken wings makes them a good
choice for barbecuing. This can make either a nice meal for
a few, or appetizers for several.
10 chicken wings
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt or to taste
Marmalade Pineapple Glaze:
1/4 cup orange marmalade
1/4 cup pineapple preserves
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
In a large bowl toss wings with vegetable oil, lemon juice
and seasoned salt.  In a small bowl combine glaze
ingredients.  Drain wings and grill 6 to 8 inches above
medium-hot coals for about 20 minutes or until golden brown
and cooked through.  Turn and baste 2 to 3 times with
glaze.
HERB BARBECUED BREASTSServes 4
Frank always removes the skin from chicken, and often, that
means losing some of the herbs and spices.  I like this
recipe because even if you remove the skin at the end of
the barbecuing, the flavoring is still there.
4 chicken breast halves
1/2 cup softened butter or margarine
2 tablespoons chopped scallions
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
1 and 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh rosemary, or 1/2 teaspoon
dried
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 small clove garlic, minced
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
Working from the wide "neck end" of breasts use finger tips
to carefully separate skin from meat to form a pocket.  In
a small saucepan combine remaining ingredients.  Place
about 2 tablespoons of butter mixture in pocket of each
breast.  Close skin flap at neck edge with a small skewer
or toothpick.  Melt remaining butter mixture and reserve
for basting.  Grill chicken 6 to 8 inches above medium-hot
coals for 25 to 30 minutes or until cooked through turning
and basting chicken every 8 to 10 minutes with butter.

HONEY MUSTARD GRILLED HENS              Serves 2
I've found that hens cook a little faster and are more
attractive when served if you remove the backbone before
cooking.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
salt and ground pepper to taste
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 tablespoons honey
1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
Halve hens and remove backbones.  (See page ___ for
directions on doing this.)  Season with salt and pepper.
In a small saucepan, melt butter; stir in remaining
ingredients.  Grill hens 6 to 8 inches above hot coals 20
to 30 minutes or until cooked through, turning often.
Baste with sauce during last 10 minutes of cooking time.

HOT AND SPICY PICK-OF-THE-CHICKServes 4-6
Are you familiar with the spice, "cumin", called for in
this recipe? It's the dried fruit or seed of a plant in the
parsley family.  It's sometimes substituted for caraway
seed and is a principal ingredient in both curry powder and
chili powder.
1 jar (5-ounces) roasted peppers, drained
1 can (4-ounces) mild green chilies, drained
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons lime juice
1-1/2 teaspoons Tabasco
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
2 to 3 sprigs fresh coriander (optional)
1 package chicken parts (about 3 pounds)
In food processor or blender, combine all ingredients
except chicken; puree until smooth.  Set aside 1/2 cup
sauce.
Grill chicken, uncovered, 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot
coals 40 to 50 minutes or until cooked through, turning and
basting with remaining sauce 3 to 4 times during grilling.
Serve reserved 1/2 cup sauce as a condiment with grilled
chicken.
Oriental Grill
"KUNG FU" CUTLETS                               Serves 4
When you see the sweet potatoes called for in this recipe,
you might wonder, "Is there's a difference between sweet
potatoes and yams?"  And if there is a difference, "Does it
matter?"  According to sweet potato grower Tom Archibald
from California, there is and it does.  "The sweet potato's
texture is close to an Irish potato's, while the yam's is
moister and less firm and doesn't hold up as well," he
says. "You can tell the difference between them because the
sweet potato is light-skinned, while the yam has a bronze-
colored or reddish skin."
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves or 1 package
thin sliced roaster     breast
2 sweet potatoes, scrubbed but not peeled
8 scallions, trimmed
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame or vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup tonkatsu sauce (recipe follows, or use bottled
version)
Place chicken breasts between sheets of plastic wrap and
pound to 1/2 inch thickness. Skip previous step if using
thin sliced roaster breast. Cut sweet potatoes into 1/2-
inch slices.  Place chicken and potatoes in a shallow bowl
with scallions, soy sauce, oil and pepper; toss well.
Grill cutlets and potato slices 6 to 8 inches above medium-
hot coals for 8 to 10 minutes per side or until cutlets are
cooked through and potato slices tender.  Grill scallions
10 minutes, turning once.  Serve grilled cutlets and
vegetables with tonkatsu sauce as condiment; add a favorite
cole slaw as side dish.
Tonkatsu Sauce:
In small bowl, combine 1/4 cup sweet and sour sauce, 1
tablespoon soy sauce, 2 teaspoon white vinegar, and 1
teaspoon Worcestershire sauce.
LEMON SPECIAL CHICKEN Serves 2-4
If you don't want to barbecue a half chicken, substitute
chicken parts.
See table on page 12 for amounts to equal a whole chicken.
1 chicken, cut in half lengthwise
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
1/2 teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
Grill chicken halves 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals
for 35 to 45 minutes or until cooked through.  In a small
saucepan combine remaining ingredients. Make sauce of
butter or margarine, paprika, sugar, lemon juice and
Worcestershire.  Turn and baste chicken with butter sauce 2
to 3 times.
MAHOGANY BARBECUED HENSServes 2
People often ask Frank if a Cornish game hen is a separate
breed from regular chickens.  The answer is mostly no and a
little bit yes.  Cornish game hens are young chickens,
usually around five weeks; if they were just a couple of
weeks older, they'd be sold for broilers, except for the
Perdue ones.  Perdue Cornish come from the Roaster breed
which Perdue geneticist Norman Lupean developed, and which
is only available through Perdue.  Unlike broilers,
roasters reach market size at twelve weeks. Both Perdue
Cornish and the Oven Stuffer Roasters were bred to have the
broadest, meatiest breasts in the industry.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1/4 cup mustard
1/4 cup grape jelly
2 tablespoons oil
Halve hens and remove backbones.  In a small bowl combine
remaining ingredients. Grill 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot
coals for 30 to 40 minutes until cooked through, turning  2
to 3 times. Baste with mustard mixture during last 15
minutes.
MEXICALI CHICKENServes 4-6
When you buy a chili powder for use in a Mexican dish like
this one, you can be pretty sure that as long as you stick
with the same brand, it will be about the same "heat" next
year as it was last year. Having this kind of quality
control is difficult because, first, there are more than
5000 known varieties of chilies, each with their own degree
of "heat" and second, the same variety grown in a different
climate or different year will vary considerably.  The
chili powder manufacturers get a consistent product by
adjusting the formulations each year.
1/3 cup fresh lime juice
1/3 cup white vinegar
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 whole roaster breast
2 tablespoons chopped, mild green chilies
1/4 cup ketchup
Tabasco
In large bowl, combine lime juice, vinegar, cumin, chili
powder, salt and pepper.  Place breast in marinade; cover
and refrigerate 1 hour or longer. When coals are hot,
arrange around drip pan filled halfway with water, close
all vents.  Drain breast, reserving marinade.  Place breast
skin side down on grill over drip pan.  Grill, covered, 50
to 55 minutes, turning occasionally.
Meanwhile, in small saucepan over medium-high heat, combine
reserved marinade, green chilies, ketchup and Tabasco to
taste; bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low; simmer until
slightly thickened.  Remove from heat and brush over
chicken during last 10 minutes of cooking time.  Serve
chicken with remaining sauce.
Grilled Fiesta Lunch
MEXICALI CUTLETSServes 4
You could just heat the cutlets in the microwave, but the
smoke from the barbecue will produce a particularly
delicious result.
1 package breaded chicken breast cutlets, ready to eat
4 slices Monterey Jack or mild cheddar cheese
8 flour tortillas
1 ripe tomato, sliced
1 ripe avocado, sliced
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup Mexican salsa
Grill cutlets 5 to 6-inches above hot coals 3 to 4 minutes
on each side or until crisp, browned and sizzling.  In last
3 to 4 minutes, place a slice of cheese on each cutlet to
melt.  While cutlets are grilling, sprinkle tortillas with
few drops of water and wrap in aluminum foil.  Warm
tortillas along edge of grill.
To serve, remove grilled cutlets to serving plates and top
with tomato and avocado slices; add dollops of sour cream
and salsa.  Pass warm tortillas.
MISSISSIPPI SMOKY BARBECUED DRUMSTICKSServes 2
Try serving these with drumsticks frills for a special
decorative touch. Fold heavy white paper (7-inches by 9-
inches) in half, lengthwise.  Fold in half lengthwise again
and tape long edges closed.  This produces a strip
measuring 9-inches by 1-3/4-inches.  Cut strip into two 4-
1/2-inch strips.  On each, slash 1-inch cuts at 1/4-inch
intervals along the entire length of the untaped folded
edge.  To "fluff" frills, press top of slashed edge.  Tape
frills in place around drumsticks just before serving.
5 roaster drumsticks
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1/4 cup finely chopped green pepper
1/2 cup ketchup
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1-1/2 teaspoons liquid smoke (optional)
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
8 to 12 drops Tabasco, or to taste
Season drumsticks with salt and pepper.  In a shallow dish
combine remaining ingredients.  Roll drumsticks in sauce,
reserving excess.  Wrap drumsticks individually in aluminum
foil, adding a spoonful of sauce to each package.  Grill 6
to 8-inches from hot coals, or bake at 375oF 1 hour,
turning once.  Unwrap drumsticks and place on grill, or
broiling pan.  Add drippings from foil packages to
remaining sauce.  Grill or broil drumsticks turning and
basting frequently with sauce for 15 minutes or until
cooked through.
NORTH CAROLINA GRILLED CHICKEN Serves 4-6
This was a National Chicken Cooking Contest winner.
2 chickens, cut in half lengthwise
1 cup butter or margarine (2 sticks), melted
2 envelopes (6-ounces each) Italian salad dressing mix
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
Place chicken in a shallow dish.  In a measuring cup
combine remaining ingredients and pour over chicken;  cover
and refrigerate.  Melt butter or margarine in saucepan.
Marinate  turning occasionally, for 3 to 4 hours or
overnight.  Grill chicken 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot
coals for 35 to 45 minutes or until cooked through.  Turn
and baste with marinade every 10 to 15 minutes.
PEPPERY GRILLED THIGH SALADServes 4
The arugula called for in this recipe is not essential and
you can substitute watercress or even iceberg lettuce if
you have to.  But if you can find it, it's a fresh
attractive taste. I used to grow arugula in my back yard
garden, using seeds a friend brought back for me from
Italy.
4 boneless roaster thigh cutlets
1 teaspoon coarsely ground or cracked black pepper
3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce, divided
1/2 cup olive oil or vegetable oil, divided
salt to taste
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons wine vinegar
1 tablespoon minced shallot or scallion
1 small head bibb or Boston lettuce, torn into pieces
1 bunch arugula, well rinsed, torn into pieces
1 head Belgian endive, torn into pieces
1/2 pound green beans, cooked tender-crisp
1 tablespoon minced fresh basil (optional)
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
Open cutlets and flatten slightly to even thickness; press
pepper into both sides of cutlets and place in a shallow
baking dish.  Add 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce; turn
chicken to coat well.  Cover and refrigerate 1 hour or
longer. Remove cutlets from marinade; brush with 1
tablespoon oil and sprinkle lightly with salt.  Grill
cutlets, uncovered, 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot coals 25
to 35 minutes or until chicken is cooked through, turning
occasionally.
In salad bowl, combine mustard, vinegar and shallot.
Gradually whisk in remaining oil.  Slice warm cutlets and
add any meat juices to dressing.  Arrange greens around
edges of 4 dinner plates.  Toss chicken and beans with
dressing and mound equal portions in middle of greens.  To
serve, drizzle salads with any remaining dressing and
sprinkle with minced herbs.
PRAIRIE BARBECUED CHICKEN Serves 2-4
Besides adding flavor, vinegar makes an excellent
tenderizing agent in this$or any$marinade.
1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1 bottle (15-ounces) ketchup
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup water
1 chicken, cut in half lengthwise
In a shallow dish combine butter, vinegar, ketchup, salt,
pepper and water.  Add chicken and turn to coat well; cover
and refrigerate.  Marinate chicken several hours or
overnight.  Grill 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals for
35 to 45 minutes or until cooked through.  Baste with
marinade and turn 3 to 4 times.

PHOTO: "Spring "B" list, 1985, Father's Day Barbecue
PROVENCAL HERB DRUMSTICKSServes 2-3
The flavorful combination called "herbes de Provence",
consisting of basil, thyme, oregano, and other herbs, is
typically used in marinades in the south of France, where
grilling is often done over cuttings from grape vines.
6 chicken drumsticks
1/2 cup red wine
1/3 cup water
1 tablespoon wine vinegar
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh basil or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1-1/2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1-1/2 teaspoons minced fresh oregano or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 teaspoons anchovy paste (optional)
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
With fork, pierce drumsticks to help seasonings to
penetrate.  In large bowl, combine remaining ingredients
except oil; whisk in oil.  Add chicken to marinade; cover
and refrigerate 1 hour or longer.  Grill drumsticks,
uncovered, 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot coals 35 to 45
minutes or until cooked through, turning and basting
frequently with marinade.
RUSSIAN GRILLED CORNISHServes 2-3
For a traditional Russian Cornish, use a heavy iron skillet
to weight hens while grilling.  Called tabaka-style in
Russia, pressed chicken is popular because it browns
quickly and holds its shape well.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
6 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Kosher salt and pepper to taste
lemon wedges (optional)
With poultry shears or sharp knife, cut along both sides of
backbone and remove.  On flat surface, spread out hens skin
side up and press down on breast bones to flatten.
In a dish combine lemon juice and garlic.  Add hens to
marinade, turning to coat well.  Cover and refrigerate 1
hour or longer.
Remove hens from marinade, rub lightly with oil and
sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Place hens on grill, skin
side up, and top with a heavy iron skillet or other pan
filled with 1 pound heat-proof object, to flatten.  Grill,
5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals.  After 15 minutes
turn hens and replace weight.  Continue grilling for
another 15 to 20 minutes or until hens are well browned and
cooked through.  To serve, garnish hens with lemon wedges.
SANTA FE CHICKEN HEROServes 4-5
Thin-sliced roaster breast couldn't be easier or faster to
grill for this hearty update of the submarine/hoagy/hero
sandwich.  This is a complete Tex-Mex meal in one.
1 roaster thin-sliced boneless breast (1 1/4 pounds) or 4
skinless, boneless, chicken breast halves butterflied
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Salt and ground pepper to taste
Cayenne
Chili powder
5 to 6 thin slices Monterey Jack cheese with chilies
5 to 6 slices French or Italian bread
2 tablespoons melted butter or margarine
5 to 6 leaves Romaine lettuce
1 tomato, thinly sliced
1 avocado, peeled, pitted, sliced and tossed with lemon
juice
1/2 cup prepared salsa
Rub chicken lightly with oil and season with salt, pepper,
Cayenne and chili powder.  Grill, 5 to 6-inches above
medium-hot coals about 2 minutes on each side.  Top chicken
with slices of cheese;  grill 1 to 2 minutes longer or
until cheese is melted.
Brush bread with melted butter; grill alongside chicken 1
to 2 minutes on each side until golden brown.  To serve,
place a lettuce leaf on each toasted bread slice.  Evenly
divide chicken, slices of tomato and avocado on top.  Serve
sandwiches open-faced with salsa.
SEASONED BARBECUED CHICKENServes 2-4
This recipe calls for Sauterne wine, which is a fairly
sweet wine.  You can use another white wine if you can't
find Sauterne; the results will still be good, just
different.
1 chicken, cut in half lengthwise
1 cup Sauterne wine
1/2 cup oil
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon onion juice
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
Place chicken in a shallow dish and add remaining
ingredients.  Turn chicken to coat with marinade.  Cover
and refrigerate for 3 hours or longer.  Grill chicken 5 to
6 inches above medium-hot coals for 35 to 45 minutes or
until cooked through.  Turn and baste with marinade 3 to 4
times.
SOY AND SESAME THIGH KEBABSServes 4
 Thigh meat is a good choice for barbecuing because it's
naturally juicy and doesn't easily dry out or toughen. If
you want to grill some vegetables at the same time, reserve
some of the marinade and baste the vegetables with it. Try
serving the kebabs over rice.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1 teaspoon minced, fresh ginger or 1/2 teaspoon dried
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons sesame seeds
1/3 cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon white vinegar
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
Tabasco, to taste
Flatten cutlets slightly with a meat pounder.  Cut each
thigh into 6 or 8 pieces.  In a shallow dish, combine
remaining ingredients.  Add thigh pieces and toss to coat
well.  Cover and marinate one hour or longer, refrigerated.
Thread chicken onto skewers; reserve marinade.  Grill
kebabs 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals for 20 to 30
minutes until cooked through  Turn and baste often with
marinade.
SWEET AND SOUR ROASTER BREASTSServes 3-4
Boneless roaster breasts grill quickly and make an
impressive dish for guests.  Because they are skinless,
they absorb marinades well, but should be turned and basted
often to keep the meat moist. Without basting, they can
quickly get dry and tough.
1 roaster boneless breast
1/2 cup diced onion
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
In a shallow dish, combine onions, soy sauce, oil and
ginger.  Place chicken in marinade; cover and refrigerate 1
hour or longer, turning occasionally.
Drain chicken, reserving marinade.  Grill breasts 5 to 6-
inches above medium-hot coals 10 to 12 minutes on each side
or until cooked through.
Meanwhile, in small saucepan over medium heat, combine
marinade with sugar and cornstarch; bring to a boil.
Reduce heat to low; simmer 5 to 6 minutes or until
thickened.  Baste chicken generously with sauce during last
10 minutes of cooking time.  To serve, spoon remaining
sauce over chicken.
SWEET AND SOUR DRUMSTICKS
Chicken drumsticks are wonderfully tasty to eat by hand at
all outdoor functions.  And as a matter of fact, if you've
ever wondered about the etiquette of eating chicken with
your fingers, Frank says, "When in doubt, do!"
3/4 cup apricot preserves
3/4 cup chili sauce
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons grated onion
1 tablespoon fresh grated orange rind
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
12 chicken drumsticks
In a large measuring cup combine all ingredients except for
chicken. Reserve half of sauce to serve with cooked
chicken.  Brush remaining sauce over legs and grill 5 to 6
inches above medium-hot coals for 25 to 30 minutes until
cooked through. Turn and baste with sauce 2 to 3 times.
Transfer to serving dish and serve with remaining sauce.
SYRIAN GRILLED BREASTServes 4
I like pistachios in recipes because they are relatively
low in saturated fats and they're also lower in calories
than most other nuts.  Weight Watchers International
endorses pistachios for just this reason.
1 roaster boneless breast or 1 roaster thin-sliced boneless
breast
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh mint or 1 teaspoon dried
1 small clove garlic, minced
salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup chopped pistachios
Cut breast pieces in half, removing tenderloin pieces.
Place pieces, including tenderloin pieces, between sheets
of plastic wrap and pound to 1/4" thickness to form
cutlets. Or use the already sliced roaster breast and skip
the cutting and pounding. In a shallow dish combine lemon
juice, olive oil, mint, garlic, salt and pepper.  Add
chicken to marinade.  Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour or
longer, turning occasionally.  Grill cutlets 4 to 5 inches
above medium-hot coals for 2 to 3 minutes per side until
cooked through, brushing often with the marinade.  Sprinkle
with pistachios before serving.
SZECHUAN WINGSServes 4
When you buy wings for these recipes, if they come from
Perdue, the odds are that they won't have any tiny hairs on
them. That's actually a considerable engineering feat.  In
theory the singeing machines at the processing plants
should burn the little hairs off, but in practice, the
birds are wet by the time they get to the singeing machines
and the hairs can be stuck down so the flame doesn't reach
them.  Seeing this, Frank told the engineers at the
processing plant, "You know when you wash your hands in the
men's room and they have those hot air driers?  Design one
that's got an engine like a 747 and we'll hit the wing with
that and dry the hairs so they'll stand up."  The idea
worked, but not completely.  After the initial effort, the
machines still missed one or two hairs. For research into
the solution to this minor detail, the company has spent
more than $100,000 over the years.
24 chicken wings
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons chili sauce
3 tablespoons white vinegar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon crushed red pepper (less if you don't like it
hot)
salt to taste
Fold wing tips behind tip of large joints to form
triangles.  In large bowl, combine soy sauce and remaining
ingredients.  Place wings in marinade; cover and
refrigerate 1 hour or longer.
  Grill wingettes, 5 to 6-inches above medium-hot coals 15
to 20 minutes or until cooked through.  Turn and baste
frequently with marinade.
TEXAS TWISTER BARBECUED CUTLETSServes 4
There are a number of tips for keeping brown sugar soft. My
stepdaughter, Sandy Spedden, recommends adding a slice of
fresh apple to the box once you've opened it. Close the box
with the apple slice inside, and put in a sealed plastic
bag.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
salt and Cayenne pepper to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/2 cup ketchup
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon Tabasco, to taste
Flatten cutlets slightly with a meat pounder.  Rub lightly
with vegetable oil and sprinkle with salt and Cayenne
pepper.  In a small mixing bowl, combine garlic, cumin,
brown sugar, ketchup, vinegar and Tabasco.  Grill cutlets 4
to 5 inches above medium-hot coals for 15 to 20 minutes
until cooked through.  Turn and baste 2 to 3 times with
sauce.
NOTE TO PERSON WHO LAYS OUT THE BOOK: CAN WE HAVE THE
MARINADES AND BASTING SAUCES ON A SEPARATE PAGE, PROBABLY
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE CHAPTER?
MARINADES AND BASTES
Basting has no tenderizing qualities, but it does add a
special flavor to poultry.  Marinating for half an hour or
more will enhance both flavor and tenderness.
BEER MARINADEMakes about 2 cups
3 tablespoons spicy brown mustard
3 tablespoons brown sugar
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Tabasco
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper.
1 can (12-ounces) beer
1 extra large onion, peeled and sliced into rings
In large, shallow baking dish, combine first 7 ingredients;
stir in beer.  Add onion and 4 to 6 pounds chicken to
marinade.  Cover and refrigerate 1 hour or longer, turning
occasionally.  To grill, drain poultry and use marinade for
basting.  Onion rings may be grilled 2 to 3 minutes per
side and served with poultry.
CHUTNEY BARBECUE SAUCEMakes about 1-1/2 cups
You'll get a deeply browned chicken with this recipe.
1 jar (8-1/2-ounces) mango chutney
1/3 cup wine vinegar
1 tablespoon spicy brown mustard
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
In small bowl, combine all ingredients.  Use as basting
sauce for grilling 4 to 5 pounds of chicken during last 10
to 15 minutes cooking.  Lightly oil poultry before cooking,
and turn often to avoid burning.
FIREHOUSE BARBECUE SAUCEMakes about 3 cups
This barbecue recipe was developed by Robert Baker of
Cornell University in 1946, then published by New York's
state Extension Service with directions for quantity
grilling.  Dr. Baker's updated version of the recipe is
somewhat lower in salt.  You can refrigerate the extra
sauce for several weeks.
1 egg
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt or to taste
1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
In blender or medium-sized bowl, blend or beat egg.  Add
oil and beat again.  Stir in remaining ingredients.  Use as
a basting sauce for grilling 8 to 10 pounds of chicken,
basting frequently.  For milder, less salty flavor, baste
less often.
ORIENTAL MARINADEMakes about 1 cup
If you're using this marinade for kabobs, avoid a sticky
cleanup by using disposable wooden skewers; to prevent
burning, soak skewers in water for 30 minutes before use.
3/4 cup pineapple juice
1/4 cup soy sauce
3 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional)
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
In wide, shallow bowl, combine all ingredients.  Add 3 to 4
pounds chicken  to marinade; cover and refrigerate 1 hour
or longer, turning occasionally.  To grill, drain poultry
and use marinade for basting.
TRADITIONAL BARBECUE SAUCEMakes 1-1/2 cups
Barbecue sauces differ from marinades in how they are used.
A marinade is used to flavor meat before cooking and for
basting during grilling.  Barbecue sauces are used for
basting during cooking and are frequently re-cooked and
later served as a sauce at the table.
1 cup chili sauce
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon spicy brown mustard
1-1/2 teaspoons minced fresh oregano, or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1 to 1-1/2 teaspoons liquid smoke (optional, but I
recommend it, if you can        find it.)
In small bowl, combine all ingredients.  Use as basting
sauce for grilling 4 to 5 pounds chicken during last 10 to
15 minutes of cooking.  Turn poultry often to avoid
scorching.
WINE AND GARLIC MARINADEMakes about 1-1/4 cups
1 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup olive oil
6 to 8 garlic cloves, minced
3 lemon slices
1 tablespoon minced, fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried
1 tablespoon minced, fresh basil, or 1 teaspoon dried
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 bay leaf (optional)
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
In wide, shallow bowl, combine all ingredients.  Add 3 to 4
pounds chicken to marinade; cover and refrigerate 1 hour or
longer, turning occasionally.  Grill poultry and use
marinade for basting.





CHAPTER SIX CHICKEN FOR CROWDS


Do you have a wedding coming up?  A school reunion?
Or you just want to have the crowd over?  Well guess what!
I recommend chicken for the menu!  Seriously, it's a good
choice because it's on almost everyone's diet, most people
like it, and it's probably the most economical main course
that can be served to crowds.

Frank and I both enjoy entertaining.  There are many
months in the year when we entertain 50 associates (that's
the term used at Perdue Farms for employees) each week, and
at Christmas time, it has gotten up to 300 in a week.

People who know that Frank and I entertain a lot
sometimes ask why I don't have the parties catered.  The
fact is, I don't want to hire somebody to do what I enjoy
doing anyway.

Besides, it wouldn't fit in with our lifestyle to have
catered affairs.  Frank is actually a frugal and down-to-
earth man. He travels economy class, is careful to turn the
lights off when we leave the house, and before we married,
he cooked for himself and washed his own dishes.  (Now I do
it.) It's a real compliment when Frank says that someone is
"tight as the bark on an oak tree."

Still, I know we're all busy, so I'm in favor of any
shortcuts that help save time even if they cost a little
extra. And yet, as a former New England Yankee, I am always
in favor of spending money carefully. Here are some of the
tips that I've learned that may help you, whether you're
cooking for eight or a hundred:

_Plan a simple menu with everything done in advance,
except simple heating or reheating.  Most cookbooks suggest
that you have only a few dishes that require last minute
work, but I don't want the hassle of worrying about any;
I've found that last minute things always come up, and it's
wonderful to know that they're not going to upset your
schedule or leave you in a state of frazzlement.  In my own
case, I'm always working harder the day before the party
than the day of the party.

_Check that you've got refrigerator or freezer space
for all perishables.

_Check that you have the pots and pans and storage
containers for the foods you'll be preparing.

_Write a detailed schedule for yourself including the
menu and shopping list.  I like to have a copy of the menu
visible on my refrigerator, partly because it gives me
confidence as I check off each dish as it's completed, but
mostly because I remember one party when I forgot a dish
that I had cooked and was faced with leftover string beans
for thirty.

_This tip has nothing to do with poultry, but it's
worked so well for me I'll share it anyway. When the
occasion is special enough so that you're using a florist,
(a wedding? an anniversary?) your flower budget will go
further if you'll  call the florist a week ahead and tell
him or her your color scheme and what you're willing to
spend. The florist will know which flowers are in over
supply and therefore a bargain, and given a week, he or she
will have the time to place an order with the wholesaler
for the ones which are a good buy. You won't necessarily
spend less, but you're likely to get considerably more for
your money.

_Keep food safety in mind as you work.  Keep
perishable food, such as chicken, in the refrigerator
except when you're working with it.  Prepare food in
batches and have out only what you're using. When
refrigerating foods, have them in small enough batches so
that they'll cool quickly.

_If you're serving wine, make it white wine rather
than red wine. I say that not because white wine is
supposed to go with chicken (some of the more robust
recipes for chicken go beautifully with red wine), but
because white wine is less of a menace to your carpets.

_If it's a buffet and people will be balancing plates
on their laps, serve foods that are already bite-sized and
that don't require cutting with a knife and fork.

_Just because you're not having it catered doesn't
mean you have to do it all yourself.  If you're near a
college campus, see if the food service people at the
student cafeteria would be willing to make the vegetables
or other side dishes.  Also, check the cafeteria at a local
factory or processing plant. Sometimes these people will
moonlight and make large batches of your favorite recipe
for you.  They've got the equipment, and in my experience,
they're pleased to have the extra income.  Also, they're
frequently less expensive than restaurants and they're apt
to be much, much less expensive than a caterer.

_A crowd seldom consumes more than 3-ounces of cooked
protein total, per person, and that includes whatever
protein is part of the appetizers as well as the main
course.  However, I usually have closer to 4-ounces per
person available, just for "sociable security." If you plan
on just under 4-ounces each, you'll almost certainly have
leftovers, but at least you won't run out.  Another way of
calculating is that a breast and a wing per person will
insure that you'll have more than enough. (Adjust this
depending on whether you're entertaining toddlers or
professional football players or$the biggest eaters$older
teenage boys.) Also, keep in mind how much else you're
serving.  At our parties, I've seen that I'll always have
some leftovers if I allow a half cup serving per person for
each of the following: starches, vegetables, and salad,
plus a serving and a quarter of bread.  That's assuming
that there have been a couple of small appetizers before,
and that the main course will be followed by dessert.

_When you're multiplying recipes, keep in mind that
cooking times may be different if you change the recipe
size. A larger amount of food may take longer to cook; a
smaller amount may be overcooked in the same time.
ILLUSTRATION: ORIENTAL MINI DRUMSTICKS FROM CHICKEN WINGS
CURRIED CHICKEN FROM BONELESS BREAST
SANTA FE CHICKEN OR BONELESS THIGHS
PHOTO OF ALL THREE IN FILES
PHOTO:  Chicken "nibbles" just right for... - 6
DIPS AND SPREADS - 5
CHICKEN "NIBBLES" TAKE THE HEAT OUT OF SUMMER ENTERTAINING
Summer parties come in all shapes and sizes.  Some are
small and happen on the spur of the moment.  Others are
great boisterous affairs that roll across the lawn or down
the beach.  They're fun.  They're happy.  They also can be
lots of work, but one of the nicest shortcuts I know is the
pre-cooked nuggets, tenders, or wings.  Straight from the
package or warmed for serving, they're extra tasty dunked
into a quick dip.  I sometimes have an assortment of store-
bought mustards available, each in a pretty dish.  Or, when
there's more time, I'd use one of these Perdue recipes for
dips.
COOL AND CREAMY AVOCADO DIPMakes about 1-1/

Home economist Pat Cobe developed many of the dips for
Perdue.  I asked her how she got her ideas, and learned
that when composing a recipe she starts out by imagining
all the dips she's sampled at restaurants or food
conventions or parties, or ones she's read about in
magazines and cookbooks. Then in her imagination, she puts
together the best ideas from all of them.  As she sorts
these ideas around in her mind, she'll come up with
something new, and then she'll test it. Of all the ones she
thinks of, the only ones that she would consider actually
recommending to Perdue, would have to meet her criteria of
being "real food for real people."  Like this one.
4 cups
1 ripe avocado, peeled and seed removed
1/4 cup chopped scallions
1 tablespoon lime or lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 cup sour cream
In small bowl with fork, mash avocado.  Add green
scallions, lime juice and salt; blend well.  Stir in sour
cream.  Serve immediately or refrigerate until ready to
serve.
CREOLE DIPMakes about 1 cup
2/3 cup bottled chili sauce
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish (optional)
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
1 tablespoon minced scallion
1 tablespoon minced celery
In small bowl, combine all ingredients.  If time allows,
let stand at room temperature 1 hour for flavors to blend.
GARLICKY SWEET-SOUR DIPMakes 3/4 cup
2/3 cup packed brown sugar
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
In small saucepan, combine brown sugar, broth, soy sauce
and garlic; mix well.  In cup, blend vinegar and cornstarch
until smooth; stir into saucepan and place over medium
heat.  Bring to a boil; cook 3 to 5 minutes until mixture
thickens and becomes slightly reduced, stirring frequently.
Serve warm or at room temperature.
MEXICALI CHEESE DIPMakes about 2 cups
1 can (11-ounces) condensed Cheddar cheese soup
1 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese with Jalapeno peppers
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup chopped pimentos or tomatoes
Tabasco (optional)
In small saucepan, combine undiluted soup, shredded cheese
and cumin.  Place over low heat and cook until cheese is
completely melted, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat;
stir in sour cream, pimentos and hot pepper sauce to taste,
if desired.  To serve, keep warm in fondue pot, chafing
dish or heatproof bowl set on warming tray.
RED PEPPER DIPMakes about 1-1/3 cups
1 jar (7-ounces) roasted red peppers, drained
1 clove garlic, quartered
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 cup plain lowfat yogurt
In blender or food processor, puree red peppers, garlic and
cumin.  Add yogurt; blend or process a few seconds just
until mixed.  Chill several hours or overnight to blend
flavors.
SPICY CRANBERRY - ORANGE DIPMakes about 1 cup
1 cup prepared cranberry sauce
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1 tablespoon port or Marsala wine (optional)
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
3/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
In blender or food processor, puree all ingredients.  If
time allows, let stand at room temperature 1 hour for
flavors to blend.
APPETIZERS - 14
CHICKEN COCKTAIL PUFFS Makes 36 puffs
The cocktail puff is great when stuffed with chicken.  I
sometimes keep these puffs, unfilled, in the freezer to
have available when I need something on short notice.  You
don't need to thaw them before stuffing.
Cocktail Puffs
1/4 cup water
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup flour
1 egg, unbeaten
1/4 cup grated Swiss cheese
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a saucepan over medium heat,
heat butter in water until melted.  Add salt and flour all
at once and stir vigorously until ball forms in center of
pan.  Remove from heat and let stand 5 minutes.  Add egg
and beat until smooth, add cheese.  Mixture should be very
stiff. Drop by teaspoonful on baking sheet and bake for
about 40 minutes or until surface is free from beads of
moisture.  Turn off oven and prop door open slightly by
putting a pot holder in the crack.  Allow puffs to cool in
oven.  Slice crosswise for stuffing.
Filling
2 cups cooked chicken, minced
1/4 cup minced celery
3 tablespoons minced canned pimento
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon or basil
1/4 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
In a mixing bowl combine chicken, celery, pimento, lemon
juice, onion and tarragon lightly with mayonnaise.  Season
with salt and pepper.  Fill each puff with about 2
teaspoons of filling.
CHICKEN FRANK CARAWAY & KRAUT ROLL-UPSMakes about 64
You can reheat the "Roll-Ups" by toasting briefly under the
broiler after slicing.
2 tubes (10-ounces each) refrigerated white dinner loaf
2 tablespoons German-style mustard
1 can (7-ounces) sauerkraut, drained
1 egg, beaten, for glaze
8 chicken franks
4 tablespoons caraway seeds
Preheat oven to 350F.  Meanwhile, gently unroll loaf into
a 12-inch square, pinching slashed portions together to
seal.  With sharp knife, cut dough into quarters.  Spread
each piece of dough with mustard and a thin layer of
sauerkraut to within 1/2 inch of edge.  Brush edge lightly
with egg.  Place a frank on left side of 1 piece of dough
and roll up tightly.  Place roll, seam side down, on a
greased baking sheet.  Repeat with remaining franks and
dough.  Brush rolls with egg and sprinkle with caraway
seeds.
Bake for 15 minutes until golden brown.  Remove rolls to a
cutting board and allow to cool several minutes.  With
serrated knife, slice each roll into 8 small "roll-ups."
Serve immediately.
CHICKEN LIVER LOVERLIESMakes 50 puffs
It's not quite a cookie.  It's not quite a puff.  It's not
quite a fritter.  It's just something very special.
12 chicken livers (about 1 lb.)
3/4 cup butter or margarine, divided
1 cup water
1 cup flour
4 eggs, unbeaten
1 envelope (1-3/8 oz.) dehydrated onion soup mix.
In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 1/4 cup butter.  Add
chicken livers and saute for 6 to 8 minutes; chop finely.
In a saucepan over medium heat, melt remaining butter with
water.  Add flour all at once and stir vigorously until
ball forms in center of pan.  Add eggs, one at a time,
beating after each egg.  Stir in livers and soup mix.
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Drop by teaspoonful on baking sheet
and bake for 25 to 30 minutes until puffed and golden
brown.
CHICKEN LIVER PATE  Makes 12
I like this on rye crackers.
12 chicken livers (about 1 lb.)
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 medium onion, finely chopped
4 eggs, hard cooked
1/2 teaspoon Tabasco
In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter.  Add
livers and onions and saute for 8 to 10 minutes.  Put all
ingredients in blender or food processor and blend until
smooth.
CHICKEN PARTY SANDWICH FILLINGMakes approximately 50
Try using different shaped cookie cutters or use different
colors of bread.  It's nice on open sandwiches--garnished
with an olive slice or a lemon sliver.
1 cup cooked, ground chicken
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons milk
1 teaspoon sugar
In a bowl combine all ingredients.  Spread on bread or
salted crackers.
CHICKEN QUICHE  Makes 32 narrow wedges
For an attractive and professional presentation, make
miniature quiches by lining the inside bottom of your
muffin pans with pie dough, forming little tart shells.
Then add the filling. I see a lot of these at Washington
parties.
1 tablespoon butter or margarine, softened
2 pie shells (approximately 9")
1 cup cooked chicken cut in small pieces
1 cup grated Swiss cheese
12 slices crisp, cooked bacon, crumbled
4 eggs, slightly beaten
2 cups heavy cream
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
Preheat oven to 425oF.  Rub butter or margarine on pie
shells.  Put chicken, grated cheese and bacon in pie
shells.  In a mixing bowl combine all remaining ingredients
and pour into shells.  Bake for 15 minutes.  Reduce heat to
300oF and bake 40 minutes longer.  Cut in narrow pie wedges
for serving.
PHOTO:  A storybook reception - garden dining on Chicken...
- 6


CURRIED CHICKEN AND FRUIT KEBABS WITH YOGURT SAUCE        Makes 25-30

Be sure to look at the accompanying illustration.  This
looks good as well as tastes good.
1 roaster boneless breast
2 tablespoons curry powder
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 can (20-ounces) pineapple chunks, well drained
1/2 pound (about 60) seedless grapes
60 cocktail toothpicks
Yogurt Sauce in Zucchini Cups (recipe follows)
Cut breast into 50 to 60 bite-sized chunks.  Place chicken
chunks in large bowl; add curry powder and salt; toss
together.  In a large, heavy non-stick skillet over medium
heat, heat oil.  Add curried chicken chunks; reduce heat to
low and saute for 10 minutes, turning to cook all sides.
Cover and remove from heat; cool.
Thread cooled chicken onto toothpicks with a chunk of
pineapple and a grape.  Serve with Yogurt Sauce as dip.
YOGURT SAUCE IN ZUCCHINI CUPS for Curried Chicken and Fruit
Kebabs
1 container (16-ounces) plain yogurt
3 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons minced fresh coriander
  (also called cilantro or Chinese parsley) or 1/2 teaspoon
ground coriander   seed
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
4 or 5 medium-sized zucchini, optional
In medium-sized bowl, combine yogurt, honey, coriander,
ginger and lemon juice.  If desired, spoon into individual
zucchini cups for each guest.  To make cups, cut each
zucchini crosswise into 6 equal pieces.  Use a melon baller
to scoop out centers from one end of each piece.

ORIENTAL MINI DRUMSTICKSMakes about 54
If the honey you're planning on using for this recipe has
been around awhile and crystallized, you can re-liquify it
by heating the opened jar gently in hot water.  You can do
the same thing in the microwave, but do it at low power and
take the honey out as soon as it's become liquid again.
Don't heat the honey for longer than it takes to re-
liquify; you would lose some of the delicate flavor.
30 chicken wings
1 bottle (5-ounces) teriyaki sauce
1/4 cup peanut or vegetable oil
1/4 cup honey
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 cups lightly toasted, finely-chopped peanuts or pecans
With sharp, kitchen knife, divide wings into three
sections, cutting between joints -- not bone.  Reserve
first and middle joints for mini drumsticks; set wing tips
aside for stock or another use.
To make mini drums from the first joint:  Using a small
sharp knife, cut around the narrower end to loosen meat.
Then, use knife blade to gently scrape meat down toward the
larger, knobby end of bone, turning meat inside out.  To
make mini drums from middle joints:  Cut around the
narrower end; cut tendons away and loosen meat.  Then use
knife blade to gently scrape meat along both bones toward
the larger end.  Pull out smaller bone, detaching with
knife if necessary.  Turn meat inside out around knob of
remaining bone.
In large bowl, combine teriyaki sauce, oil, honey, vinegar
and ginger; mix well.  Add chicken and coat well.  Cover
and marinate overnight in refrigerator.  Preheat oven to
3250F.  Grease 2 large baking sheets with sides; arrange
chicken on baking sheets.  Bake for 35 minutes or until
cooked through.  Remove and roll in chopped nuts.  Serve
hot or at room temperature.

SANTA FE CHICKEN QUESADILLAS (Kay sa diyas)Makes about 64
If you want to make this way ahead of time, you can cool
and then freeze the ungarnished quesadilla wedges between
layers of aluminum foil.  Reheat in preheated 3000F oven
for 20 minutes and then add the garnish.
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
2 cloves garlic
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cans (4-ounces each) chopped mild green chilies
1 minced, canned or fresh Jalapeno pepper (optional)
16 flour tortillas (8 inches each)
8 tablespoons minced fresh coriander (also called cilantro
or Chinese parsley),    optional
1 pound Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese, grated
Mexican salsa or slivers of avocado sprinkled with lemon
juice,
chopped tomato, and coriander sprigs
Cut each thigh into 4 pieces.  In container of food
processor fitted with steel blade, finely mince garlic.
Gradually add chicken pieces, cumin, salt and pepper; grind
to a fine texture.
 In a large heavy, non-stick skillet, heat oil.  Add ground
chicken mixture and cook over medium heat, stirring often.
Cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until meat is no longer pink.
Preheat oven to 3000F.  Drain chilies and add to cooked
chicken.  Place 8 tortillas on 2 large baking sheets and
brush lightly with water.  Divide chicken mixture among the
8 tortillas, spreading a thin layer almost to the edges.
Sprinkle with chopped coriander and grated cheese; top with
remaining tortillas, pressing down edges to seal.  Brush
lightly with water and bake for 15 minutes.  Remove from
oven and cut each quesadilla into 8 wedges.  If desired,
serve with Mexican salsa or top with avocado, tomato and
coriander.
SHERRY FRIED CHICKEN LIVERS  Makes 12
I know people who didn't think they could lik think they
could like chicken livers who are won over when the flavor
of sherry wine is added.
12 chicken livers (about 1 lb.)
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 1/2 teaspoons salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup dry sherry
In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter.  Add
chicken livers and saute for 6 to 8 minutes.  Sprinkle with
salt and pepper.   Add sherry, cover, and simmer 5 minutes
longer or until cooked through.  Serve on toothpicks.

BLUE CHEESE CHICKEN SPREADMakes about 40
Although I usually prefer fresh products to canned ones, in
this case I recommend using canned pineapple. Fresh
pineapple has an unusual characteristic that's worth
knowing. It contains the enzyme bromelin which breaks down
protein.  The blue cheese in this recipe is rich in protein
and fresh pineapple would not work well with it, unless you
added it just before serving so the bromelin doesn't have a
chance to break down the proteins and give it an off-
flavor. Canned pineapple, on the other hand, doesn't have
enough active bromelin to cause a problem.
Makes approx. 40 party sandwiches (1 tablespoon per
sandwich)
1 cup cooked, ground chicken
1 jar (5 oz.) blue cheese spread
1/2 cup drained, crushed pineapple
1/2 cup chopped almonds, lightly toasted
Salt and ground pepper to taste
In a bowl combine chicken with remaining ingredients.  Use
as filling for party sandwiches.
MAIN COURSES - 7
CHICKEN CORDON BLEU FOR A CROWD Serves 15-20
There are many recipes for Chicken Cordon Bleu, but I like
this one because you can do everything the day before.
Reheat it in the microwave.  Don't, however, freeze it.
Fried foods tend to get a "warmed over" taste after
freezing.  Also, don't hold it in the refrigerator for
longer than a day.
And finally, when reheating it in the microwave, be sure to
rotate it several times so that you don't have uneven
warming. (Rotating the food in the oven performs the same
function as stirring a pot. If you don't rotate it, you
risk having some parts overcooked$and overcooked chicken is
tough chicken.)
20 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1 cup butter or margarine, melted
1/3 cup minced, fresh parsley
20 slices Canadian bacon or ham
20 slices sharp or Swiss cheese
3 eggs, beaten
2 cups bread crumbs
Slice each breast half almost in half lengthwise and then
open like the wings of a butterfly. Brush with melted
butter  and sprinkle with parsley.  Place slice of bacon or
ham and slice of cheese on each chicken breast, folding to
fit.  Roll, jelly-roll fashion, and secure with toothpicks.
Dip in beaten eggs and roll in bread crumbs.  Fry in deep
fat at 350oF for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown and
cooked through..  Remove toothpicks before serving. Keep
warm in a preheated 325oF if serving within 30 minutes or
reheat in a preheated 350oF for 10 to 15 minutes.
CHICKEN SALAD HAWAIIANServes 12-15
This recipe is good for a summer lunch.  You should keep it
cold until serving, but contrary to popular belief,
mayonnaise itself isn't particularly dangerous from a food
safety point of view.  Mayonnaise in its usual commercial
formulations is acid enough to be mildly protective against
harmful microorganisms.  But it's not protective enough, so
don't take chances and do keep this refrigerated until you
need it.
6 cups cooked chicken, cut in chunks
1-1/2 cups mayonnaise or salad dressing
2 cups chopped celery
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 can (#2 size or 2 1/2 cups) pineapple tidbits, drained
1/2 cup slivered almonds, lightly toasted, divided
In a large mixing bowl combine chicken, mayonnaise, celery
and soy sauce.  Gently fold in pineapple and half of almond
slivers.  Serve salad on a platter lined with lettuce
leaves.  Garnish with remaining almonds.
CREAMED CHICKEN VICTORIAServes 10-12
This is a good buffet dish because your guests don't have
to cut anything while balancing their dinner plates on
their laps. I've expanded it to feed as many as 60 people,
and it always draws raves.  As an additional bonus, it's at
least as good the next day for leftovers.  You may find, as
I have, that it's easier to add the flour right after
sauteing the mushrooms and skip sauteing the chicken.  You
can also use leftover chicken and skip cooking the roaster
breasts; I've done it and it works just fine. The original
recipe called for twice as much mustard. If you like your
foods quite spicy, you may want to use the four teaspoons
of mustard that the original recipe called for.
2 whole roaster breasts, 2-1/2 to 3 pounds each
8 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
1/2 cup flour
2 teaspoons dry mustard
salt to taste, depending on saltiness of the broth
1/2 teaspoon Cayenne pepper or to taste
2 cups light cream or half and half
1 cup dry sherry
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
Puffed Pastry Hearts (recipe follows) or toast points
In 4-quart Dutch oven or large, deep skillet over high
heat, bring chicken broth to a boil.  Add roaster breasts
and enough water to cover, if necessary.  Reduce heat to
low; simmer for 70 minutes.  Cool breasts in broth.  Remove
and cut into 1/2-inch dice; discard bones and skin.
Reserve 2 cups broth for recipe; save remainder for another
use.
In same Dutch oven or skillet over medium-high heat, melt
butter; add mushrooms and saute 30 seconds.  Add diced
chicken and saute 30 seconds longer.  Stir in flour,
seasonings, 2 cups reserved broth and cream; bring to a
simmer.  Reduce heat to low and simmer 5 minutes, stirring
frequently.  Add sherry, Parmesan cheese and parsley.
Simmer 1 minute longer.  Serve chicken with Puff Pastry
Hearts or toast points.
PUFF PASTRY HEARTS to go with Chicken Victoria
You can bake the Puff Pastry Hearts 1 or 2 days in advance.
Store thoroughly-cooled hearts in an airtight container.
1 package (17-1/2-ounces) frozen puff pastry
1 3-inch heart-shaped cookie cutter
1 whole egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water
Defrost pastry 20 minutes at room temperature.  Preheat
oven to 375F.  Open one sheet at a time onto a lightly-
floured board.  Cut hearts from pastry and place on two
dampened cookie sheets.  Pierce hearts with tines of a
fork.  Then, using the back of a small knife, decorate tops
and edges.  Brush tops lightly with egg wash.  Bake 20
minutes or until golden.

CURRIED CHICKEN RAJServes 10-12
This is another dish that works well for a buffet. It's
easy to serve and easy to eat since the guests don't need
to cut anything.
2 whole roaster breasts 2 and 1/2 to 3 pounds each
1/2 cup butter or margarine
8 cups chicken broth
3/4 cup raisins
1/4 cup curry powder
1/2 cup flour
1-1/4 teaspoons salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
2 cups light cream or half and half
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
Puffed Pastry Hearts
(see recipe) or toast points
Chutney, slivered toasted almonds, other condiments,
optional
In 4-quart Dutch oven or large, deep skillet over high
heat, bring chicken broth to a boil.  Add roaster breasts
and enough water to cover, if necessary.  Reduce heat to
low; simmer chicken for 70 minutes.  Cool chicken in broth.
Remove meat and cut into 1/2-inch cubes; discard skin and
bones.  Reserve 3 cups broth for recipe; save remainder for
another use.
In same Dutch oven or skillet over medium-high heat, melt
butter, stir in chicken, raisins, and curry powder; saute
for 1 minute.  Stir in flour, seasonings, reserved 3 cups
broth, and cream; bring to a simmer.  Reduce heat to low
and simmer 5 minutes, stirring frequently.  Stir in
parsley.  Serve chicken with Puff Pastry Hearts or toast
points, accompanied by chutney, toasted almonds, or other
condiments, if desired.

JUST PLAIN BARBECUED CHICKEN Serves 50
If you visit the Delmarva Peninsula (Delaware, Maryland,
Virginia) in summer, you may come across some of the
chicken barbecues that take place here.  This is one of the
popular recipes for crowds.
50 chicken breast halves
25 drumsticks
2 quarts oil
2 quarts vinegar
8 tablespoons salt or to taste
3 tablespoons ground pepper
In a 2 gallon container, combine oil, vinegar, salt and
pepper.  Grill chicken 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals
for 20 to 30 minutes or until cooked through.  Turn and
brush with sauce every 10 to 15 minutes.

SWEET 'N SMOKEY CHICKEN                              Serves
30-40
My step daughter-in-law, Jan Perdue, says that when Frank's
son Jim was courting her, he invited her over for dinner
and served Sweet 'n Smokey Chicken for two.  Jan was
enchanted with his culinary skill and thought that this
would be a sample of what marriage to him would be like.
She learned later that this is just about the only thing he
cooks.  Fortunately, she enjoys cooking and doesn't mind.
30 chicken breast halves
15 chicken drumsticks
15 chicken thighs
8 medium onions, sliced
2 quarts ketchup
1 cup prepared mustard
2 cups vinegar
1 quart maple syrup
1/4 cup hickory smoked salt or to taste
2 teaspoons ground pepper
Preheat oven to 350oF. Place chicken in a single layer,
skin side up on top of onion slices in the bottom of 2 to 3
large baking pans.  If possible keep breast halves in a
separate pan from legs and thighs as they will cook more
quickly.  In a 2 gallon container combine remaining
ingredients and pour over chicken.  Bake chicken, uncovered
for 45 to 60 minutes or until cooked through.  Check breast
meat for doneness after 45 minutes.

TREASURE ISLAND CHICKENServes 30-40
A school-lunch chicken recipe contest produced this one.
The winner adapted it from an old family recipe.
30 chicken breast halves
15 chicken drumsticks
15 chicken thighs
1/2 pound butter or margarine
1/2 cup flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon dry mustard
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 quart orange juice
2 tablespoons salt or to taste
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Place chicken in single layer, skin
side up, in 2 to 3 large baking pans.  Keep breast halves
in a separate pan as they will cook more quickly than the
legs and thighs.  In a large saucepan over medium heat,
melt butter.  Stir in flour, sugar, spices, orange juice
and salt and cook, stirring constantly until thickened.
Pour sauce over chicken.  Bake, uncovered, for 45 to 60
minutes or until cooked through.  Check breast meat for
doneness after 45 minutes.
TEXAS BARBECUED BREASTSServes 10-16
Turn chicken breasts with tongs instead of a fork, which
could pierce the meat and cause it to lose some of its
juiciness.
1 cup tomato sauce
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup chili sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
3 tablespoons grated onion
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon Tabasco (optional)
16 chicken breast halves
In a large saucepan over medium heat combine all
ingredients except chicken and bring to a boil.  Grill
chicken 5 to 6 inches above medium-hot coals for 25 to 30
minutes or until cooked through.  Turn and baste 3 to 4
times with sauce during cooking.














CHAPTER SEVEN$
CHICKEN FOR TOMORROW$OR NEXT WEEK.


In an ideal world, we'd always have food at its
freshest and we'd eat it right after it was prepared.  In
the real world, though, there are many, many times when
cooking ahead is useful.  You're giving a party and you
don't want to be frazzled the day of the event. Or you've
got a busy week coming up and you want to do better by your
family than just giving them calorie-laden, greasy take-out
food. Or you're having house guests, and you want to spend
the time with them instead of in the kitchen.  Or maybe
there's only one or two of you at home, and you've
discovered that it's simpler to make a recipe for four and
freeze part of it for use later.

In my own case, my freezer is always full.  One reason
is that Frank often invites three or four people the last
minute, and it helps to have emergency food on hand.
Equally often, after I've made a meal, he'll call at 6:00
p.m. and tell me that we're eating out with one of the
poultry distributors or suppliers, and I end up freezing
what I've just cooked.  As I wrap the food in foil and
wedge it into the freezer, I remind myself, "This meal
isn't going to waste, it's a head start on a future meal."

When you know the principles for successful
freezing$and I'll get to them in a moment$you can freeze
just about any of the recipes in this cookbook. The recipes
in this chapter are different from the rest because they
not only can be cooked ahead, often they  should be cooked
ahead.  Some of them require marination, others improve
with age, and still others adapt so well to cooking the day
before that they belong in this chapter. Use this chapter
for recipes to use when you want to cook a day or so ahead
of time, and also, use it for tips on how to freeze foods
successfully.

There are just a few principles needed to master the
technique of cooking ahead, and once you know them, you'll
have faster, better-tasting, healthier and safer meals to
show for it.

_The biggest boon to food preparation ahead is the
freezer.  Everything freezes from the point of view of food
safety, but there's a lot of variation in palatability. For
best flavor and texture, don't freeze the following foods
in your home freezer:

        _Milk products $ they'll curdle.

        _Boiled eggs $  the whites get watery.

        _Custards $ they'll lose texture, get lumpy.

        _Mayonnaise $ it may separate.

        _Most foods that you fry at home (except french
fries and onions) $ they can get an unattractive "warmed-
over" taste.  It's actually the fats turning slightly
rancid.

        _Cooked potatoes $ they darken and get an
unattractive texture. (If you're going to freeze stew, add
cooked potatoes later on when you're reheating the stew.)

        _Fresh greens, celery, and carrots $ they get
limp.

        _Fresh tomatoes $  their high water content
causes them to collapse when thawed. (However, you can
freeze tomatoes if you're going to use them in a cooked
form, such as in a pasta sauce.)

        _Gravy $ the fat will separate out and puddle.
(If you must freeze gravy, cut way back on the fat when
you're making the gravy, and stir constantly when you're
reheating it so as to keep the fat from separating.)

        _Heavily spiced foods $ most herbs, salts,
onions, fade away, but garlic and cloves will seem more
intense.   Pepper has a tendency to turn bitter. Curry
takes on a musty flavor.

        _Synthetic flavors $ use real vanilla rather than
synthetic because synthetic vanilla can have an off-flavor
after freezing.

        _Highly salted foods $ salt tends to attract
moisture and uneven freezing may result because salt slows
down the freezing process.

_Even if you're freezing food for only a couple of
days, be careful of packaging. Air that's in the package
will affect the color, flavor and texture.  The container
should be air tight, or the food will get freezer burn and
lose nutritional value, and palatability.

_It's critical to have a both your refrigerator and
freezer cold enough.  The best indicator of a good freezer
temperature is brick-hard ice cream. If ice cream stored in
your freezer is soft, turn the control to a colder setting.
As for the refrigerator, check the drinking temperature of
milk.  If it's very cold, you've probably hit 40 degrees,
which is what you're aiming for.  If the milk isn't cold
enough, or if it sours too quickly, move the control to a
colder setting.

_Here's a great tip if you're freezing chicken in a
polyethylene bag:  lower the bag, with the chicken in it,
into a pan of water to force out the air.  Be sure the bag
opening is above water.  Press entire surface area of bag
to squeeze out air bubbles.  Twist end of bag and fold
over.  Secure with fastener and label.

_Here's a convenient way to freeze casseroles for
later use that Joy Schrage from Whirlpool Corporation told
me:

                1.  Line the casserole dish with foil,
leaving 2" collar all around.

                2.  Add casserole ingredients and bake.

                3.  Cool and freeze in uncovered casserole

                4.  When frozen, lift casserole and foil out
in one piece

                5. Cover with foil or place in a
polyethylene freezer bag. Press air out, then seal tightly,
label, date and freeze. Place in a polyethylene freezer
bag.

                6.  To thaw, take frozen casserole out of
bag and foil, and place in the casserole dish it was
originally baked in.

This type of freezing frees the casserole dish for
other uses while the    casserole is in the freezer.

_Homemade "TV" dinners:  Place leftovers in serving
portions on sectioned plastic trays.  Cover, chill, tightly
with plastic wrap and seal.  Then wrap entire tray in foil.
Label, date and freeze.  To reheat, remove foil, puncture
plastic wrap to make steam vents, and heat dinner in
microwave.

_To keep chicken pieces from sticking together in your
freezer so that you can take out just the quantity you want
without prying several pieces apart or thawing more than
you need, do the following:

        1.  Spread pieces in a single layer on a cookie
sheet

        2.  Place unwrapped in freezer

        3.  Once frozen, remove chicken pieces from
cookie sheet, and store in polyethylene freezer bag

        5.  Place bag in freezer, label and date

_Freezing tip - use freezing tape to seal freezer wrap
or suitable plastic wrap.  Freezer tape is made with a
special adhesive designed to stick at low temperatures.

_Whole birds to be roasted should be thawed before
cooking.  Broilers, and birds to be cooked by other methods
can start being cooked when thawed enough for pieces to
separate.

If you'll follow the suggestions above, you'll find
that most of the foods you cook can be prepared ahead of
time and if necessary, frozen.  This means that, with the
exception of fried foods, just about all the recipes in
this book can be considered cook-ahead foods.

So, whether you're cooking for a party, for the week's
meals, for houseguests, or for yourself, enjoy the recipes
that follow$and all the others in this book as well.
CRISPY CORNISH A LA BLEUServes 2
There are easily 50 varieties of blue vein cheeses for sale
in this country. Probably the most famous are the French
Roqueforta, the Italian Gorgonzola, the English Stilton,
and the American Treasure Cavea. Personally, I like the
American varieties best.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
Oil for deep frying
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup sour cream
1/4 cup minced onion
1/4 cup crumbled bleu cheese
1 small clove garlic, minced
Celery sticks
Cut hens into 8 pieces each.  Fry in deep hot oil at 375F,
turning once, until golden brown on both sides, about ten
minutes. Drain well on paper towels.  Refrigerate if not
serving right away.
In a small bowl combine remaining ingredients except
celery.  Cover and chill.  Serve hens warm, at room
temperature or cold with bleu cheese dip and celery sticks.
CHICKEN SOUFFLEServes 4
This is a nice prepare-ahead item.  It's really  best if
stored overnight in the refrigerator before baking so the
flavors have a chance to blend.
4 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon minced, fresh thyme or 1/4 teaspoon dried
1 teaspoon minced, fresh basil or 1/4 teaspoon dried
Ground pepper to taste
2 cups cooked, shredded chicken
1/4 pound ham, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese, divided
3 cups chicken broth
1/2 loaf (5 ounces) Italian bread, roughly torn into chunks
1 cup grated mozzarella cheese
In a mixing bowl combine eggs, thyme, basil and pepper.
Add chicken, ham, parsley, 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese and
broth.  Combine thoroughly and set aside.  Butter an 8" x
12" baking dish.  Place bread chunks in the bottom.  Cover
with egg mixture followed by Mozzarella cheese and
remaining Parmesan.  Refrigerate 1 hour or longer.  Preheat
oven to 350oF. Bake for 45 minutes until puffed and golden
brown.

CHICKEN AND STUFFINGServes 6
I wouldn't serve this to a gourmet club, but it's an easy,
cook ahead dish for a relaxed family meal when you don't
want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen.  It's also an
ideal way to have the taste of stuffed chicken -- with
easier serving qualities. You can make it ahead of time, up
to the point of baking.
2 cans (10-1/2-ounces each) condensed cream of chicken
soup, divided
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) chicken broth
2 eggs, beaten
1 package (7-1/2-ounces) herb seasoned stuffing mix
3 cups cooked chicken, cut in chunks
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup milk
2 tablespoons chopped canned pimento
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a mixing bowl whisk together one
can of undiluted soup, broth and eggs. Add stuffing mix and
toss.  Place stuffing in bottom of a baking dish.  Arrange
chicken on top of stuffing and sprinkle with salt and
pepper.  In a large measuring cup combine remaining can of
soup and milk and pimento and pour over all.  Bake,
uncovered, for 35 to 45 minutes or until hot and bubbling..

CHICK-O-TATO CASSEROLE Serves 4-6
This tastes better reheated, after the flavors have had a
chance to blend. You can make it today and it will taste
better tomorrow.
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup ketchup
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
4 medium potatoes, peeled and thickly sliced
Preheat oven to 350F.  In a large skillet, over medium
heat, heat oil.  Add onion, celery and green pepper and
cook, stirring often, for 6 to 8 minutes or until softened.
Add ketchup, water, vinegar, sugar, Worcestershire sauce,
mustard, salt and pepper and simmer at low heat for about
15 minutes.  Place chicken in bottom of a baking dish and
tuck potatoes around chicken pieces.  Pour sauce over all.
Bake, covered, for 50 to 60 minutes or until cooked
through.  If planning to re-heat, remove from oven when
slightly under cooked.
CHOICE CHEESY CHICKEN Serves 4-6
 There's no last minute attention required for this recipe.
Prepare it a day ahead, right up to the point of baking.
1 clove garlic, peeled
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
1 cup bread crumbs
1/2 cup grated sharp Cheddar cheese
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
6 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
With the broad side of a large kitchen knife crush garlic
slightly to release flavor.  In a small saucepan over low
heat melt butter with garlic clove.  Set butter aside for
1/2 hour for maximum garlic flavoring.  On a sheet of wax
paper combine bread crumbs, cheeses, salt and pepper.  Dip
chicken in garlic butter, then roll in cheese mixture.
Tuck sides under to form a neat roll.  Arrange chicken in a
large shallow baking pan and drizzle with any remaining
butter.  Cover and refrigerate if making ahead.  When ready
to bake, preheat oven to 350oF.  Bake chicken for 35 to 45
minutes or until crisp, golden and cooked through.
PHOTO:  New Year's Eve - Cold "Chicken Tonnato" Buffet

COLD CHICKEN TONNATOServes 6-8
This is an elegant company recipe, and it works well if you
make it the day before. I've made it with water-packed
tuna, but oil-packed would work also.
8 chicken cutlets (about 2 pounds skinless, boneless
chicken breast halves, pounded thin, or 2 thin sliced
boneless roaster breasts)
1/2 cup flour, seasoned with salt and ground pepper to
taste
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
2 cans (13-ounces) tuna, drained
8 anchovies
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 cup olive oil
4 tablespoons white vinegar
4 tablespoons light cream
2 tablespoons capers
Dip cutlets in flour to coat lightly, shake off excess.  In
a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter.  Add
cutlets and saute until cooked through, about 5 minutes;
turn once.  Drain cutlets on paper towels.  Chill.  In a
blender or food processor, combine tuna, anchovies, garlic,
oil, vinegar and light cream.  Blend until pureed.  Pour
sauce over cold cutlets, sprinkle with capers.  May be
loosely covered and refrigerated overnight before serving.

EASY CHICKEN CORDON BLEUServes 4
This is another recipe that can be fixed, except for
frying, on the day before.  For variation, try Swiss cheese
and Canadian bacon.  For a sauce, make a white sauce with
chicken broth. If you're in a hurry, undiluted cream of
chicken soup makes a handy substitute, but it's definitely
a second choice compared to a good, homemade white sauce.
Garnish with parsley sprig.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster                                       breast
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
4 slices ham
4 slices sharp cheese
1 egg, beaten
1 cup bread crumbs
Place chicken between sheets of plastic wrap and pound to
1/4 inch thickness.  Skip the preceding step if you're
using the thin sliced boneless roaster breast. Spread
chicken with butter and sprinkle with parsley.  Place a
slice of ham and a slice of cheese on each chicken breast,
folding to fit.  Roll, jelly-roll fashion, and secure with
toothpicks.  Dip chicken in beaten egg and roll in bread
crumbs.  Fry in deep fat at 350oF for 12-15 minutes or
until golden brown and cooked through.  Remove toothpicks
before serving.

FIESTA TORTILLA STACK                                                   6-8
servings
The flavors in this recipe blend and get better if you make
it the day before, but I have also served it the same day
when I was in a hurry.  It does need at least a couple of
hours for the flavors to develop. I've made this recipe
with coriander and without; it works well either way.
Coriander, by the way, is also known as cilantro or Chinese
parsley, so if you can't find "coriander" in your market,
look for it by its other names.
1 cup cooked, shredded chicken
1/2 cup mayonnaise
3 tablespoons chopped, fresh, cilantro (also called
coriander or Chinese parsley), if available
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese
1 can (7 ounces) whole kernel corn, drained
2 tablespoons taco seasoning mix
1 dozen 8-inch flour tortillas
Cherry tomatoes
1 small head lettuce
In a mixing bowl combine chicken, mayonnaise, cilantro and
salt.  In a separate small bowl combine cream cheese
drained corn and taco seasoning mix.  Place 2 flour
tortillas, one on top of other.  Spread with 1/3 of chicken
mixture, then two tortillas and corn mixture.  Continue
until mixtures are used up.
Chill for at least 4 hours to develop flavors.  Remove from
refrigerator half an hour before serving.  Garnish with
tomatoes and serve on a bed of lettuce.

GARDEN BREAST CHEVREServes 4
Chevre means goat in French, and the title of this recipe
comes from the goat cheese in it. Frank, by the way, loves
goat cheese.
1 whole roaster breast
salt and ground pepper to taste
6 ounces mild creamy goat cheese or cream cheese, softened
1 medium carrot, coarsely grated
1 small zucchini, unpeeled and coarsely grated
1/4 cup snipped fresh or frozen chives
2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary or 1/2 teaspoon dried
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Preheat oven to 375o F.  Working from the top of the breast
use finger tips to carefully loosen the skin from the meat
on the breast to form a pocket.  Do not detach skin on
sides or at base of breast..  Combine cheese, carrot,
zucchini, chives, rosemary and salt and pepper.  Stuff
vegetable mixture evenly under skin of breast.  Brush with
oil and place skin side up in a roasting pan.  Bake for
about one hour and 15 minutes or until juices run clear
with no hint of pink when a cut is made near the bone.
Chill, wrap tightly and refrigerate if not serving
immediately.  It's good served at room temperature, but
it's also good reheated.

COLD CORNISHServes 2
To get the best flavor from the green beans in this recipe,
choose ones that are fresh and young. The bean growers say
that if the bean is fresh, it will snap easily when broken.
If it bends instead of snapping, the bean has been around
too long.  Also, check the maturity of the developing seeds
inside the pods. You want the seeds to be immature, and you
can tell this by making sure that they don't bulge inside
the pods. If the seeds are bulging, you can count on the
green beans being tough and leathery.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 large tomatoes, coarsely chopped, or 1 can (16 ounces)
whole tomatoes,         chopped, drained
1 medium zucchini, sliced
1 cup fresh green beans, cut into 2-inch lengths
4 scallions, sliced
1/4 cup minced fresh basil or 1 tablespoon dried
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup chicken broth
1/3 cup Feta cheese (optional)
Quarter hens, remove backbones.  In a large skillet, over
medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add hens and brown on all
sides, 12 to 15 minutes. Add remaining ingredients.  Cover
and simmer 20 minutes or until hens are cooked through.
Refrigerate.  Serve cold,  sprinkled with cheese.

KICK-OFF KABOBSServes 6
Frank is an avid sports fan, and he constantly astonishes
his friends by knowing obscure facts and dates concerning
the various players and games.  This is a an easy dish to
serve your sports fans.
6 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
1/4 cup flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 egg, slightly beaten
2 tablespoons water
1/2 cup fine dry bread crumbs
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
Preheat oven to 375oF.  On a sheet of wax paper, combine
flour, salt and pepper.  In a shallow dish beat together
egg and water.  On a separate sheet of wax paper blend
bread crumbs and cheese.   Dip chicken into flour, then
egg, then bread crumb mixture turning to coat well on both
sides.   Arrange chicken in a buttered baking dish.  Dot
with remaining butter.  Bake for 15 minutes.  Turn and bake
15 to 20 minutes longer or until cooked through.  Cut each
breast half into four pieces and thread onto wooden
skewers.  Wrap in foil or place in plastic container and
refrigerate until needed.  Serve with assorted dips.
Herbed Sour Cream Dip - In a small bowl combine 1 cup sour
cream, 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley, 1 teaspoon dried
tarragon, 2 tablespoons minced scallions, 2 tablespoons
snipped fresh or frozen chives, and 1/2 teaspoon salt or to
taste.
Instant Spiced Dip - In a small bowl blend together 1 cup
mayonnaise, 1/4 cup bottled French dressing, 1/4 cup chili
sauce, 1 teaspoon horseradish sauce, 1 teaspoon
Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard, 2 cloves
garlic, minced and salt to taste.  (If you're in a hurry,
substitute 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt for the fresh garlic
and the salt.)

MARINATED BROILED CHICKEN Serves 2-4
Marinating provides an opportunity for flavors to penetrate
the chicken.  The marinating time can vary tremendously and
the results will still be tasty. I like to marinate
overnight, in the refrigerator, but even three hours can
add a lot to the flavor or your chicken.
1 chicken, cut in half lengthwise
1/2 cup peanut or vegetable oil
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon minced, fresh ginger or 1 teaspoon ground
2 cloves garlic, minced
Salt to taste
Place chicken in a shallow dish.  Add remaining ingredients
and turn to coat well.  Cover and marinate refrigerated for
at least 3 hours.  Place chicken skin side down on broiler
rack.  Pour half of marinade mixture in cavity of chicken.
Broil 9 to 10 inches from broiler for about 30 minutes.
Turn chicken, brush with remaining mixture.  Broil 20 to 30
minutes longer or until cooked through.

OVEN-BRAISED ROASTER BREAST WITH VEGETABLES     Serves 4-6
Making this dish the day before has a couple of advantages.
Any fat will rise to the top where it's easy to remove and
also the wine and herbs "marry" with the other  flavors.
1 whole roaster breast
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
8 small white onions (about 1/2 pound)
1-1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/3 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon minced, fresh tarragon or 1 teaspoon dried
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
8 small potatoes, peeled
8 baby carrots
2 cups broccoli florets
1/4 cup milk
1-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In 5-quart oven-proof Dutch oven or
saucepot over medium-high heat, heat oil.  Add roaster
breast;  cook 15 to 20 minutes turning until browned on all
sides.  Remove and set aside.  Add onions, cook 2 to 3
minutes or until lightly browned, stirring frequently.
Remove onions; pour off excess fat.  Return roaster breast
to Dutch oven.  Add broth, wine, tarragon and pepper; bring
to a boil.  Add potatoes; cover and bake 30 minutes.  Add
onions and carrots; cover.  Bake 30 minutes longer or until
roaster breast and vegetables are almost tender.  Add
broccoli; cover.  Bake 8 to 10 minutes longer or until
roaster breast is cooked through and vegetables are tender.
(Prepare to this point and refrigerate overnight, if
desired.) Remove roaster breast and vegetables to serving
platter; keep warm.  In small bowl, stir together milk and
cornstarch until smooth; stir into liquid in Dutch oven.
Over medium heat, bring to boil; boil l minute, stirring
constantly.  Serve sauce with roaster breast and
vegetables.

PARMESAN BREASTServes 4
Parmesan cheese is a "cooking cheese" and is usually used
in its grated form in the United States.  When young, it's
mild and nutty, but with age is acquires a sharply tangy
flavor. When it's too old, it gives an off-flavor to foods,
so check the shelf life on the container. When it doubt,
taste it.
1 whole roaster breast
2 cups cooked rice
1 cup fresh chopped spinach (or 1/2 package frozen, thawed
and drained)
1/2 cup minced fresh basil, or 2 tablespoons dried
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
1 egg
2 tablespoons milk
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon for basting
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Salt and ground pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Season breast to taste with salt
and pepper.  In a mixing bowl combine remaining
ingredients.  Stuff breast cavity with rice and place a
sheet of aluminum foil over cavity to hold in stuffing.
Carefully turn breast over and place skin side up in a
roasting pan.  Spoon any remaining rice around breast.
Baste chicken with oil and bake for about one hour and 30
minutes or until juices run clear with no hint of pink when
a cut is made near the bone.  Chill, wrap tightly, and
refrigerate for 24 hours to give flavors a chance to blend.
You can serve it warm or at room temperature.
SALISBURY CHICKEN BREASTS  Serves 6-8
The name "Salisbury," when used with steak means that the
beef will be chopped or ground.  This recipe has nothing to
do with chopped meat; in this case "Salisbury" refers to
the town on Maryland's Eastern Shore where the Perdue Farms
headquarters is located.
You can prepare this a day ahead of time right up to the
point of baking.
8 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or two thin
sliced boneless roaster         breasts
1/2 cup flour
1-1/2 teaspoons salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup bread crumbs
3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh sage or 1/4 teaspoon dried
3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh rosemary or 1/4 teaspoon dried
3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh thyme or 1/4 teaspoon dried
2 eggs
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, melted
1/2 cup Sauterne wine
8 slices mozzarella cheese
Preheat oven to 350oF.  On a sheet of wax paper, combine
flour, salt and pepper.  In a shallow bowl beat eggs.  On a
separate sheet of wax paper combine bread crumbs and
seasonings.  Dip chicken in flour mixture, then eggs, then
crumb mixture.  Roll and secure with toothpicks.  Place in
large shallow baking pan.  Pour melted butter over chicken.
Cover and bake for 20 minutes.  Remove cover.  Pour
Sauterne over chicken.  Bake, uncovered, 30 minutes more.
Fold slices of cheese in half; place one on top of each
roll for last 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.

SECRETARIES' SALADServes 15-25
Perdue home economists developed most of the recipes in
this book, but this recipe is one of the few that is mine.
I served it first at what Frank and I jokingly call the
"Perdue High Holiday," National Secretaries' Day.
That's the day when we honor the people who we know really
make the world go 'round. We usually have about 25 of the
top secretaries from Perdue Headquarters for dinner along
with their husbands to celebrate the day.
1 head lettuce, shredded
1 cup chopped celery
1 large green, red, or yellow pepper, chopped
1 cup thinly sliced carrots or if it's summer, 1 cup
chopped tomato
1 cup chopped scallions
1 cup frozen peas, room temperature, not cooked
1 1/2 cups mayonnaise  (I use Hellmann's)
2 cups cooked, shredded chicken
2-1/2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
In a large glass bowl, layer ingredients in the order
given.  Refrigerate for 24 hours to develop flavors.

PISTACHIO SMOKED CHICKEN SPREAD
The green color and the crunch of the pistachios add a lot
to this spread. Be sure to store the pistachios in an
airtight container after purchase.  Exposure to air affects
the texture of the nuts and causes them to become soggy.
1 package cream cheese (8-ounces), room temperature
1 cup finely chopped cooked chicken
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon liquid smoke
1/4 chopped pistachios
3 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
In a mixing bowl combine ingredients thoroughly.
Refrigerate for 24 hours while flavors blend.  Serve on
crackers, or for a rich and delicious lunch, I have served
it on croissants one time and on bagels another day.

SPICY CORNISH HEN TIDBITSServes 2
This is another of the recipes included in the Perdue
Cornish Hen packages that people have requested from Frank
dozens and dozens of times over the years.  I'm including
the recipe exactly as it originally appeared, but you may
want to substitute fresh garlic (1 clove), fresh onion (1
tablespoon, finely chopped), and fresh celery (2
tablespoons, finely chopped), for the garlic  powder, onion
salt, and celery salt. If you make these substitutions, be
sure to add salt to taste afterwards.
2 fresh Cornish game hens
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion salt
1/4 teaspoon celery salt
1/4 teaspoon lemon pepper or black pepper
1 cup vegetable oil or as needed
1 cup bottled garlic cheese dressing
Cut hens into serving pieces.  Combine dry spices and toss
hens in spices to coat evenly.  Heat oil in large skillet
over medium heat and fry Cornish pieces about 8 minutes on
each side until tender and golden.  Remove and drain on
paper towels.  Arrange on a serving dish.  Cover and
refrigerate overnight.  To serve, dip Cornish pieces into
bottled dressing.  Serve at room temperature.











 CHAPTER EIGHT
CHICKEN FOR HOLIDAYS

If we were back in the 1920s right now, and you were
planning a holiday meal, it would almost certainly not
include chicken$unless you were either lucky or rich.
Having chicken for holidays happens all the time today, but
back then, chicken on the menu was either a sign of
affluence or that you lived on a farm and had your own
chickens.  When Herbert Hoover was using "a chicken in
every pot" as a campaign slogan back in the late 1920s,
chicken was such a rare and expensive treat that people
thought Hoover's promise was about as realistic as
promising them pie in the sky.  Few people believed that
anyone could deliver on that promise.

All this changed because of a fortunate accident that
happened near where Frank grew up on the Eastern Shore of
Maryland.  In 1923, when Mrs. Wilmer Steele, of nearby
Sussex County, was ordering baby chicks for her laying
flock, someone processing the order got a zero wrong.
Instead of the 50 chicks she was counting on, Mrs. Steele
received 500 baby chicks.  She found herself faced with the
twin problems of first, the expense of feeding so many
birds, and second, the hassle of trying to sell more eggs
than the market in Sussex County could possibly absorb.

The solution she came up with changed the eating
patterns not just of Sussex County, but of most of the
world as well.  It also had a lot to do with Frank's future
career.  Up until then, chicken production was no more than
an adjunct to egg production and when someone had chicken
to eat, it was most likely a "spent hen," a tough old bird
which no longer laid a sufficient number of eggs to pay her
feed costs.  Mrs. Steele transformed all this by deciding
to sell all her extra baby chicks for meat when they were
only a few months old and hadn't yet cost her too much in
feed.

The young and tender meat from these birds made them
an instant success.  Consumers loved them, and Mrs. Steele
discovered that raising chickens entirely for meat rather
than for producing eggs, was a lucrative business.

Other egg producers, including Frank and his father,
Arthur W. Perdue, eventually switched over to growing
chickens for meat rather than for eggs.  Progressive
farmers like the Perdues were soon breeding their chickens
for larger size, faster growth, and better conversion of
feed to meat$something no one had thought about when
chickens were grown only for egg production. As a result of
this specialization, the poultrymen were able to bring the
cost of chicken down far enough so that it became
affordable for everyone.

These changes literally transformed our eating habits.
In 1923, we Americans didn't consume a pound of broiler
chicken per person in a year; today we're eating about 70
pounds each per year.  And where once only the rich could
feature chicken for a holiday meal, now everyone can and
many do.

The holiday recipes that follow were developed by the
Perdue home economists.  You'll find them arranged by date,
beginning with January. I've included the sample menus that
accompanied the original recipes. My favorite among them is
the Fourth of July menu that comes from Frank's family.
CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION IS DO-IT-YOURSELF FEAST

I wonder if any nationality can compete with the
Chinese on the art of eating well.  The last Empress of
China, for instance, was known to order 200 dishes prepared
daily.  From these, she chose two for dinner.

Even average Chinese families, when they can afford
it, serve an array of dishes at meal time.  I remember
during one Chinese cooking course that I took, the teacher
explained the philosophy behind having several$or even
many$dishes at each meal.  The idea is that the taste buds
quickly tire of one taste-sensation and therefore, the meal
is more enjoyable if you have many flavors and textures.

At celebrations such as those that welcome the lunar
New Year, chicken plays an important role.  Chicken
represents renewal and rebirth, so it often appears in
several different dishes.  In China, the Oven Stuffer
Roaster included here would be served complete with head
and feet to symbolize completeness -- but my husband isn't
selling them that way right now, so I'm not going to be
completely authentic!  Other symbolic foods include oysters
to represent good fortune, fish to symbolize plenty, and
mein (noodles) to represent long life.

I don't really expect you to make all these dishes
from scratch, so how about getting some of them canned or
frozen from your supermarket?

CHINESE NEW YEAR FEAST
Cold Platter of Prepared Meat and Fish
(Abalone, Smoked Fish, Smoked Ham)
Boiled Rice
Oysters
Egg Rolls
Won Ton Soup
*Stir Fry in Noodle Basket
*Poached Soy Roaster
*New Year Low Mein
*Peking Cornish Hens with Scallion Sauce
*Stir-Fried Vegetables over Chow Mein Noodles
*Recipe follows
POACHED SOY ROASTERServes 8-10
1 whole roaster
10 cups water
3 cups dark soy sauce
1 cup dry sherry
2 tablespoons sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons five-spice powder
4 slices peeled, fresh gingerroot
Shredded cabbage (optional)
Carrot curls (optional)
Hot pepper flowers (optional)
Remove giblets; set aside.  Remove and discard fat from
cavity.  Tie legs together and fold wings back.
In 8-quart kettle or Dutch oven, place roaster, breast-side
down; add giblets and next 6 ingredients.  Over high heat,
bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low and cover; simmer 30
minutes.  Uncover and turn roaster over gently, being
careful not to tear skin.  Over high heat, return to a
boil; cover and simmer over low heat for another 30 minutes
or until leg joint moves easily and juices run clear with
no hint of pink when thigh is pierced.  Remove roaster and
cool slightly; cut into small pieces.  Serve hot, at room
temperature or chilled, arranging on a bed of cabbage and
garnishing with carrot curls and hot pepper flowers.  Soy
sauce mixture may be boiled and then passed as a dipping
sauce.
Note:  Sauce mixture can be used over and over again.  Skim
off fat; refrigerate up to a week or freeze several months.
Bring to a boil before reusing.
STIR-FRY IN A NOODLE BASKETServes 8-10
1 boneless roaster breast, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 4
cups)
6 tablespoons soy sauce, divided
2 tablespoons dry sherry
2 tablespoons cornstarch, divided
4 scallions, cut into 1/2-inch slices (3/4 cup)
2 teaspoons minced fresh gingerroot
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons Chinese sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
5 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
3 cups broccoli flowerets (1 small bunch), blanched
1 1/2 cups sliced carrots (about 3), blanched
3/4 cup sliced water chestnuts
1 can (8-ounces) straw mushrooms, drained, or 1 can (8-
ounces) whole button mushrooms, drained
1/2 cup dry roasted cashew nuts
NOODLE BASKET (recipe follows)
In large bowl, combine breast cubes, 2 tablespoons soy
sauce, sherry, and 1 tablespoon cornstarch; toss until well
mixed and set aside.  On small plate, combine scallions,
ginger and garlic; set aside.  In small bowl, mix well
remaining 4 tablespoons soy sauce, 1 tablespoon cornstarch,
vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, and Cayenne; set aside.
In a wok or large, heavy skillet over high heat, heat 3
tablespoons oil until hot, but not smoking.  Add breast
cubes and cook, stirring quickly and frequently (stir-fry),
3 minutes.  Remove breast cubes with slotted spoon.  Add
remaining 2 tablespoons oil to skillet and heat.  Add
onions, ginger and garlic; stir-fry about 30 seconds.  Add
broccoli, carrots, water chestnuts, mushrooms, and cooked
breast cubes; stir-fry 2 minutes longer.  Pour soy sauce
mixture into skillet and cook 1 minute longer or until
slightly thickened.  Stir in cashews.  Serve hot in noodle
basket.
Note:  Dish may be made up to 1-1/2 hours ahead, but do not
add cashews; add just before serving.  Place mixture in
oven-to-table serving dish; partially cover and reheat in
preheated 3250F oven for 20 minutes.  Or reheat in top of
double boiler over hot water for 15 minutes, stirring
occasionally.

PHOTO: Unusual presentation of chineese food in noodle
basket
NOODLE BASKET
1 package (8-ounces) spaghetti
Oil for deep frying
Cook spaghetti as package directs.  Run cooked spaghetti
under cold water; drain.  Gently toss spaghetti with a
little oil.  Over index fingers, fold five or six spaghetti
strands in half.  Drape folded spaghetti over edge of 7- x
3-1/2-inch sieve, so that loops fall to outside of sieve
and ends into center.  Continue to place folded spaghetti
(5 to 6 strands at a time) around edge of sieve.
Intertwine ends of spaghetti in center to form a woven
pattern that will make the noodle basket stronger and
prevent spaghetti from separating during frying.  Extra
spaghetti can be added in center of sieve to reinforce
pattern.  When basket is complete, place another sieve on
top to hold in place.
In large saucepan, pour enough oil to cover sieve; over
medium-high heat, heat to 375oF or until a small piece of
spaghetti sizzles and turns golden when placed in oil.
Submerge sieves, with spaghetti between, and deep-fry until
noodle basket is lightly browned; remove and drain on paper
towels.
Makes 1 large basket or 3 small baskets (4 x 2-1/4)
Note:  To make smaller baskets, drape spaghetti over a
sieve measuring 4 x 2-1/4-inches; repeat for 3 baskets.
NEW YEAR LO MEINServes 8-10
water
5 tablespoons soy sauce, divided
3 tablespoons cornstarch, divided
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets, cut into thin slices or
strips
2 teaspoons Chinese sesame oil
1 teaspoon sugar
5 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
1 cup chopped scallions (4-5)
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups sliced celery cabbage (1/4 medium head)
2 cups sliced celery (3 ribs)
2 cups carrots cut in julienne strips (3), blanched
2 cups sliced mushrooms (1/2 pound)
1 cup snow peas, trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 cups bean sprouts
3/4 cup sliced water chestnuts
3/4 cup bamboo shoots cut in julienne strips
1/2 pound fine egg noodles or thin spaghetti broken into
fourths, cooked, rinsed and drained
In medium-sized bowl, combine 2 tablespoons water, 2
tablespoons soy sauce and 1 tablespoon cornstarch.  Add
thigh pieces and toss until well coated; set aside.  In
small bowl, mix well 2/3 cup water, remaining 3 tablespoons
soy sauce, remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch, sesame oil,
and sugar; set aside.
In large skillet or wok over medium-high heat, heat 2
tablespoons oil until hot but not smoking.  Add thigh
mixture; stir-fry over high heat 3 minutes.  Remove thigh
meat with slotted spoon; set aside.  Heat remaining 3
tablespoons oil in skillet.  Add scallions and garlic;
stir-fry about 30 seconds.  Add celery cabbage, celery,
carrots, mushrooms, and snow peas; stir-fry over medium
heat 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender-crisp.  (Add
1-2 tablespoons water, if needed).  Add bean sprouts, water
chestnuts and bamboo shoots; stir-fry 2 minutes.  Stir in
thigh meat and spaghetti.  Add cornstarch mixture and cook
until  sauce has thickened.  Serve immediately.
PHOTO:  Create a meal in the Chinese tradition with fresh
Cornish hens Peking-style, served with stir-fried
vegetables
PEKING CORNISH HENS WITH SCALLION SAUCEServes 4
4 fresh Cornish game hens
6 cups water
1/4 cup honey
4-1/4-inch-thick slices fresh ginger
4 skewers (approximately 8-inches long)
Remove giblets.  Pat hens dry.  Bring water to a boil in
large saucepan.  When boiling, add honey and stir.  One at
a time, lower each bird into honey bath, quickly turning it
completely over to evenly coat with liquid.  Immediately
remove and place a slice of ginger in each bird.  Let hens
dry on metal rack for 10 minutes.  Place in roasting pan
with wings folded back.  Push tail into body cavity, then
run skewer through meaty part of drumsticks underneath
bone, skewering the tail.  (If wood skewers are used, cover
ends with foil to prevent burning.)  Cook in preheated
350F oven for 1 hour until tender.  Combine sauce
ingredients and serve with hens.
SCALLION SAUCE
1/2 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons dry sherry
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1 teaspoon grated orange rind
1 teaspoon sugar
2 scallions thinly sliced
Stir-frying is a classic Chinese cooking technique in which
food is quickly cooked over high heat to retain flavor and
crispness.  In a wok or skillet, saute chopped broccoli,
green beans, celery and bean sprouts in a small amount of
peanut oil for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
Flavor with soy sauce and serve.
STIR-FRIED VEGETABLESServes 4
1/2 cup bias-cut bite-size carrot pieces
1/2 cup broccoli flowerets
1/2 cup bias-cut green beans
1/2 cup celery thinly sliced at an angle
1/2 cup snow peas
2-3 tablespoons peanut oil
1 clove garlic peeled and lightly crushed (optional)
1-1/4-inch thick slice fresh ginger (optional)
Soy sauce to taste
In a saucepan bring 1 quart of water to a boil, add
carrots, and cook for 2 minutes.  Drain and rinse under
cold running water, then pat dry with paper towels.
To a heated wok or iron skillet add 2 tablespoons peanut
oil and optional garlic and ginger.  When oil is hot, add
well dried carrots and saute for 2 minutes.  Quickly remove
carrots with a slotted spoon and arrange on a serving
platter, then continue in the same manner cooking the
broccoli and green beans, each for 2 minutes and the celery
and snowpeas each for 1 minute.  Add more oil as necessary
and remove garlic and ginger if they start to burn.  When
all of the vegetables have been arranged, sprinkle lightly
with soy sauce and serve immediately.
ELEGANT DINNER FOR TWO
PHOTO CAPTION:  On Valentine's Day, show your loved one you
care by serving Cornish Hens Sheherezade and Tender-Hearts
Salad.

There's a hearts and Valentines connection today that
Great Grandmother never considered.  Given what we now know
about diet and heart disease, it's more true than ever that
the way to a man's heart really is through his stomach.

In the case of my husband, I think it's certainly true. To be
honest, Frank is not what you'd call a heavy duty romantic.  On
Valentines Day he does give me roses, but I've wondered if the flowers
appear because his secretary, Elaine Barnes, puts him up to it. I also
get a wonderfully romantic Valentine's card, but for all I know Elaine
may choose it for him.  In my heart of hearts, I think he enjoys
Valentine's Day, but is more turned on by the health aspect of the
menu that follows than with any flowers or valentines.

February has been celebrated as National Heart Month since
1962.  What better time than February to pamper a loved one's heart --
or your own -- than the season for lovers?  Here's a special February
14 dinner for your Valentine, one with an elegant menu for two that
encourages love, devotion and good health.

To star at the meal, serve Cornish Hens Sheherazade, a
romantic choice because fresh hens, like love birds, come
in pairs.  They also are low in calories, fat, cholesterol,
and sodium.  To surround the birds with beauty and good
nutrition, you could make a brown-rice pilaf, sweet-
flavored miniature vegetables, and a salad studded with
deep-red beets cut in tiny hearts.  For dessert?  Try
Forbidden Fruit Souffle.
MENU
*Cornish Hens Sheherazade
*Curried Brown Rice Pilaf
Miniature Vegetables
*Tender Hearts Salad
*Forbidden Fruit Souffle
*Recipe follows
CORNISH HENS SHEHERAZADEServes 2-4
2 fresh Cornish game hens
4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (reserve shell)
2 teaspoons soybean oil
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
Ground pepper to taste, and salt, if you must
Paprika to taste
2 small onions, halved
4 whole cloves
6 fresh or frozen baby carrots, lightly steamed
1/2 cup combined fresh or frozen baby peas and pearl
onions, lightly steamed
Curried Brown Rice Pilaf (recipe follows)
Place hens in large shallow bowl.  In small bowl, combine
lemon juice, oil, ginger, cumin, pepper, salt and paprika.
Pour into and over Cornish hens.  Cover and marinate in
refrigerator 30 minutes or longer.
Preheat oven to 350F.  Stick cloves into onion halves.
Place 2 onion halves and 1/4 squeezed lemon juice inside
each hen.  Tie legs together and fold back wings.  Sprinkle
with pepper and paprika.  Roast about 60 minutes or until
juices run clear with no trace of pink when thigh is
pierced.  Serve hens with vegetables and Curried Brown Rice
Pilaf.

CURRIED BROWN RICE PILAFServes 2
1 teaspoon soybean oil
1/3 cup chopped onion
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon ground turmeric
Ground pepper to taste, and salt, if you can't do without
it
Dash Cayenne
1/2 cup uncooked brown rice
1 tablespoon raisins (optional)
1 can (10-ounces) low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon snipped fresh or frozen chives
Preheat oven to 350F.  In small, non-stick skillet over
medium-low heat, heat oil.  Saute onion and spices and
salt, if you're using it, in hot oil for 2 to 3 minutes
until tender but not browned.  Stir in rice and raisins;
remove from heat and set aside.
In an ovenproof saucepan, over high heat, bring chicken
broth and water to a boil.  Stir in rice mixture; cover and
boil 5 minutes.  Place covered saucepan in oven and
continue to cook 45 to 50 minutes until rice is tender and
liquid has been absorbed.  To serve, toss pilaf with
chives.
TENDER HEARTS SALADServes 2
1 can (8-ounces) low-sodium fancy sliced beets
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon soybean oil
Ground pepper to taste
Pinch ground cinnamon to taste
2 small heads Bibb or Boston lettuce with outside leaves
removed
2 teaspoons snipped fresh or frozen chives
Drain beets, reserving 2 tablespoons liquid.  Using small
heart-shaped cookie cutter or cardboard pattern, cut hearts
out of beet slices.  Prepare dressing:  in small bowl,
combine reserved beet liquid, vinegar, and mustard.  Whisk
in oil in a slow stream; season with pepper and cinnamon.
Toss beets with dressing and set aside.
Trim base of lettuce heads, if necessary, so they sit flat;
gently spread leaves open like a flower.  Carefully wash
lettuce in cold water; pat dry with paper towels.  On each
of the two salad plates, place one lettuce head; arrange
beet hearts decoratively among leaves.  To serve, drizzle
with dressing and sprinkle with chives.
FORBIDDEN FRUIT SOUFFLEServes 2
2 large unblemished cooking/eating apples
1/2 lemon
1 cup unsweetened
applesauce
2 teaspoons honey
Ground cinnamon to taste
Ground nutmeg to taste
2 tablespoons applejack or Calvados, divided (optional)
1 large egg white
Confectioners' sugar
Preheat oven to 375F.  Lightly grease baking dish.  Wash
apples and, if necessary, cut a thin slice off bottom of
each apple to make it stand upright.  Cut a 1/2-inch slice
off tops of apples.  Using a small, sharp knife and a
grapefruit spoon, hollow out apples, leaving a shell 1/4-
inch thick.  Rub inside and top edges of apple shells with
lemon to keep them from discoloring.
In small, heavy-bottomed saucepan over low heat, combine
applesauce, honey, cinnamon, nutmeg and 1 to 2 teaspoons
applejack.  Cook, stirring often, until heated through but
not boiling.  In small bow, with mixer at high speed, beat
egg white until stiff but not dry.  Into medium-sized
mixing bowl, pour hot applesauce.  Add half the egg white;
fold in with a rubber or wooden spatula.  Add remaining egg
white and fold in gently.
Sprinkle inside of apple shells lightly with additional
cinnamon and nutmeg.  Place apple shells in prepared baking
dish; carefully fill with applesauce mixture, doming the
top.  Bake in center of oven for 15 to 17 minutes or until
souffles have risen and are very lightly browned on top.
Remove souffles from oven and sprinkle lightly with
confectioner's sugar.  To flame souffles, in small
saucepan, heat remaining applejack until barely warm.
Using a long match, light applejack and pour over souffles.
Serve at once.

 PHOTO - DRUMSTICK CROWN ROAST - SPRING
DRUMSTICK CROWN ROAST ADDS WHIMSY TO EASTER FEAST
The symbols of Easter are happy ones, full of the joy of
the day$spring flowers and spring greens, new clothes,
cuddly animals and their chocolate look-alikes, jelly
beans, fancy breads and cakes, colored eggs and Easter egg
hunts.  Catching the spirit of the day, Perdue Farms' home
economists  developed a playful main course to "crown" the
Easter meal.  It is a roast of drumsticks fashioned into an
edible crown by baking them upright around a coffee can.
When baking is complete, a corn bread stuffing that you
make replaces the can.  The technique is not difficult and
the can actually helps brown the outside of the chicken.
Pilaf-Stuffed Crown Roast With Herb Gravy could be the
centerpiece to a Greek feast, including a classic Greek
soup, artichoke casserole, and salad with feta cheese.
Traditional touches such as a garnish of red-dyed hard-
cooked eggs and luscious rich baklava from the bakery will
add authenticity to the celebration.  For an American-style
meal, serve Cornbread-Stuffed Crown Roast of Drumsticks
with Madeira Sauce.  Either way, Happy Easter!
MENU
Hot Sherried Consomme
*Pilaf-Stuffed Crown Roast of Drumsticks with Herb Gravy
or
*Cornbread-Stuffed Crown Roast of Drumsticks with Madeira
Sauce
Creamy Cole Slaw
Maple Candied Sweet Potatoes
Wilted Lettuce Salad
Golden Chiffon Cake
*Recipe follows
PILAF-STUFFED CROWN ROAST OFServes 4-6
DRUMSTICKS WITH HERB GRAVY
10 roaster drumsticks
1 empty coffee can (12-16-ounces) with ends removed and
outside greased
Kitchen twine
1/3 cup olive oil
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh oregano or 3/4 teaspoon
dried, divided
1 1/2 teaspoons minced, fresh thyme, or 3/4 teaspoon dried
1/4 cup flour
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups chicken broth or water
4 hard-cooked eggs, dyed red, optional garnish
Fresh bay leaves, thyme, oregano and marjoram, optional
garnish
GREEK EASTER PILAF (recipe follows)
Preheat oven to 375F.  Place coffee can in center of a
round 9- or 10-inch cake pan.  Arrange drumsticks around
can, narrow end up.  With twine, tie drumsticks securely
around the can in 3 places, starting at the middle, then
bottom, then top.  In a small bowl, combine oil with salt,
pepper, one half of oregano, and 1/2 of thyme; brush onto
drumsticks.  Roast drumsticks for 1 hour, 10 minutes,
basting halfway through cooking time with any remaining
oil.  Meanwhile, prepare Greek Easter Pilaf; keep warm.
Using two spatulas, remove roast with can to a warm 12-inch
platter or chop plate.  Pour 1/4 cup pan juices into a
small saucepan.  Whisk in flour and cook over medium heat
for 10 minutes, stirring constantly.  Add garlic, broth,
and remaining oregano and thyme; bring to a boil, whisking
constantly.  Season to taste with salt and pepper; strain
gravy into a warm sauceboat.
To serve roast, spoon stuffing into coffee can.  Carefully
lift off can and gently press drumsticks against stuffing.
Garnish, if desired, with dyed eggs and fresh herbs.
GREEK EASTER PILAF
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup pine nuts (pignoli)
1-1/2 cups converted rice
2-1/4 cups chicken broth or water
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup currants or raisins
1/4 cup minced, fresh parsley
In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter.  Saute onion,
pine nuts, and rice in hot butter for 10 minutes, stirring
constantly.  Stir in broth, salt, pepper, and currants and
bring to boil.  Cover pot with tightly-fitting lid; reduce
heat to low.  Cook rice 20 minutes or until tender.  Fluff
with a fork and toss with parsley.
CORNBREAD-STUFFED CROWN ROAST OF DRUMSTICKS Serves 6
WITH MADEIRA SAUCE
10 roaster drumsticks
1 empty coffee can (12-16-ounces) with both ends removed
and outside greased
Kitchen twine
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine melted
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1 teaspoon ground sage
Dixie Cornbread Stuffing (recipe follows)
1/4 cup  flour
2 tablespoons Madeira wine
2 cup chicken broth or water
Preheat oven to 375F.  Place coffee can in center of a
round 9- or 10-inch cake pan.  Arrange drumsticks around
can, narrow end up.  With twine, tie drumsticks securely
around the can in 3 places, starting at the middle, then
bottom, then top.  In a small bowl, combine butter with
salt, pepper, and sage; brush onto drumsticks.  Roast for 1
hour, 10 minutes, basting halfway through cooking time with
remaining any butter.  Meanwhile, prepare Dixie Cornbread
Stuffing, cover and bake in oven with roast during last 20
minutes of cooking time.
Using two spatulas, remove roast with can to a warm 12-inch
platter or chop plate.  Pour 1/4 cup pan juices into a
small saucepan.  Whisk in flour and cook over medium heat
10 minutes, stirring constantly.  Add Madeira and broth;
bring to a boil, whisking frequently.  Season to taste with
salt and pepper; strain gravy into a warm sauceboat.
To serve roast, spoon stuffing into coffee can.  Carefully
lift off can and gently press drumsticks against stuffing.
DIXIE CORNBREAD STUFFING
1/4 pound lean bacon, diced
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine
1/2 pound fresh spinach, kale, or collard greens, cooked,
well drained and chopped*
1 package (8-ounces) cornbread stuffing mix
1 cup chicken broth or water
Salt and ground pepper to taste
In a medium-sized ovenproof skillet, over medium heat,
saute bacon, onion, and celery for 5 to 10 minutes or until
bacon is cooked.  Add butter and heat until melted.  Stir
in greens, stuffing mix, and broth; toss well.  Season with
salt and pepper.
*Note:  Or substitute 1/2 package (10-ounces) frozen
chopped spinach, kale, or collard greens, thawed and
drained.

MOTHER'S DAY DINNER -- WITH LOVE FROM THE KIDS
Photo:  Chicken Bouquet is a centerpiece for Mother's Day.
Mother's Day became a national holiday in 1914.  Since
then, it's a day of love and memories, with no gifts more
appreciated than the "I made it myself" or "I cooked it
myself" variety.
     I remember so well the fledgling attempts by my oldest
child to cook for Mother's Day. Jose wasn't much more than
a toddler when he got the idea on his own to make hot cocoa
for a Mother's Day treat. While I was still in bed, he went
into the kitchen, turned on the electric stove, and started
to make the cocoa by setting a china cup full of water
directly on the hot burner. I came into the kitchen just in
time to prevent a disaster. As you can imagine, a quick
lesson on kitchen safety followed.
The Perdue Farms home economists want to be sure your kids
don't have a similar close call and recommend that all kids
be warned to stay away from the stove unless there's adult
supervision.  But assuming that there's an adult around to
help, children can participate in making a wonderful treat
for their mother.
The recipe that follows is "a dinner bouquet for Mom."
Grade school children and older can create a bouquet of
chicken kebobs, helping to thread fruit and fresh boneless
thigh meat on skewers and to "plant" them in rice.  For
younger children, even toddlers, Drumstick Blossoms are an
easy alternate recipe in which drumsticks are rolled in
Parmesan-flavored crumbs.  Any age child can help scrub
vegetables and spoon sherbet into orange cups.  Teenagers
can enjoy creating radish roses, making stir-fry rice, and
scalloping orange baskets to hold sherbet.
Editor's Note:  Please see accompanying recipes and
photograph.

Menu
*Citrus Chicken Bouquet
or
*Drumstick Blossoms
Stewed Tomatoes
Idaho Baked Potatoes with Sour Cream
Succotash
Dinner Rolls
Berries and Cream

*Recipe follows
CITRUS CHICKEN BOUQUET                     Serves 4
4 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
1/4 cup fresh orange juice
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon grated orange peel
2 cloves garlic, minced
1-1/2 teaspoon minced, fresh ginger or 1/2 teaspoon ground
2 medium-sized green peppers, cut into 1-inch squares
2 tangerines, peeled and pulled into sections
1 medium-sized clean, glazed ceramic flowerpot
Garden Fried Rice (see recipe) or 5 - 6 cups cooked rice
Cut chicken thighs into 1-inch chunks.  In shallow bowl or
non-metal container, combine orange juice, oil, soy sauce,
honey, orange peel, garlic, and ginger; mix well.  Cover
and marinate chicken for 1 hour or longer, refrigerated.
Drain chicken; reserve marinade.  Preheat broiler.  On each
of four to six 12-inch skewers, alternately thread chicken,
green pepper, and orange sections.  Broil kebabs, about 5
inches from heat, for 10 to 15 minutes or until chicken is
cooked through, turning occasionally and basting with
marinade.
To serve, spoon rice into flowerpot.  Stand skewers in
rice.
Makes about 4 servings
NOTE:  Kebabs can also be barbecued on an outdoor grill.
Cook over medium-hot coals for 10 to 15 minutes or until
cooked through, turning occasionally and basting with
marinade.
DRUMSTICK BLOSSOMSServes 4-6
Children can make this Mother's Day "bouquet" of
drumsticks. Served in a flowerpot it's whimsical and fun.
6 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup seasoned bread crumbs
1/4 cup sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon paprika
Salt and ground pepper to taste
12  drumsticks
1 medium-sized clean, glazed clay flowerpot
1 small head Boston lettuce or green leaf lettuce
parsley sprigs, optional
Preheat oven to 375oF.  Place butter in a baking dish.  On
wax paper, combine Parmesan cheese, bread crumbs, sesame
seeds, paprika, salt, and pepper.  Roll each drumstick in
melted butter, then in crumbs until well coated.  Arrange
drumsticks in same baking dish, alternating direction of
drums to accommodate all pieces.  Bake about 45 minutes or
until cooked through and golden brown.
To serve, separate lettuce into leaves; wash and dry.  Line
bottom and sides of flowerpot with lettuce, allowing leafy
edges to extend above rim of flowerpot.  Place drumsticks,
bone side down, on lettuce in flowerpot to resemble
flowers.  Garnish with parsley sprigs, if desired.


 FRANK PERDUE'S FOURTH OF JULY MENU
Frank has warm memories of his childhood, growing up on his
father's poultry farm on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. He
was part of the family business from the time he was so
small "he had to hold an egg with two hands."
Like any other farm family on Maryland's Eastern Shore, the
Perdues did not often get to enjoy a tender young broiler;
that was strictly springtime eating, when there were small
birds to spare.  The rest of the year, chicken dinner meant
long, slow cooking of one of the venerable hens that
hatched the eggs that were the family business.
"If a holiday came along," says Frank, "we could be sure my
mother's big cast iron kettle would come out and it would
be time to cook up one of the older hens.  That was great
eating!"
Here's the kind of Fourth of July menu that Frank grew up
with.  Since you probably don't have an old stewing hen,
try an Oven Stuffer Roaster for the Eastern Shore Chicken
with Slippery Dumplings.  Roasters are old enough to have a
lot of flavor, but young enough not to be too tough.
If you're unfamiliar with slippery dumplings, they are more
like noodles or won ton wrappers than conventional
dumplings.  Sweet Potato Biscuits are a typical
accompaniment, and Frank is so particular about them that
the first six months of our marriage, I probably tried ten
different recipes before hitting on the one that
accompanies the Eastern Shore Chicken recipe.  Sweet Potato
Biscuits are sweeter and chewier than the baking powder
variety eaten elsewhere.
Enjoy this Eastern Fourth of July feast.
Menu
*Eastern Shore Chicken with Slippery Dumplings
Turnip Greens
Corn on the Cob
Zucchini Parmesan
*Sweet Potato Biscuits
Iced Tea
Peach Cobbler
*Recipe follows
EASTERN SHORE CHICKEN WITH SLIPPERY DUMPLINGS Serves 6-8
Poached Roaster
1 whole roaster or 1 soup and stew hen
1/2 lemon
1 medium-sized yellow onion
2 whole cloves
Salt and ground pepper to taste
6 cups chicken broth or more if desired
Water
1 bay leaf
1 pound small white onions, peeled
1 pound carrots (about 6), peeled and cut into 1-1/2-inch
lengths

Rub roaster inside and out with lemon.  Cut onion in half
and stick with cloves; place in cavity of roaster.  Truss
bird by lacing up cavity and tying legs together.  Season
with salt and pepper, and place in an eight-quart Dutch
oven.  Pour in chicken broth and enough water to reach
halfway up sides of roaster; add bay leaf.  Place over
medium heat; bring liquid to a simmer.  Reduce heat to
medium-low.  Cover and simmer, allowing 20 minutes per
pound for a roaster and 40 minutes per pound for a hen.
(To keep meat tender, do not allow to boil.)  During last
45 minutes of cooking time, add onions and carrots.
Roaster is done if juices run clear with no hint of pink
when thickest part of thigh is pierced.  (Hen should be
cooked beyond this time to tenderize.)  Remove bird and
vegetables to serving platter and keep warm.
Add more broth or water to poaching liquid, if necessary,
to bring it halfway up sides of Dutch oven; bring to a
boil.  Meanwhile prepare dumplings.
Slippery Dumplings
2 cups  flour
1 cup warm water
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
In mixing bowl, combine flour, warm water and salt.  Turn
onto a well-floured surface and knead dough 4 to 5 minutes
until it becomes elastic; reflour board as necessary.  Roll
out kneaded dough as thinly as possible.  With sharp knife,
cut into 1-1/2 to 2-inch squares.  Add to boiling poaching
liquid and cook 5 to 7 minutes until "al dente."  Remove
dumplings to a serving bowl.
Over high heat, cook poaching liquid until reduced and
slightly thickened.  For a thicker gravy, add a small
amount of flour blended with cold water to poaching liquid.
To serve, pour some gravy over dumplings; pass the rest
separately.  Carve roaster and serve with vegetables,
dumplings and gravy.
Note:  You can substitute won ton skins for dumpling dough.
A typical side dishes for this dinner would be greens
sauteed with onion and a little salt pork.

SWEET POTATO BISCUITS                      Makes 12 to 15
This is how I cook sweet potato biscuits for Frank, with a
minimum of salt. You may prefer the biscuits with a little
more salt.
1 cup drained, canned sweet potatoes
1/4 cup syrup from canned sweet potatoes
2 tablespoons vegetable shortening
1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup  flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Preheat oven to 425F.  Grease a baking sheet.  Rice or
mash potatoes until smooth; place in small saucepan and
stir in syrup.  Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly,
until just warm.  Stir in shortening and sugar; mix well.
In a mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking powder and
salt.  Stir in sweet potato mixture; mix well with wooden
spoon or knead with hands for 1 minute.  On floured
surface, roll or pat out dough to 3/4-inch thickness.  With
1-1/2 to 2-inch round biscuit cutter, cut out dough.  Bake
12 to 15 minutes until golden on top and cooked through.
Serve warm.

SAY "BRAVO, CRISTOFORO COLOMBO" AND CELEBRATE ITALIAN STYLE

Columbus Day has been a national holiday in this
country since 1971.  Its first official celebration,
however, dates to 1792, the three hundredth anniversary of
the exploration that brought Columbus and a crew of 120
sailors to the New World.  The 1792 celebration took place
in New York City, where today's Italian-American population
equals the population of Genoa.

The first Columbus Day celebration included a gala
banquet$a thoroughly appropriate way to mark the event that
changed the eating habits of the Old World forever.  The
enriching exchange of foods between the Old and New World
affected all the cuisines of Europe, but none more than
that of Italy.  Imagine Italian cuisine without tomatoes or
peppers or corn.

To many of us "eating Italian" is a favorite
experience, and what could be a better excuse for a "festa
Italiana" than "Cristoforo Colombo Day".   Here's a
complete menu for just such a holiday dinner.  In fact, it
could be two dinners, because there's a choice of main
courses one with the color, spice and flare of southern
Italy, the other with the rich creaminess of the North.

Because large numbers of immigrants came from southern
Italy, especially from Naples and Sicily, lively southern
Italian dishes are most familiar to Americans.  These
typically include tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, spices such
as cinnamon, raisins, and olives.  Layered pastas and pizza
come from the South.

In the North, foods are lighter, more varied, and are
frequently delicate in flavor.  Many dishes call for
butter, cream or cheese, and filled pasta and rice are also
served.  Chicken is suited to either style of cooking, and
boneless Oven Stuffer Roaster thigh meat is as delicious
with a spicy tomato sauce as with wine and cream.  In all
parts of Italy, fresh vegetables, fruit, and herbs are
important.  Columbus' own city of Genoa is most closely
associated with the use of fresh basil.

Whether inspired by the North or the South, Columbus
Day is a time to wave the flags, both our red, white and
blue and the Italian red, white and green, and to salute
Christopher Columbus with a meal to remember.
REGIONAL ITALIAN COLUMBUS DAY MENU
Antipasto
*Brodo Genovese
*Chicken and Eggplant Agrodolce Siciliana
*"Rice Birds" Piedmontese in Wine and Cream Sauce
Broccoli Florets Parmigiano
Crusty Italian Bread
*Coppa Cristoforo Colombo
Cafe Espresso
*Recipe follows
BRODO GENOVESE:
CHICKEN BROTH WITH PASTA, CHEESE AND BASILServes 6-8
7 cups homemade chicken stock or 4 cans (13-3/4-ounces
each) chicken broth
1 cup small pasta such as tubetti (tiny tubes), farfalle
(bow ties) or conchiglie (shells)
1/4 cup minced fresh basil or Italian parsley
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

In large saucepan or Dutch oven over high heat, bring
chicken stock to a boil.  Add pasta and cook until tender,
stirring occasionally, about 8 to 10 minutes.  To serve,
ladle hot soup into bowls; sprinkle with basil and pass
grated cheese.

CHICKEN AND EGGPLANT AGRODOLCE SCICILIANAServes 6-8
1 large eggplant (about 1-1/2 pounds), cut into 1-1/2 inch
cubes
8 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
Salt and ground pepper to taste
1/2 - 3/4 cup olive oil, divided
2 cups sliced red onions
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar or red wine vinegar
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons honey
Grated rind of 2 oranges
1 can (16-ounces) whole plum tomatoes, drained and cut into
thin strips
Minced, fresh parsley and basil (optional)

Sprinkle eggplant with salt; let stand 30 minutes to
extract liquid; rinse and pat dry.  Trim off any fat from
thighs and cut into 2-inch pieces.

Preheat oven to 350oF.  In large heavy skillet over
medium heat, heat 2 tablespoons oil.  Add chicken, half at
a time; saute 2 to 3 minutes until lightly browned, adding
more oil if necessary.  Remove pieces with slotted spoon to
large, covered casserole or baking dish.   Add 2 to 4
tablespoons oil to skillet; stir in eggplant and cook 5
minutes until golden, adding more oil if necessary.  Add to
casserole.

Pour vinegar into skillet, scraping and stirring to
remove pan glaze; add garlic, cinnamon, honey orange rind,
and salt and pepper to taste.  Pour vinegar mixture into
casserole.  Cover and bake 15 minutes.  Stir in tomato
strips, re-cover and bake 15 minutes longer.  Garnish with
minced parsley and basil, if desired.  Serve with hot
crusty Italian bread.

PHOTO: Roaster Thigh "Rice Birds"
"RICE BIRDS" PIEDMONTESE IN WINE AND CREAM SAUCEServes 6-8
8 roaster boneless thigh cutlets
Salt and ground pepper to taste
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
2 tablespoons chopped onion
3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh rosemary or sage, or 1/4
teaspoon dried
2 ounces chopped prosciutto or ham
1 cup cooked rice
4 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup (2-ounces) grated or diced Italian fontina or
mozzarella  cheese
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chicken or beef broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
Trim off and discard any fat and sprinkle chicken with salt
and pepper.  Place between 2 moistened pieces of plastic
wrap; pound until about 1/4 inch thick.

In large heavy, oven-proof skillet over medium heat,
melt 2 tablespoons butter.  Add onion and 1/8 teaspoon
rosemary; cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes,
until tender but not brown.  Stir in prosciutto; cook 1
minute longer.

In small bowl, combine onion mixture, rice, and
cheeses; season with salt and pepper to taste.  Place 1
heaping tablespoon rice stuffing 1 inch from end of each
pounded thigh.  Roll up thighs into neat "packages",
folding edges in over stuffing; tie packages with kitchen
string.

In same skillet over medium heat, melt remaining
butter with oil.  Cook Rice Birds in butter-oil on all
sides until lightly browned, about 8 to 10 minutes.  Cover
skillet and simmer 35 minutes.  Transfer "birds" to serving
platter; cut strings and keep warm.

Add broth, wine, and remaining rosemary to skillet,
scraping bottom to incorporate any browned bits.  Stir in
cream; cook over medium-high heat until sauce is thick
enough to lightly coat the back of a spoon.  Return birds
and any juices to skillet; cover with sauce and cook
briefly just until heated through.

Arrange Rice Birds and sauce on serving platter and
sprinkle with parsley.
COPPA DA FESTA CRISTOFORO COLOMBOServes 8
Amarettini (small almond-flavored biscuits) or large
Amaretti, crushed
1 pint each strawberry, vanilla and pistachio ice cream
Amaretto liqueur (optional)
Colored candy sprinkles or nonpareils
16 cocktail toothpick flags of Italy and USA (8 each)

For each serving:  In bottom of large, stemmed glass,
place 1 teaspoon Amarettini biscuit.  Alternately scoop
strawberry, vanilla and pistachio ice cream on top,
sprinkling about 1 teaspoon Amarettini between each scoop.
Pour a little Amaretto or other liqueur on ice cream, if
desired.  Top with sprinkles and insert a flag of Italy and
USA.  Repeat with remaining ingredients.  Serve immediately
or place coppas in freezer until ready to serve.
PHOTO:  Chicken Kebabs are tailgate party heroes
PHOTO:  Thanksgiving Roaster Nested in Sage Dressing takes
an...

RECIPES OF OLD SOUTH ARE TODAY'S THANKSGIVING TREASURES
Even before George Washington declared Thanksgiving a
national holiday, its celebration had spread from
Massachusetts Colony to all America.  In the Old South,
Thanksgiving could mean weeks of preparation, days of
celebrating and a house that overflowed with guests.
Modern times have inevitably relaxed some standards of
southern hospitality, but not necessarily when it comes to
setting a sumptuous table.
Here's a Carolina version of a Thanksgiving bird.  It's an
Oven Stuffer Roaster complete with a nest of stuffing.  The
stuffing is cooked outside instead of inside, so it soaks
up the pan juices and develops a lightly crusted surface.
Several of Perdue Farms' home recipe testers tried the
stuffing-nest method and found it not only wonderful
eating, but an appealing presentation as well.
THANKSGIVING DAY DINNER DELIGHT
*Roaster Nested in Sage Dressing with Sweet Potato Puff
*Creamed Giblet Gravy
String Beans Almondine
Creamy Cole Slaw
Cranberry Salad
Sour Dough Dinner Rolls
Southern Pecan Pie
*Recipe follows
ROASTER NESTED IN SAGE DRESSING WITH SWEET POTATO PUFF
AND CREAMED GIBLET GRAVY                   Serves 6-8
1 whole roaster
Salt and ground pepper to taste
3 cups hot water
1 loaf (1-1/4 to 1/1-2 pounds) day-old white bread
1 cup chopped onion
1-1/2 cups chopped celery
1/4 cup minced, fresh parsley
1-1/2 tablespoons minced fresh sage or 1-1/4 teaspoons
dried sage
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
2 eggs
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
Creamed Giblet Gravy (recipe follows)
Preheat oven to 350F.  Remove giblets and sprinkle inside
of bird with salt and pepper.  Tie legs together and fold
wings back.  Place roaster in roasting pan or baking dish
along with giblets.  Pour in 2 cups hot water.  Roast 1-1/4
hours, basting occasionally with pan liquids.
Meanwhile, prepare dressing:  tear bread into 1/2-inch
pieces; place in large bowl with onion, celery, parsley,
3/4 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, sage, and thyme.
Mix well and set aside.  After 1-1/4 hours, remove roaster
from oven.
Reserve giblets and pour 2 cups of pan juices through
strainer into a medium-sized saucepan; reserve for gravy.
Add water to remaining pan juices, if necessary, to bring
liquid to 1-1/2 cups.  Ladle into bowl with dressing
mixture; add eggs and mix until thoroughly moistened.
With hands, mold stuffing around outside of roaster to form
a "nest."  Brush butter over breast.  Return roaster to
oven; continue cooking 45 minutes to 1 hour longer or until
dressing is cooked and lightly browned and juices run clear
with no hint of pink when roaster thigh is pierced.
If desired, serve nested roaster from roasting pan.  Or run
spatula under bird to loosen it and carefully transfer to
heated platter, keeping dressing intact.  Serve with
Creamed Giblet Gravy.
Creamed Giblet Gravy
2 cups reserved pan juices
Reserved roaster giblets, chopped
3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup  flour
Salt and ground pepper to taste
Chop giblets and add to pan juices; over medium heat, bring
to a simmer.  In small bowl, make a smooth paste of milk
and flour.  Whisk flour mixture into pan juices and
continue whisking until gravy is thickened.  Season with
salt and pepper to taste.
BOURBON SWEET POTATO PUFFServes 6
If you have a sweet tooth, you'll love this recipe. Frank
does.
6 medium-sized cooked sweet potatoes or 1 can (40-ounces)
sweet potatoes, drained
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter or margarine, melted
3 eggs
1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 to 2 teaspoons grated orange rind
1/4 cup bourbon
1 package (10-ounces) marshmallows
Preheat oven to 350F.  Butter a 1-1/2-quart souffle dish
or casserole.  Peel cooked sweet potatoes.  In large bowl,
combine potatoes with remaining ingredients except
marshmallows.  With electric mixer or food processor, beat
or process until fluffy.  Turn mixture into prepared dish
or casserole; arrange marshmallows over top.  Bake 20
minutes or until marshmallows are puffed and golden.
PHOTO:  Black & White - 3 Platters, 1 sm. bowl soup, 2
chopsticks
CHANUKAH IS A FESTIVAL OF FUN AND FOOD
Chanukah is a Jewish holiday, a day of remembrance, a
festival of lights, and most of all, a family party that is
celebrated during eight joyful days. Chanukah was first
celebrated more than 2,100 years ago, following the defeat
of the Syrian army by the Macabees.  After driving the
Syrians from Jerusalem, the Jewish temple was ceremonially
cleansed.  During the cleaning, a flask of oil belonging to
the high priest was found.  It contained enough oil to burn
one night.  Instead, it burned miraculously for eight days
and eight nights.  That is why a special eight-branch
menorah (candlestick) is lit each Chanukah night at
sundown, beginning with a single lighted candle on the
first night and building to a full eight.
As with all Jewish holidays, traditional foods are part of
the celebration.  Fried and sauteed dishes have special
Chanukah significance because of the oil used in cooking
them.  Holiday Chicken Saute is a favorite meal in one
family in which there are two small boys who still prefer
fingers to forks.  Their mother, who is a food consultant,
once asked Frank what he thought of such table manners.
His answer:  "That's why we sell our drumsticks with built-
in handles."
With most of America's Jewish settlers having come from
Eastern Europe, holiday foods served in that part of the
world are most popular here.  For Chanukah, this means
crisp, brown potato latkes (Yiddish for pancakes).  Latkes
are usually served with fresh applesauce and dairy sour
cream.  Before the arrival of the food processor, hand
grating the potatoes was a traditional pre-dinner part of
the ritual, with everyone taking turns at grating potatoes
-- and sometimes knuckles.
In Israel, fried jelly doughnuts are frequently served
instead of latkes, and many Sephardic Jews (from
Mediterranean countries), serve fried pastries unique to
each country.  Among them are Moroccan fichuelas.  These
crisp, honey-coated pastries are great fun to twirl in hot
oil and shape into pinwheels - but beware of the little
fingers near hot oil.
PHOTO: Chanukah for Families
FAMILY CHANUKAH SUPPER PARTY
*Holiday Chicken Saute
*Potato Latkes
*Applesauce
*Fichuelas De Chanukah
*Recipe follows
HOLIDAY CHICKEN SAUTEServes 4-6
6 chicken drumsticks
6 chicken thighs
2 tablespoons vegetable oil or chicken fat
3 small zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch slices
3 medium-sized carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch slices
1 large onion, sliced into rings
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons honey
1 lemon, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons cold water
In large, deep skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat,
heat oil.  Saute drumsticks and thighs in hot oil until
lightly browned on all sides, about 15 minutes.  Remove
from skillet.  To pan drippings, add zucchini, carrots, and
onion; saute 3 minutes.  Return chicken to skillet; Add
lemon juice, honey, lemon slices, salt, and paprika.
Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and cook 20 to 25 minutes
longer or until chicken and vegetables are tender.
In cup, place cornstarch; add water and blend to form a
smooth paste.  Stir into skillet and cook until slightly
thickened.  To serve, arrange chicken, lemon slices and
vegetables on large platter; spoon sauce on top.

POTATO LATKES (Potato Pancakes) Serves 4-6
5 medium-sized raw potatoes
1 medium-sized onion, peeled
2 eggs
1/4 cup matzo meal or  flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
Vegetable oil for frying
Wash potatoes; remove spots or blemishes with a small
knife.  Peel potatoes, if desired.  With hand grater or
food processor fitted with steel shredding blade, coarsely
grate potatoes.  Transfer to large bowl; cover with cold
water and let stand 10 minutes.  Drain potatoes in
colander, pressing out excess liquid.  Using hand grater or
food processor fitted with steel blade, grate or chop
onion.  Combine drained potatoes, onion, eggs, matzo meal
or flour and salt; mix well.  (As mixture stands, more
liquid will accumulate.  Do not pour off liquid; stir
mixture frequently to blend.)
In large skillet, heat 1/4-inch oil over medium heat until
hot.  Drop potato mixture by tablespoons into hot oil;
flatten slightly with spatula.  Cook pancakes, a few at a
time, until golden brown on both sides, turning once and
adding more oil if necessary.  Drain on paper towels.  Keep
cooked pancakes warm in preheated 200F oven while others
are cooking.  Serve pancakes warm, with applesauce.
APPLESAUCEServes 4-6
Frank loves this recipe.  He's normally not fond of Granny
Smith apples, but he likes them cooked, in this recipe.
5 to 6 medium-sized tart apples (about 2 pounds)
2 to 4 tablespoons water
1 to 2 tablespoons sugar, to taste (optional)
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
Peel apples, if desired; remove cores and seeds.  Cut
apples into chunks; place in medium-sized saucepan.  Add 2
tablespoons water, sugar if desired, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
Over medium heat, bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low;
cover and cook 20 to 30 minutes or until apples are very
tender, stirring occasionally and adding more water if
necessary.  Remove from heat and stir until large lumps
disappear and mixture is fairly smooth.  If apples are used
unpeeled, strain sauce in food press or mill to remove
skin.  Let stand until cool; refrigerate until ready to
serve.
FICHUELAS DE CHANUKAHServes 6
(Spiral-Shaped Sephardic Chanukah Pastries)
5 cups  flour
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
2 eggs, slightly beaten
2-1/4 cups vegetable oil, divided
3/4 cup warm water
1-1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup water
In large bowl or container of food processor, fitted with
steel blade, combine flour, salt, eggs, 1/4 cup oil, and
3/4 cup warm water.  Stir or process until mixture forms a
fairly stiff dough.  On unfloured surface, knead dough 5
minutes until smooth and elastic.  Divide dough into 4
parts; roll each into a ball and wrap in plastic wrap.  Let
dough stand 1 hour for easier handling.
On lightly floured surface, roll out one ball into a 9 x
18-inch rectangle.  Cut dough into 6 strips, each about 1-
1/2-inches wide and 18-inches long.
In small saucepan over low heat, heat sugar in water until
sugar is dissolved, stirring constantly; keep warm.  In
medium-sized saucepan over medium heat, heat 2 cups oil to
375F, or until small piece of dough sizzles when dropped
in oil.  With hand, gently lift one end of a dough strip;
pierce the opposite end with a long-handled fork and twirl
fork once to secure dough.  Place dough, fork-end first;
into hot oil.  As dough fries, quickly and gently turn
fork, rolling dough around to form a pinwheel.  Fry dough
until puffed and golden, about 30 to 60 seconds.  (Do not
brown.)  Slip dough off fork; remove from oil with slotted
spoon and immediately dip into warm sugar mixture to coat
well.  Cool completely on wire rack placed over waxed
paper.  Repeat with remaining dough.
Makes 24 pastries
FOR THE ROMANCE OF IT, SERVE A CHRISTMAS DINNER
GEORGE AND MARTHA WASHINGTON STYLE

        George and Martha Washington made much of
Christmas.  They had been married on the twelfth night of
Christmas in 1759, and from that year forward they tried to
be together for the holidays.  (The exceptions were such
occasions as Christmas 1776, when General Washington was
busy crossing the Delaware.)
    Two of the food specialists at Perdue are history buffs
as well, an they put together for Frank a Christmas menu
based on "receipts" (as recipes were once called) for
dishes that might have been enjoyed at Christmas dinner,
two hundred years ago.

As they pointed out, even basic food supplies were
very different two centuries ago.  American waters were so
abundant with crabs, oysters, shrimp and clams, that
inventive cooks tossed them into soups and spreads, baked
them "potted," "scalloped" or in loaves, and used them
lavishly in sauces and stuffings.  The oyster stuffing
included in this menu is based on a specialty of George
Washington's mother.  She may have served it with passenger
pigeon $common fare in those days.  Although this wild bird
is extinct today, Cornish game hens make tasty, tender,
modern substitutes.  And it is far easier to "bag a brace"
or two of Cornish hens at the local supermarket than to
stalk dinner in the wild.

Early Americans weren't partial to vegetables.  They
tended to overcook and under season them, then serve them
up as a "mess of pease".  But old-time cooks did make
wonderful vegetable puddings and were superb at pickling
and preserving their vegetables and fruits to serve all
winter long.

From the beginning, American settlers distilled
spirits.  Even the stern Pilgrims (who considered the
celebration of Christmas pagan) drank wine and cider for
their health.  After a festive holiday meal, most of our
founding fathers probably enjoyed a few rounds of Madeira
or Port.  But Thomas Jefferson's favorite holiday drink was
a spicy mixture of hot ale and rum, so heat producing it
was called "a yard of flannel".  Frothy syllabub was
thought to be suitable for everyone, even women and
children, and this rich drink was a delicious accompaniment
to sweetmeats, stewed fruit, cakes or pies.

Though few would wish to return to cooking at the
hearth and beehive oven, if you're smitten by the romance
of the past, try serving special guests a Christmas dinner
Martha Washington-style.

PHOTO: "An Early American holiday menu with Cornish hens"
An Early American Christmas Dinner for Four
Potted Crab
*Cornish Hens with Oyster Stuffing Mount Vernon
*Sherried Pan Gravy
Savory Grated-Carrot Christmas Pudding
Pickled Beet Salad
*"Whipt" Syllabub with Sweetmeats
*Recipe follows
CORNISH HENS WITH OYSTER STUFFING MOUNT VERNON AND SHERRIED
PAN GRAVYServes 4
4 fresh Cornish game hens
Salt and ground pepper to taste
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
6 oysters, shucked, coarsely chopped, and strained through
a fine sieve or coffee filter (reserve oyster liquor)
Pinch ground mace
3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh thyme or 1/4 teaspoon dried
1/4 cup chopped onion
2-3 slices day-old bread, cubed
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons dry sherry, divided
Spiced or brandied fruit for garnish (optional)

Preheat oven to 350oF.  Season hens inside and out
with salt and pepper.

In medium-sized skillet over medium heat, melt 2
tablespoons butter with 1/2 cup oyster liquor, mace and
thyme.  Add onion; cook 5 minutes until onion is tender and
liquid is reduced to about 1/3 cup.

In medium-sized bowl, toss onion mixture with oysters,
bread cubes, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, lemon
juice and 1 tablespoon sherry.

Spoon oyster stuffing loosely into hens.  Tie legs
together and fold back wings.

In a small saucepan, melt butter; combine with
remaining sherry and baste hens with mixture.  Roast hens,
basting occasionally, about 1 hour and 15 minutes longer or
until juices run clear with no hint of pink when thigh is
pierced.  Remove hens from roasting pan, cut strings, place
on serving platter and keep warm. Pour pan juices into a
heat proof measuring cup or small bowl.  Skim off 2
tablespoons of clear yellow drippings that rise to the top
and return to pan. Skim off any remaining yellow drippings
and discard. Reserve degreased pan juices to add to gravy
with broth.

If desired, serve hens garnished with spiced or
brandied fruit.  Serve with sherried gravy.
SHERRIED PAN GRAVY
2 tablespoons reserved pan drippings
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups chicken broth or water
4 tablespoons dry sherry
Place roasting pan over medium heat; add flour to reserved
clear pan drippings and cook 2 minutes, stirring and
scraping the bottom to incorporate any browned bits.  Stir
in enough combined degreased pan juices, chicken broth and
sherry to make 2 cups; simmer, stirring constantly, 2
minutes longer.  Strain gravy into sauceboat.
"WHIPT" SYLLABUBServes 4-6
3 tablespoons dark rum or Cognac
2 tablespoons sugar
Grated rind and juice of 1 lemon
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1 cup (1/2-pint) heavy cream
Sprigs fresh rosemary (optional)
Sweetmeats (see note) or stewed fruits

In large bowl, with mixer at medium speed, beat rum,
sugar and lemon rind.  Gradually add heavy cream, beating
constantly until cream forms soft peaks.  (Do not
overbeat.)  Cover and refrigerate until serving time.

When ready to serve, if liquids have separated, beat
by hand to re-incorporate.  Serve Syllabub in small cordial
glasses, garnished with a rosemary sprig.  Accompany with
sweetmeats. (By the way, do you know what a sweetmeat is?
It's any dainty little confection such as stuffed dates,
chocolate truffles, sugared apricots and pears, or even
candied watermelon rind.)





Chapter Nine
CHICKEN FOR VERY SPECIAL OCCASIONS
SHOW STOPPER RECIPES


With the majority of the recipes in this book, I've
tried to keep in mind that you are busy and have plenty of
other things to do with your time besides spending it in
the kitchen.  I've also tried to keep the ingredients and
the processes reasonably simple and usually I've had an eye
on the calories and the cost.

This chapter is an exception.  These recipes ignore
calories, and some of
them require not just minutes of preparation, but days.
There are some occasions, however, that deserve showstopper
recipes.  Maybe your daughter is getting married?  Or
you're celebrating a very special anniversary? Someone
important to you just got a promotion?  You're part of a
gourmet club, and you want your recipe to be at least as
good as Linda's?

This chapter is the place to look for unusual recipes,
the show stoppers, the ones that will really make people
feel special, and that they'll be talking about for days to
come.


BASS DRUM STICK                                  Serves 4-6
This really does look the padded stick a drummer would use
for his bass drum.
l. Remove the knobby knuckle from the end of a drumstick by
giving it a good hard whack with your heaviest knife.  If
you happen to have a meat cleaver the job is easier.
2. Stand the drumstick on its meaty end and push the skin
down to expose the tendons.  Remove the largest tendons by
pulling them free with a pair of clean pliers.
3. Scrape the skin and meat away from the bone to form a
rounder, more compact drumstick.
10 chicken drumsticks
1/3 cup flour
3/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 can (6-ounces) frozen orange juice concentrate
1 can (6-ounces) water
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
 3/4 teaspoon minced, fresh oregano or 1/4 teaspoon dried
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
In a large plastic bag combine flour, salt and pepper.  Add
chicken pieces and shake to coat.  In a large skillet over
medium heat, melt butter.  Add chicken pieces and brown on
all sides, 12 to 15 minutes.  Pour off remaining butter.
In a large measuring cup combine remaining ingredients.
Add orange juice mixture to skillet.  Cover and cook over
low heat for 25 to 35 minutes, turning chicken several
times until cooked through.

BREAST PAILLARD Serves 4
As you can see in the accompanying photograph, this is an
attractive dish.  I tried it on our indoor electric grill
and thought it was worth making over and over again.
1 roaster boneless breast or 1 thin sliced boneless roaster
breast
Vegetable oil
Salt and  ground pepper to taste
1/4 cup butter or margarine, at room temperature
2 tablespoons snipped fresh or frozen chives
1 teaspoon minced fresh tarragon, or 1/4 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
Remove tenderloin pieces from back of breast.  Place breast
pieces and tenderloins between sheets of plastic wrap and
pound to 1/4-inch thickness to form  6 cutlets.  Skip the
preceding steps if using the thin sliced roaster breast.
Brush with oil and season with salt and pepper.  Combine
butter, chives and tarragon.  Reform into a bar and freeze
to harden.  Grill cutlets over hot coals, rotating the
chicken on the grill to form crosshatch markings and
turning completely over once.  Or Broil 3" from heat a few
minutes on each side until lightly browned.  Cut herb
butter in slices.  Sprinkle each slice with parsley and top
with a butter slice.  Serve immediately.
BREAST ROLL CORDON BLEUServes 4
You can find a simpler version of this in Chapter Seven,
Chicken for Tomorrow or Next Week, but this one is a show
stopper.
1 roaster boneless breast
3/4 cup whole milk ricotta
 1 package (3 ounces) cream cheese, softened
1 egg yolk
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup  thinly sliced scallion
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
1 clove garlic, minced
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
Salt and  ground pepper to taste
1/4 pound sliced ham
3 to 4 cups chicken broth
Place breast halves side by side between two sheets of
plastic wrap and pound to 1/4" thickness, forming an 8" x
12" rectangle.  In a mixing bowl combine remaining
ingredients except ham and broth.  Place breast smooth side
down, on a piece of dampened cheesecloth.  Arrange ham
slices over chicken breast.  Spread filling over ham
leaving a 1/2-inch border.  Carefully roll breast,
lengthwise, jelly-roll fashion around filling.  Wrap in
cheesecloth, tie ends and in 2 to 3 places in center.
Bring broth to a boil in a large saucepan.  Add chicken and
reduce heat to low.  Poach chicken, covered, 35 minutes.
Remove from pan and let cool.  Remove cheesecloth and
chill.  Cut chicken roll in 3/4-inch slices and arrange
over lettuce or watercress.
CHICKEN BROCCOLI CAKEServes 4-6
From the name, you'd think this was a very unusual dessert,
but in fact, the cake part of the name comes from its
shape, not its taste.  Although this takes awhile to make,
especially the pancakes, I've always felt it was well worth
it every time I've made it.  Since you can eat this with
just a fork, it's particularly good for a buffet meal when
you don't want your guests to have to cut anything while
they're balancing food on their laps.
Sauce:
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups milk
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Blend in flour
and cook, stirring for 1 minute.  Add milk and cook,
stirring, until sauce is smooth and thickened.  Add salt,
pepper, and nutmeg.
Filling:
When choosing the broccoli for the filling, look for firm,
compact clusters of small flower buds with none opened
enough to show the bright yellow flower. If you can see any
yellow in the buds, the broccoli is overmature.  Broccoli
is at its best when the bud clusters are dark green or sage
green, or even green with a decidedly purplish cast.
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 cups broccoli, cooked and chopped (Once when I didn't
have enough broccoli on hand, I rounded it out with green
peas and it was great.)
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1-1/2 cups finely chopped cooked chicken
1/3 cup grated Swiss cheese
6 pancakes, each a little less than 7-inches wide and about
1/4-inch thick. (The thicker the pancake, the taller the
"cake".  Use your favorite recipe or mix.)
In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter.  Stir in
broccoli, Parmesan, salt, pepper, nutmeg and chicken.  (You
can stop at this point the night before, but remember to
bake the "cake" longer since the ingredients will be cold
from being in the refrigerator.)
Preheat oven to 375oF.
To assemble ``cake," butter a cookie sheet and place a
pancake on it.  Spread with part of the broccoli filling.
Repeat layers, ending with a pancake.  Pour sauce over the
top and sprinkle with Swiss cheese.  Bake for 15 minutes
(or 25 minutes if ingredients were refrigerated).  Place
under a hot broiler and broil until cheese is lightly
browned.  To serve, cut into wedges.
CHICKEN FONDUE IServes 4
I haven't seen anyone use a fondue pot for a long time, but
it's still a great way to serve chicken, and it's a fun and
informal way to entertain.  Maybe it's time to remember
this once-popular way of cooking. The first version is a
new, low-calorie version.  The second is more traditional.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
4 cans (13-3/4 ounces each) chicken broth
1 bottle (12-ounces) chili sauce
1/2 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
1/4 clove garlic, minced
Cut each breast in one-inch cubes. Sprinkle salt and pepper
on chicken.  Bring broth to boiling in fondue pot and keep
at that temperature.  Provide each guest with portion of
chicken and fondue fork as well as fork for eating. Each
guest cooks own chicken on fondue fork by holding in
boiling  broth about 1 minute, or until done. In a small
bowl mix remaining ingredients as sauce for dipping after
cooking.
CHICKEN FONDUE IIServes 4
4 skinless and boneless chicken breast halves
1-1/2 pints oil
1 1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
2 eggs, beaten
1 cup water
3 tablespoons sesame seed
1-1/2 cups flour
Cut chicken breasts into 1-inch cubes.  Bring oil to
boiling point in fondue pot and keep at that temperature.
Sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and the pepper on
chicken.  In a mixing bowl combine remaining salt, eggs,
water, remaining 2 teaspoons salt, sesame seed and flour to
make a batter.  Provide each guest with fondue fork as well
as fork for eating.  Each guest cooks own chicken on fondue
fork by dipping into batter and then holding in hot oil
approximately 1 minute, or until done.  Serve with a
variety of dips.  Any barbecue sauce makes a good dip.  I
also recommend the Dill Dip and Orange Dip.
DILL DIP                                       Makes 1 cup
1/2 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/2 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons finely chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon dill seed
In a small bowl combine all ingredients and stir until
blended.
ORANGE DIP                                      Makes 1 cup
1 can (6-ounces) orange juice concentrate
3 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon Tabasco
In a blender or food processor combine all ingredients.
Blend at speed for 5 seconds or until smooth.
Food Tip:  Use leftover orange or dill dip for fresh
vegetable such as cauliflower, broccoli, carrots or celery.
CHICKEN KIEV Serves 4
Frank and I had this in a restaurant in Moscow back in
1988.  We happened to be there because the Soviet
Government had invited Frank and his CEO, Don Mabe, to give
them tips on producing plumper chicken.  Don's wife, Flo,
and I got to go along. I remember that Frank was impressed
by the world-class knowledge and skill of the Soviet
poultrymen, but he said their chickens didn't grow to be as
plump and juicy as ours because their diets didn't include
enough protein.  The Soviet birds may have been thin, but
the recipe that we had for Chicken Kiev was "otlichnii,"
(outstanding).  You've got it exactly right if, when you
cut the cooked chicken, the  melted butter spurts out.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster        breast
1/2 cup butter or margarine, chilled
1 tablespoon lemon juice
 1 tablespoon snipped fresh or frozen chives
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 egg, beaten
1 cup bread crumbs
Oil for deep frying
Place chicken between sheets of plastic wrap and pound to
flatten slightly.   Skip the previous step if you are using
thin sliced boneless roaster breasts. In a food processor
fitted with a steel blade, blend butter, lemon juice and
chives; mold into four oblongs and chill.  (In fact, I
think freezing works best.)  Sprinkle salt and pepper on
chicken.  Wrap chicken breast around chilled mold and
secure with toothpicks.  Dip in beaten egg and roll in
bread crumbs.  Chill again for one hour.  Fry in deep fat
at 350oF for 10 to 15 minutes or until crust is golden
brown.  Serve immediately

CHICKEN PAELLA PERDUEServes 6-8
This is the Perdue version of the traditional paella.  The
authentic Spanish version takes all day to make -a I've
watched cooks in Spain do it.  You'll notice that the
saffron in this paella is optional.  That's because the
last time I looked at the price for it in the spice jars in
the supermarket, I calculated that saffron costs more than
gold dust.  However, you only need to use a couple of
strands of it at a time so it's not totally out of line.
If you can't find it or don't want to use it, this recipe
will still taste good$just different.  It will also look
different because saffron imparts an attractive yellow to
the rice.  Incidentally, the reason saffron costs so much
is that it's made from the dried stigma of the saffron
crocus and it takes 225,000 stigmas to make a pound of
saffron.
1 chicken, cut in serving pieces
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 small clove garlic, minced
8 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted, divided
2 cups quick-cooking rice, uncooked
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon seafood seasoning
2-3 filaments teaspoon saffron (optional)
1/2 cup fresh or 1 can (8-ounces) minced, soft shell clams
2 tablespoons clam juice
1 cup canned chicken broth
1/2 pound backfin crabmeat
1 cup peas
1 dozen small clams (on the half-shell)
1 package (9 ounces) frozen artichokes, cooked
1 jar (2 ounces) pimento strips
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Place chicken in single layer, skin
side up, in shallow baking dish; season with salt, pepper
and garlic.  Pour 4 tablespoons of the butter or margarine
over chicken; cover and bake for 45 minutes or until cooked
through, uncovering during last 20 minutes for browning.
While chicken is baking, in a large skillet over medium
heat, melt remaining butter.  Add the uncooked rice and
onions and saute until lightly browned.  Add paprika,
parsley, seafood seasoning, saffron, minced clams, clam
juice and chicken broth.  Simmer over very low heat for 15
minutes.  In the shallow baking dish, leave 2/3 of the
chicken; add the rice mixture, the crabmeat and peas in
layers.  As garnish, place on top of this, the remaining
chicken, all of the clams in the half-shell, cooked
artichokes and pimento.  Cover and bake at 350o for 10-15
minutes to heat through.

CHICKEN PICCATAServes 4
Frank's good friend, Sue Hess, from Ocean City, Maryland
is a busy lady who entertains frequently and likes to be
efficient when doing it.  As she puts it, "I don't like to
have to invent every part of the wheel all over again for
each party.  I use the same plan over and over again.  I
know which platters I'll use for hors d'oeuvres, I know
where I'm going to put the cocktail napkins, and when to
start peeling the corn.  When I find one recipe that I can
count on, I use it often enough and make it often enough so
I've got the preparation down to a science.  This Chicken
Piccata is one of my favorites to repeat for parties."
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster breast
1/4 cup  flour
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine
juice of 1 lemon
1/2 cup chicken  broth
4 lemon slices
1/4 cup minced, fresh parsley
Salt and ground pepper to taste
 Slice each breast in half lengthwise, butterfly-style. You
should end up with 8 thin, flat pieces.  Skip the previous
step if you are using thin sliced boneless roaster breasts.
Dip pieces in flour to coat lightly, shake off excess.  In
a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter.  Add
scaloppine and saute until lightly browned on both sides.
Add lemon juice and broth to pan and cook 3 to 4 minutes
more, turning scaloppine frequently in sauce until cooked
through.  Garnish with lemon slices and parsley.

CHINESE FRIED NOODLE CAKE WITH CHICKEN TOPPING
Theresa Kreinen, who developed many of the low fat, low
calorie recipes for Perdue, says that her favorite show
stopper recipe is this Chinese Noodle Cake recipe.  "I
remembered that many years ago when I was working for a
Chinese spice company, I saw a similar recipe and thought
that if I took the salt and fat out of the recipe and used
far less oil, that it might still be tasty."   She tried
her health-conscious version of the classical Chinese dish,
and ended up with something that is clearly a show stopper.
CHINESE FRIED NOODLE CAKEMakes 2 noodle cakes
In large sauce pot over high heat, bring 3 quarts of water
to a boil.  Add 6 ounces dried fine egg noodles; cook in
boiling water 3 minutes; drain.  Rinse with cold water;
drain well.  In large bowl, toss noodles with 2 teaspoons
vegetable oil to prevent sticking.  In 12-inch skillet over
medium-high heat, heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil.  Add
half noodles, flattening to form cake.  Cook 5 minutes or
until bottom is golden brown.  Loosen edges. Invert onto
large round platter.  Slide noodle cake back into skillet.
Cook 5 minutes longer or until second side is golden brown.
Invert onto large round platter. Repeat procedure with
remaining noodles.
CHICKEN TOPPINGMakes 6 servings
1 roaster boneless breast
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium onions, cut in thin wedges
2 tablespoons minced ginger root
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups torn spinach
1-1/2 cups chicken broth
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 sweet red pepper, cut in thin strips (1 cup)
1 can (8-ounces) bamboo shoots, drained and cut in julienne
strips
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/8 teaspoon crushed dried red pepper
2 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons dry sherry
Remove visible fat from breast meat and cut into thin
strips.  In a wok or large skillet, over medium-high heat,
heat oil.  Add onion, ginger and garlic; stir fry 1 minute.
Add chicken; stir fry 2 minutes, or until chicken turns
white.  Add spinach, broth, mushrooms, red pepper strips,
bamboo shoots, soy sauce and crushed red pepper.  Cook 5
minutes or until chicken and vegetables are tender,
stirring frequently.  In a cup, blend cornstarch and sherry
until smooth;  stir into wok.  Over medium heat, bring to a
boil; boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.  To serve, spoon
chicken mixture over Chinese Fried Noodle Cake.

FILLO WRAPPED CHICKEN
Deanna Doyel, a Californian, brought these to a pot luck at
my house, and since they were far and away the most popular
food at the party that night, I thought you might enjoy
knowing about them.  They're tender, flaky, delicious, and
they look good.  You might garnish the plate with some
parsley or watercress.  I've served them here to a
gathering of 50 of the Perdue marketing men and women, but
for variation, I cut the chicken into bite size pieces and
wrapped them individually to form cocktail-size morsels.
To make this successfully, be sure to keep the pastry
sheets from drying out or they'll get brittle and
impossible to fold.  Work with only one sheet at a time and
keep the others covered with a sheet of waxed paper and
topped with a damp tea towel.
WRAPPED CHICKENServes 6
1 cup mayonnaise
1 cup chopped scallions
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
3 cloves garlic, minced, divided
1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
Pinch salt
Pinch ground pepper
1 cup butter or margarine, divided
12 sheets fillo pastry (available in most quality
supermarkets)
6 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
Grated Parmesan cheese
In a shallow dish combine mayonnaise, scallions, parsley,
half of garlic, lemon juice, salt and pepper.  In a small
saucepan over medium heat melt butter with remaining
garlic.  Brush one pastry sheet with melted garlic butter,
top with second sheet and brush again. Dip chicken breast
in mixed ingredients turning to coat thoroughly.  Place
chicken diagonally on one corner of pastry sheets, then
roll while folding in sides to make a neat rectangular
package.  Brush top of wrapped chicken with butter and top
lightly with Parmesan cheese. Preheat oven to 350oF. Place
wrapped breasts in a baking dish and bake for about 35
minutes.  They're a golden brown when done.

MUSHROOM SNAILS                               Serves 4 as
an appetizer
This is one of the very few recipes that I've developed on
my own.  In spite of its name, it doesn't contain snails.
I'd eaten escargot (snails) in France, and thought they
were expensive and overrated, but loved the garlic butter
and other seasonings. One day it occurred to me that those
flavorings would be delicious with the mushrooms and
chicken livers that I happened to have in the refrigerator.
I sat down and wrote what I thought would be right, and
then made the recipe exactly according to the directions
that I'd written.  The verdict from guests was that these
mushroom snails are a showstopper, especially if you by any
chance have any of the escargot serving dishes with little
indentations for each snail.  Since I'm guessing that you
probably don't, I've suggested in the recipe that you serve
the mushroom "snails" on little rounds of sauteed French
bread.
1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
2 tablespoons snipped fresh or frozen chives
1/8 teaspoon salt or to taste
12 large mushroom caps
6 chicken livers, halved
Preheat oven to 400oF.  In a small bowl combine butter with
garlic, parsley, chives and salt. Fill each mushroom cap
with a half chicken liver.  Then, top each mushroom cap
with 1/12th of the butter mixture. Bake at until filling is
melted, and bubbly, about 8 minutes.  Serve on 1/2 inch
thick slices of French bread which have been sauteed in
butter until lightly browned.

OLD WORLD CORNISH HENS BAKED IN SALTServes 4
This is one of my personal favorites. When it's brought to
the table, this dish looks so impressive that I can still
remember the first time I saw it, which was  more than ten
years ago.  When the hostess brought the platter with the
four cornish hens, we couldn't be sure what we were
getting.  It looked like four chicken-shaped pieces of
white pottery in the exact shape of cornish game hens, only
a little larger. Our hostess explained that she had coated
the cornish hens with a half-inch layer of salt, and then
roasted the hens in this casing.  To serve the hens, she
took a small wooden mallet and gave each shell a sharp
whap.  Each time she did this, the shell would crack into
several pieces, revealing the fragrant and beautifully-
roasted game hen inside.  I thought the hens would taste
salty, but found instead some of the tenderest and most
succulent chicken you could hope for.
8 garlic cloves, unpeeled
1 bunch fresh rosemary or thyme, divided
4 fresh Cornish game hens (1 1/4 to 1 1/2 pounds each)
Ground pepper
4  18 x 18 inch squares heavy duty aluminum foil
2 boxes (48 ounces each) Kosher salt
2 1/2 to 3 cups water
Preheat oven to 400oF.  Place 2 garlic cloves and a sprig
of rosemary in the cavity of each hen.  Season with pepper.
Fold wings back and tie legs together.  Place a hen on each
sheet of foil.  Fold in edges of foil to form a nest with
sides 1 1/2 inches high.  Leave a border of 1 1/2 inches
between hen and foil.  Remove hens from nests and reserve.
Place nests on heavy baking sheets.  Fill each nest with
a layer of salt, 1/2 inch thick.  Return hens
to nests.  In a large bowl combine remaining salt with
enough water to make a heavy paste.  Use hands to mold salt
around each hen enclosing it completely in a layer of salt
approximately 1/2 inch thick.  Bake hens for 40 to 50
minutes depending upon their size.  To serve:  With a sharp
knife, carefully cut around the base of each hen following
its shape.  Use a spatula to gently lift salt covered hens
out of nests and onto platter.  Decorate platter with
sprigs of rosemary.  In front of your guests, crack salt
casings with a mallet and dust off any remaining salt.
Garnish hens with sprigs of rosemary.
Note: If you want to try this recipe with a 3 1/2 pound
chicken, proceed in the same manner as for the Cornish
hens, using 1 box (48 ounces) kosher salt and 1 1/2 cups
water. The cooking time would is approximately 1 hour and
15 minutes.

ORIENTAL COOK-OUT CHICKEN                   Serves 6-8 You
need an outdoor grill with a rotisserie for this one.  The
sight of the whole chickens wrapped in orange peel spirals,
turning on the spit is really impressive.  Don't let your
guests or family miss this part.
2 whole chickens
2 teaspoons salt or to taste
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup frozen orange juice concentrate (undiluted)
4 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
2 tablespoons French salad dressing
3 teaspoons soy sauce
2 oranges
Rub inside of chickens with salt and pepper.  In a bowl
combine orange juice, oil, salad dressing, and soy sauce;
rub mixture on chickens, inside and out.  Peel oranges,
spiral fashion, keeping skins in one strip.  Cut orange
segments into small pieces and place inside of chickens.
Truss chickens securely with string.  Place on outdoor
grill rotisserie rod, securing with forked holders.  Place
spiral orange peels around chickens, holding in place with
toothpicks.  Broil on rotisserie about 1 hour or until
juices run clear with no hint of pink when thigh is
pierced, basting constantly with sauce.
PERDUE A LA VERTICAL                             Serves 6-8
NOTE TO CONNIE; THERE'S A LINE DRAWING ILLUSTRATION OF
STUFFING THE BIRD IN THIS RECIPE AND ALSO ANOTHER DRAWING
THAT ILLUSTRATES CARVING.  WE HAVE PERMISSION TO USE IT
FROM SPANEK, AND THERE'S NO TRADE NAME ON IT.
One of the really fun things about being Mrs. Frank Perdue
is that people are always giving me tips on cooking
chicken.  Recently I met a woman in an airport in Puerto
Rico who told me that my life wasn't complete unless I
tried cooking chicken on a vertical roaster.  Not wanting
an incomplete life, I took her advice and found that yes,
vertical roasting really does have a lot going for it.  The
chicken cooks about 30% faster because the metal frame
conducts heat and is in contact with the bird's interior.
The bird is also juicier.  The heat of the vertical roaster
forces the juices outward while the heat of the oven is
forcing the juices inward.  The juices have no where to go,
so instead they just stay inside, tenderizing and flavoring
the meat. Vertical roasters are available in major
department stores as well as in quality gourmet cookware
shops.

Denis Spanek, who patented the first vertical roster,
says he's cooked at least 30,000 birds during
demonstrations and tests, and this is his favorite recipe.
It's now one of my all-time personal favorites too, but
I've felt leery about serving it to guests without knowing
ahead of time that they liked bleu cheese.  The last time I
made it, though, I found a way around the problem. I
stuffed one side of the roaster with the bleu cheese-
mushroom mixture and omitted the bleu cheese from the
stuffing for the other side.  Then I gave our guests the
choice of which side they'd like.
1 whole roaster
3 ounces crumbled bleu cheese
2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
3/4 cup Shittake mushrooms, if not available, use whatever
mushrooms are.
1 tablespoon dry white wine
1/4 teaspoon paprika
Place roaster on its back and use your fingertips to break
the skin membrane at the neck opening on each side of the
breast.  Work your fingers under the skin across both sides
of the breast and continue along the thighs and legs.  Be
careful not to break the skin that's attached at the center
of the breastbone. In a food processor fitter with steel
blade, combine blue cheese, garlic, butter and mushrooms.
Process, pulsating on and off, until mushrooms are coarsely
chopped and mixture just holds together.
Then, spoon the stuffing under the skin, working over the
breast, thigh, and leg areas, smoothing it evenly over each
side of the bird.  When the bird is stuffed, gently press
it onto the vertical roaster so the metal ring at the top
comes through.  Set the roaster in an 8-9 inch cake pan and
add 1/2 cup water to the roasting pan. Baste with a mixture
of  1 tablespoon of dry white wine with paprika.  This will
give a rosy color to the bird and the chicken will brown
beautifully. Sear for 15 minutes in a preheated 450 degree
oven.  Lower temperature to 350 degrees and cook for 15 to
18 minutes per pound
Food Tip: Carve the bird over rice so the rice catches the
drippings.

PHOTO:  Black & white -  chicken platter w/mozzarella
strips placed in lattice pattern over breast.  On ceramic
counter w/napkins, forks, cups & saucers, breads, etc.
ROASTER MARINARAServes 6
Frank is particularly fond of any recipe with tomatoes, and
usually we've found that in restaurants that if you see a
menu item that's "marinara," whatever-it-is is going to be
served with a tomato-based sauce.  However, according to
the New York Times food writer, Craig Claiborne, marinara
really means "marine style" or sailor style and marinara
sauces exist without tomatoes.  In this recipe, the sauce
is tomato based.  I'm fond of this recipe because it looks
so good.  Be sure and notice the illustration.
1 whole roaster
3/4 teaspoon minced fresh basil or 1/2 teaspoon dried
Salt and  ground pepper to taste
1-1/2 cups homemade or prepared marinara sauce (available
in supermarkets)
1 package (6-ounces) sliced mozzarella cheese
Preheat oven to 350F.  Remove giblets from roaster.
Season with basil, salt and pepper. Place bird, breast side
up, in roasting pan.  Brush marinara sauce over roaster 30
minutes before end of cooking time.  Cut mozzarella cheese
into long strips 1/2-inch wide and place in lattice pattern
over breast during final 10 minutes of cooking.
PHOTO:  STUFFED CHICKEN
STUFFED CHICKEN JARDINIEREServes 6
I don't know of many presentations that are more impressive
than this.  That's the good part.  The price for all this
impressiveness is that it's also one of the more time-
consuming recipes in this book. While it's true that there
is a fair amount of preparation required, the work is done
in advance and not at the last minute.  This recipe allows
you to surprise your guests with a chicken that appears
whole but slices into attractive pieces of chicken and
stuffing. It's  also a low calorie and healthy recipe.
You'll find directions for boning and re-forming a whole
chicken further on, but in case you don't have the time or
desire to do it yourself, a cooperative butcher can do it
for you in about five minutes.
1 whole chicken (3 1/2 to 4 pounds)
2-3 zucchini (3/4 pound), well scrubbed and grated
2-3 yellow squash (3/4 pound), well scrubbed and grated
4 carrots, peeled and grated
1 cup thinly sliced scallions
1 large clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced fresh tarragon or 2 teaspoons dried
1/3 cup grated Parmesan  or Romano cheese
1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs (made from 2 slices low-calorie
while grain bread)
1 egg white or 1 egg yolk, lightly beaten
3/4 teaspoon ground pepper, divided
1/2 teaspoon of salt, divided
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg or to taste
Yogurt-Herb Sauce (recipe follows)
Fresh tarragon sprigs, miniature zucchini, yellow squash
and carrots, (optional garnish)
Bone chicken except for wings and legs.  Using kitchen
string and a large darning needle, sew up any holes in skin
and the split area near tail -- chicken should form a
roughly rectangular shape.  Place squash and carrots in a
colander or strainer; press with back of wooden spoon or
hands to remove as much liquid as possible.
In a large, non-stick or lightly greased skillet, combine
grated vegetables, scallions and garlic.  Cook over low
heat, stirring frequently, 6 to 8 minutes or until mixture
is quite dry, but not brown.  Remove from heat; stir in
tarragon, Parmesan, bread crumbs, egg white, 1/2 teaspoon
pepper, 1/4 teaspoon salt and nutmeg.
Preheat oven to 400F.  Sprinkle inside of chicken with
remaining salt and pepper. Stuff and truss chicken,
following directions for reforming a whole chicken.  Brush
with oil, if desired.  Place on rack in roasting pan and
roast 20 minutes.  Reduce heat to 350F and roast 1 hour
longer or until juices run clear with no hint of pink when
thigh is pierced.
Refrigerate chicken until ready to serve.  Recipe can be
served hot, but will slice more easily if thoroughly
chilled.  Serve chicken with Yogurt-Herb Sauce, garnish
with herbs and vegetables, if desired.
Yogurt-Herb Sauce
1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
1 tablespoon minced fresh chives
1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
Salt and ground pepper to taste
In small bowl, combine yogurt and herbs.  Add salt and
ground pepper to taste.
BONING AND RE-FORMING A WHOLE CHICKEN
1. On a large cutting board, place bird breast down with
drumsticks turned toward you.  Using a small, sharp boning
knife, cut off tail.  Then cut through skin down middle of
backbone.
2. Keep knife close to backbone to loosen flesh, cutting
around small oyster-shaped piece of meat part-way down
back; leave oyster attached to skin.  Just below oyster,
use point of knife to locate and sever ball joint between
hip and thigh.
3. Working toward neck, loosen flesh from carcass.  When
shoulder blade is reached, keep bone to your right and cut
through joint to sever wing from shoulder.
4. Continue loosening flesh around edge of carcass until
you reach breastbone.  Do not try to detach this because
skin is very thin at this point.  Turn bird around so neck
faces you; repeat steps 2 and 3.  Carefully, cut through
two spots where wishbone is attached to carcass.
5. When both sides of carcass and wishbone are loosened,
lift carcass and cut breastbone away from meat.  Cut
through cartilage, but do not worry about leaving some
attached to flesh.  It can be removed more easily later
without piercing skin.  Remove carcass and, if desired,
simmer with vegetables to make a stock.
6. Using kitchen string or unwaxed dental floss, thread a
large darning needle.  Turn chicken skin-side up and sew
closed any holes in skin.  Stitch split area near tail
together so that chicken roughly forms a rectangle.
7. Turn chicken skin-side down and carefully remove any
remaining cartilage in breast area.  Detach small breast
fillets and use to cover less meaty areas near thighs.
Season meat, if desired.
8. Mound stuffing down center of breast.  Pull skin up on
either side around stuffing and re-form chicken.  Sew back
of bird closed.
9. Truss bird into attractive chicken shape.
A TRIO OF SHOW STOPPER "VEAL" CLASSICS
Chicken breasts, when pounded and flattened, can make an
excellent substitute for veal. And if your market has them,
the thin sliced boneless roaster breast  is even better,
since you don't have to pound or flatten the individual
pieces. The fact is, if someone didn't tell you, and if
you're not a food professional, there's a good chance that
you'd have difficulty telling the difference. The muscle
fibers in both meats are surprisingly similar; they're both
low in fat, and neither has much collagen, the factor that
makes meat fibrous and chewy.
The basic ingredients in most of the "veal" dishes that
follow are boneless, skinless chicken breasts. They're
called "cutlets."  A scaloppine is a cutlet sliced in half
lengthwise.
By the way, if Frank had his way, from now on you wouldn't
think of chicken breasts as an inexpensive substitute for
veal.  You'd think of veal as a more expensive substitute
for his chicken breasts.  In fact, Frank likes to say that
"Anything veal can do, my chicken breasts can do better,"
He points out that chicken breasts are richer than veal in
vitamin A, niacin, and calcium, and they're lower in
calories and cholesterol.  They're equal to veal in
protein, and of course, they're much, much more affordable.

If thin sliced boneless roaster breast is unavailable
in your market, you can make your own scaloppine, place a
skinless, boneless chicken breast half on a flat surface,
insert a sharp knife into the side and cut the chicken
breast into two wide flat slices.   Put these slices
between sheets of plastic wrap and pound with a meat mallet
or rolling pin to 1/4" thickness.

CHICKEN OSCARServes 4
Veal Oscar is served in some of the finest New York
restaurants.  You can make this chicken version  yourself
for a small fraction of the restaurant cost.
8 scaloppine (about 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken
breast halves) or 1 thin sliced boneless roaster breast
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 cup cooked crabmeat
16 cooked, fresh asparagus spears or 1 can (10 1/2 ounces),
drained
1 cup chicken broth
1 cup Hollandaise Sauce (optional)
Dip scaloppine in flour to coat lightly, shake off excess.
In a skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter.  Add
scaloppine and saute for about 1 1/2 minutes per side until
lightly browned and just cooked through.  Remove to serving
platter.  Top with crabmeat and asparagus spears.  Cover
and hold in 250 degree oven.  Add broth to skillet and cook
over high heat to reduce by half.  Stir frequently.  Remove
scaloppine from oven.  Top with sauce and Hollandaise, if
desired.

PERDUE PARMIGIANOServes 4
This is a little like the Austrian treatment of veal, but
with an Italian accent. Serve it with spaghetti. If you
don't have commercial bread crumbs handy, dry a couple of
slices of bread in a 250 degree oven, and then whirl in the
blender or food processor.  Presto! Your own bread crumbs.
8 scaloppine (about 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken
breast halves) or 1 thin         sliced boneless roaster
breast
1/4 cup flour seasoned with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/8
teaspoon Ground pepper
2 eggs
1/2 cup fine dry bread crumbs
6 tablespoons oil
1 cup homemade or prepared marinara sauce (available in
supermarkets)
1/2 pound mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Place seasoned flour on a sheet of wax paper.  Break eggs
into a shallow bowl and beat lightly.  Place bread crumbs
on a separate sheet of wax paper.  Dip scaloppine in flour
to coat lightly, shake off excess.  Dip in beaten egg, then
coat with bread crumbs. In large skillet over medium-high
heat, heat oil.  Add  saute scaloppine and saute for about
1 minute per side until golden brown.  Drain on paper
towels.  Arrange scaloppine in shallow baking dish or
casserole.  Cover with marinara sauce and mozzarella
cheese.  Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and bake in 350
degree oven for 15 minutes.
PERDUE WIENER SCHNITZELServes 4
I had the real thing in Austria, and I don't think it was
any better than this. Serve it with buttered noodles.
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or 1 thin sliced
boneless roaster breast
1/4 cup flour seasoned with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/8
teaspoon         Ground pepper
6 eggs
1 cup fine bread crumbs
6 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
1 lemon, quartered
Pound chicken between plastic wrap to flatten to 1/4 inch
thickness. Skip the previous step if you are using thin
sliced boneless roaster breasts. Break 2 eggs into a
shallow bowl and beat lightly.  Place bread crumbs on a
separate sheet of wax paper. Dip cutlets in flour to coat,
shake off excess.  Dip in beaten eggs, then coat with bread
crumbs. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt half
of butter. Saute breaded cutlets until golden brown and
cooked through, about 5 minutes.  Remove to heated serving
platter. Add reserved butter to skillet and fry remaining
eggs sunnyside up to desired doneness. Season with salt and
pepper. Place 1 egg on top of each cutlet, sprinkle with
parsley and garnish with lemon quarters.
NOTE TO EDITOR: CAN WE HAVE THE SECTION ON "MENU FOR THREE
BEAUTIFUL GUESTS" PUT ON ITS OWN PAGE, SEPARATE FROM THE
OTHER RECIPES?  I'D LIKE TO HAVE IT HIGHLIGHTED IN SOME
MANNER.
LET'S USE THE STORY BOARD FOR THREE BEAUTIFUL GUESTS HERE.
MOST OF THE READERS WILL NEVER HAVE SEEN A STORY BOARD
BEFORE AND WOULD FIND IT FASCINATING.
PHOTO: POSSIBLE PHOTO OF THE FOUR CORNISH, IF WE CAN FIND
IT IN COLOR.
MENU FOR THREE BEAUTIFUL GUESTS
One of Frank's most memorable commercials is "Dinner with
Three Beautiful Guests."
In the commercial, while Frank roasts four fresh Cornish
game hens, he showers; shaves; puts on a tuxedo; chills
some champagne; arranges flowers in a vase; turns on soft
music; and then opens the door to greet three ravishing
beauties.  The commercial has been so successful that the
advertising agency produced a sequel, dramatizing an actual
letter that arrived at Perdue Farms' consumer relations
department:

"Mr. Perdue, I have a complaint.  I prepared four of
your Cornish hens just as you did on T.V.  I showered and
shaved just as you did on T.V.  I dressed as you did on
T.V.  I chilled the wine, and laid the birds on a bed of
wild rice just as you did on T.V.  Your advertising is
misleading.  No pretty girls have knocked on my door."
People sometimes ask me if the original ad makes me
jealous. Actually it's my favorite.
QUICK, CRISP CORNISH HENSServes 4
Wild rice is a completely different crop from regular rice.
It is chewier and has a more nut-like flavor.  The people
who grow it refer to it as "the caviar of grains."
This is a good and quick method for roasting Cornish hens
but it can smoke up your kitchen. If you don't have a good
fan, preheat your oven to 500oF and then reduce it to 375oF
when you put the hens in - and then roast them for 45 to 50
minutes instead of the half hour mentioned in this recipe.
4 fresh Cornish game hens
Salt and  ground pepper to taste
1 tablespoon minced, fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried
1 bunch fresh parsley
4 small bay leaves
1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted
2 cups hot, cooked wild rice
1 lemon cut in wedges as garnish
Bacon and Wild Mushroom Gravy (recipe follows)
Place rack in lower half of oven; preheat to 5000F. If you
have a ventilator fan on stove, turn it on.  Reserving
other giblets for gravy, discard necks and livers.  Season
hen cavities with salt, pepper and thyme.  Trim stem ends
from parsley and add 1 tablespoon to each cavity, along
with a bay leaf.  Tie legs together, fold back wings and
place hens breast side up in a roasting pan.
Roast hens for about 30 minutes, basting once with butter,
until skin is brown and crisp and juices run clear with no
hint of pink when thigh is pierced.  Remove hens from pan
and skim off all but 3 tablespoons drippings to be used in
gravy.  Serve on a bed of wild rice; garnish with parsley
and lemon wedges and pass gravy separately.
Bacon and Wild Mushroom Gravy
1 ounce dried wild mushrooms (cepes, morels or porcini)
1 cup boiling water
1/4 pound bacon, diced
Giblets reserved from hens, chopped
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup dry sherry
1/4 cup flour
2-1/2 cups chicken broth or water
To reconstitute mushrooms  well, pour boiling water over
them and allow to steep 10 minutes.  Strain through a
coffee filter and reserve liquid.  Rinse mushrooms to
remove any sand; chop finely.
In a large skillet over medium-low heat, fry bacon until
crisp.  Drain bacon on paper towels.  Leaving 2 tablespoons
bacon fat in pan, add giblets, mushrooms and onion and
brown about 5 minutes.  Add to Cornish drippings in
roasting pan.  Whisk in sherry and flour.  Cook, whisking
frequently for 3 to 4 minutes or until flour is browned.
Add bacon, reserved mushroom liquid, and broth to flour
mixture.  Bring to a boil, whisking frequently, and cook
gravy to thicken.  Serve with hens.
CIDER-GLAZED CARROTSServes 4
1 pound baby carrots, peeled
2 cups apple cider
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons honey
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 tablespoon minced, fresh parsley
Cut larger carrots in half on a diagonal, if necessary, so
that all carrots are approximately the same size.  In a
saucepan over medium heat, bring cider, butter, honey, salt
and pepper to a boil and add carrots.  Cook 5 minutes or
until just beginning to soften; remove with slotted spoon.
Bring cider mixture back to a boil and cook 5 minutes to
thicken glaze.  Remove from heat.  Two minutes before
serving, reheat carrots in sauce, tossing frequently.
Serve garnished with parsley.
PEAS IN CHIVE CREAMServes 4
1 cup heavy cream
1/2 teaspoon salt and ground pepper to taste
1 1/2 to 2 cups fresh or frozen peas
1 tablespoon snipped  fresh or frozen chives
In a saucepan over medium-high heat, bring cream and
seasoning to a boil and cook until thick, about 5 minutes;
whisk frequently.  Five minutes before serving, stir in
peas and bring back to a boil, stirring frequently.  Add
chives just before serving.
STRAWBERRIES ROMANOFFServes 4
1 quart long-stemmed strawberries
1 cup sour cream
1/2 to 1 cup brown sugar, sifted
Arrange strawberries attractively on four individual
dessert plates.  Garnish each plate with a big dollop of
sour cream and a heaping tablespoonful of sugar.  Dip
strawberries first into sour cream, then into sugar.
ZURELLI'S SPINACH CUTLETS
Chuck Zurelli, a butcher for one of the large supermarket
chains,  makes this for his customers.  It's not hard to do
at home and it looks professional.  You may want to
substitute fresh minced onion and garlic for the onion
powder and garlic powder that Mr. Zurelli uses.
There is a trick to it though.  We all know that having
sharp knives is a Good Thing, but how often do you sharpen
yours?  Are you like me, that once a year would be average,
and if you were to get up to once a month, you'd be feeling
pretty virtuous?  Chuck Zurelli does a little better than
once a month.  If you were to watch him at work, you'd see
that in the process of butterflying chicken breasts, he'll
almost automatically run his knife across his sharpening
tool every 15 or 20 seconds. Since meeting Mr. Zurelli,
I've asked other butchers how often they sharpen their
knives.  It turns out that Zurelli is typical.  The
professionals feel it's worth their while to keep their
knives very, very sharp.  Now that I've tried it, I think
they're right. If you're doing some serious cutting, how
about a few quick strokes on your sharpening tool? It does
make a difference.
For each serving:
1 skinless, boneless chicken breast half or 1 slice of the
thin sliced boneless             roaster breast
4 spinach leaves
1 slice provolone cheese
Onion powder
Garlic powder
Vegetable oil
Salt and ground pepper to taste
Take a half boneless chicken breast and butterfly it open.
Or use a slice of the thin sliced roaster breast. Remove
the membrane and sinews, since these can tighten unevenly
and distort the look of the final product. Take four
spinach leaves and layer these over the butterflied fillet.
Top this with a slice of provolone cheese, cut about as
thick as the pre-sliced cheeses used for sandwiches. Season
with a few shakes each of onion powder and garlic powder.
(Don't add salt until after it's finished cooking; salt
will draw out the juices and toughen the meat.)  Roll up
the fillet tightly, jelly roll fashion.  Fasten with a
toothpick or tie with kitchen twine. Preheat oven to 350oF.
Brush chicken with oil to seal in the moisture and then
bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until cooked through.  Season
with salt and pepper.













CHAPTER TEN
CHICKEN PLANNED-OVERS $ A GREAT FAST FOOD

Everyone is so busy nowadays, it's often tempting to
pick up dinner at a fast food carry-out on the way home.
The problem is, these foods not only dent the budget, they
can short-change you nutritionally.  Often they're high in
the fat or sodium which many of us are trying to limit.

There are, however, ways to serve speedy meals that
are also good for you. In fact, I like to think of leftover
chicken as a fast food.  It gives you a head start on so
many recipes.

Michelle Evans, the eminent cookbook author and travel
authority, likes to say that left over chicken is the
"basic black dress" of the culinary world.  It's true.  You
can dress it up in so many ways: you can use herbs and
spices, sauces and dips, toppings and crusts.  Just as a
basic black dress is handy to have around, so leftover
chicken is wonderful for a fast start on a number of
delicious dishes.

By using leftovers, you can create fast food  while
maintaining control over the calories and nutrition.  When
you do cook, plan for leftovers by preparing extra
quantities.  Serve part of what you prepared immediately,
and save the rest for a "planover".  Then, on those days
when you're short on time,
use your microwave to create a meal from your store of
"planovers."

There are a few points to keep in mind when using
leftovers.

_Know how long the food has been held at room
temperature.  The Department of Agriculture recommends that
you throw food out if it's of animal origin and if it's
been left unrefrigerated for more than two hours.  I've
talked with some food scientists, however, who feel that
the USDA two-hour rule is unnecessarily strict. They say
that except for the at-risk groups, (infants, the elderly
or those in poor health), that you can probably still use
chicken that has been kept at room temperature for a little
longer than two hours, maybe as long as four hours.  Still,
they agree that the longer chicken is kept at room
temperature, the bigger the chance you're taking. Harmful
organisms can multiply rapidly on food that's held in the
danger zone between 40 degrees and 140 degrees.
Personally, I'm in favor of being cautious, but I thought
you might like to know that there's more than one view.

_When refrigerating leftovers, break them down into
shallow pans that aren't deeper than a couple of inches.
If you have a deep pan with lots of, for example, leftover
stuffing, it could take too long for the food in the middle
to cool down to 40 degrees.

_If you're not going to eat the leftover chicken
within three days, freeze it.

_Don't store cooked chicken in the freezer for longer
than three months.  Label it so you can keep track of it.
A California home economist friend of mine keeps a running
log of what's in her freezer, marking dishes when they are
removed.  This reduces the search time with the freezer
open, and keeps her from losing track of what's in there.

_Wrap leftovers tightly in moisture proof wrapping so
as to prevent freezer burn.

_Think of ways of working leftovers into your brown
bag lunches.  Cold chicken makes a great lunch.  Chicken
soup or stew goes great in a thermos.
If you happen to be browsing in this chapter and find you
want to make one of the recipes but don't have any
leftovers handy, you can make some by:

1. Baking a chicken. Place whole chicken without any
seasonings or coatings, uncovered in a 350oF oven for
approximately 1 hour.

2. Simmering a whole chicken

        1 chicken

2 cups water

        1 teaspoon salt or to taste

        1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

1 onion, peeled and quartered

1 stalk celery, halved

1 bay leaf

        Put chicken in kettle or sauce pan.  Add water
and remaining ingredients.  Cover and simmer 45 minutes or
until cooked through. Save the broth for sauces or soup
bases.

3. Simmering parts of a chicken using the same recipe
as for whole chicken. Boneless parts cook fastest, a small
breast in 15 minutes, a larger roaster-size one in 20 to
25, and boneless roaster thighs in 30 to 40 minutes.

PHOTO:  3 pies and 1 oblong casserole
CHICKEN POTPIES REDISCOVERED
One of the best uses for leftover chicken is chicken pot
pies.
Back in the days of the Roman empire, potpies were banquet
fare, often created with surprises - even live birds --
under the crust.  During the time of Elizabeth I, English
cooks made potpies using "chicken peepers," tiny chicks
stuffed with gooseberries.  By the mid-eighteenth century,
an English cookbook included a sort of telescoping pie in
which five birds were stuffed one inside another, then
wrapped in dough.

With a past like that, it is not surprising that
immigrants to America brought an appreciation for potpies
with them.  When settlers moved West, so did their potpie
recipes, which they adapted to local food styles with new
ingredients and seasonings.  By this century, chicken
potpies and "meat and taters" variations had become as
American as corn on the cob.  They were thrifty foods,
served at the kitchen table and in "home cooking" diners
along country roads.

Recently, nostalgia for homespun cookery has meant a
change in status for potpies.  They not only are considered
respectable, they're even "trendy," often appearing on the
menus of fashionable restaurants.  These are perfect
recipes in which to use leftover chicken, and if you run
short of a particular vegetable go ahead and substitute
whatever else looks good. In fact, you can mix and match
and change the ingredients, flavorings and toppings to suit
the mood of the moment.  To get you started, here are a few
guidelines.
Tips for Making old-Fashioned Chicken Potpies

_Potpie fillings are actually stews or creamed dishes
inside a crust.  If you want you can also serve fillings
over rice, noodles, toast points or party shells.

_To prevent a soggy bottom crust, bake two-crust pies
on the bottom shelf of a preheated oven and slit the top to
allow steam to escape.  For decorative slits, use a
favorite hors d'oeuvre or cookie cutter.  Also space
dumplings, biscuits and other toppings to allow for
steaming.

_When making individual potpies, eliminating the
bottom crust creates a better proportion of filling to
pastry.  One double-crust recipe for a 9-inch pie plate
makes about 8 single-crust, 5-inch tarts.  Reduce baking
time by 10 minutes.

_For a different flavor in biscuits, crusts or potato
toppings, crumble in a few tablespoonfuls of herbs or
grated cheese.

_Potpie fillings can be prepared in advance and
refrigerated, but do not pour fillings into pastry shells
until ready to bake.  If you plan to freeze a pie for
storage, eliminate the bottom crust, sealing the top one
over cooked filling.  Place in a plastic bag or wrap
tightly with heavy foil.  Do not defrost before baking.
Preheat the oven and add 15 minutes to cooking time.
CAJUN PIEServes 4
1/4 pound lean bacon
Vegetable oil
3 tablespoons  flour
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup fresh ripe or canned chopped tomatoes
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
4 to 12 drops Tabasco
1-1/4 cups water
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 package (10 ounces) frozen succotash, thawed
2 cups cooked, chopped chicken
8 to 10 ready to bake buttermilk biscuits
Grease a deep 9-inch pie plate or ovenproof dish.  In
large, heavy skillet, over medium-high heat, cook bacon
until crisp.  Remove bacon with a slotted spoon to drain;
crumble.  Pour drippings into a measuring cup and add oil
to bring to 1/2 cup.  Return to skillet and stir in flour.
Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, for 5 to 10
minutes or until well browned.  Add onions and cook 1
minute.  Stir in green peppers, tomatoes, sauces, and
water; season to taste with salt.  Simmer until slightly
thickened or about 1 to 3 minutes; stir in succotash bacon
and chicken.  Pour into prepared dish.  Preheat oven to
425oF.  Place biscuits on top of filling with edges
touching.  Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until filling is
hot and biscuits are golden brown.
CHICKEN HASH PIEServes 4
2 pounds (4 large) potatoes, peeled and diced
1 cup (1/2 pint) heavy cream, divided
6 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
Salt and ground pepper to taste
Pinch ground nutmeg
1 cup  thinly sliced scallions, white and tender green
parts only
1/2 cup chopped celery
2 tablespoons  flour
1 cup chicken broth
3 cups cooked, chopped chicken
 3/4 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or 1/4 teaspoon dried
4 eggs
2 teaspoons minced, fresh parsley, optional
Preheat oven to 350F.  Grease a 9-inch pie plate or 1-1/2-
quart ovenproof casserole.  Place potatoes in a large
saucepan with enough water to cover.  Salt to taste.  Bring
to a boil over high heat.  Reduce heat to low and cook
until tender, about 15 minutes.  Drain and mash potatoes,
adding 1/4 cup cream, 2 tablespoons butter, 1/4 teaspoon
pepper, nutmeg, and salt to taste.  Cover and set aside.
In large skillet over medium-high heat, melt remaining
butter.  Saute scallions and celery in butter for 3
minutes.  Whisk in flour and cook 3 minutes.  Add broth and
remaining 3/4 cup cream and heat to boiling, whisking
constantly.  Stir in chicken, thyme, 1 teaspoon salt or to
taste, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper.
Spread chicken mixture on bottom of prepared pie plate.
Pipe 4 potatoes rings on top of pie or spread potatoes over
filling and make four depressions with the back of a spoon.
Bake 15 minutes.  Remove from oven and carefully break eggs
into rings or depressions.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper,
if desired, and return to oven for 15 minutes or until eggs
are set to desired doneness.  Garnish with parsley and
serve immediately.
CHICKEN PIEServes 4
In contrast to the recipe above for Chicken Hash Pie, this
may be one of the easiest chicken pie recipes there is.
Sprinkle grated Cheddar cheese over the biscuits when you
want something different.
2 cups cooked chicken, cut in chunks
2 cans (10-1/2-ounces each) cream of mushroom soup,
undiluted
1/2 cup uncooked frozen peas
2 raw carrots, sliced
2 tablespoons finely chopped onion or 1 teaspoon instant
minced onion
1 tube (7 and 1/2 ounces) prepared biscuits
Preheat oven to 350oF.  Mix all ingredients except biscuits
in baking dish.  Cover with foil and bake 1 hour. Remove
foil. Place biscuits on top of mixture.  Bake, uncovered,
12 minutes longer or until biscuits are brown.

CHICKEN TAMALE PIE (Mexican) Serves 8-10
Don't be alarmed if the cornmeal mixture gets lumpy$just
keep stirring and cooking and the mixture will become
consistently thick.
4 tablespoons butter or margarine, divided
1 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups cooked chicken, cut in cubes
1 can (12-ounces) tomato puree
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 cup pitted and chopped ripe olives
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander seed
3 teaspoons salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
6 cups chicken broth, divided
2 cups cornmeal
In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon
butter.  Add onion and garlic and saute for 1 minute.  Add
chicken, tomato puree, chili powder, olives, coriander, 1
teaspoon of the salt, pepper and 1/2 cup chicken broth.
Cover and simmer 15 minutes.  Preheat oven to 325oF.  Bring
remaining broth to a boil in large saucepan.  Add salt and
butter.  Stir in cornmeal.  Cook at low heat 15 minutes,
stirring constantly.  Line a large shallow baking dish with
half of the cornmeal mixture.  Pour in chicken mixture.
Cover with remaining cornmeal mixture.  Bake for 1 1/2
hours.
EMPANADA PIEServes 4
This is a South American version of chicken pot pie.
2 cups  flour
3/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter or margarine, divided
2 tablespoons lard or shortening
About 1/3 cup ice-cold water
1/2 cup thinly sliced onion
1 cup thinly sliced green pepper
1 hot green chili pepper, chopped (optional)
1/2 cup pitted green olives, sliced into rounds
1 cup raisins
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1 cup chopped fresh or stewed tomatoes
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
3 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 egg, beaten
Pastry
In a small bowl, combine flour and salt.  With pastry
blender or 2 knives, cut in 6 tablespoons butter and lard
until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.  Gradually stir in
water until dough forms a ball; do not overmix.
Preheat oven to 425F and grease a deep 9-inch pie plate or
ovenproof dish.  Roll out 2/3 of the pastry and use to line
bottom of pie plate.  Pierce well with a fork.  Roll
remaining pastry to 1/8-inch thickness for top crust.
(Pastry can be prepared ahead and refrigerated until
filling is ready.)
Filling
In medium-sized saucepan over medium-high heat, melt
remaining butter.  Add onion and pepper; saute for 3
minutes or until softened.  Add olives, raisins, vinegar,
tomatoes and tomato paste and cook 5 minutes.  Season with
cinnamon and salt; stir in chicken.  Spread chicken mixture
in prepared pie plate and top with pastry.  Flute edges,
cut decorative slits in top, and brush with beaten egg.
Bake on bottom shelf of oven 30 minutes or until browned.

FANCY CHICKEN PUFF PIEServes 4
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/4 cup chopped shallots  or scallions
1/4 cup  flour
1 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup  dry sherry
Salt to taste
 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
Pinch nutmeg
1/4 pound ham, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch strips
3 cups cooked chicken, cut in 1/4-inch by 2-inch strips
1-1/2 cups fresh, or a package (10 ounces) frozen,
asparagus,cooked tender-crisp and cut in 2-inch pieces
1 cup (1/2 pint) heavy cream
Chilled flaky pastry for a 1-crust pie or 1 sheet frozen
puff pastry
1 egg, beaten
In a medium-sized saucepan, oven medium-high heat, melt
butter and saute shallots lightly.  Whisk in flour; cook 3
minutes and add broth and sherry.  Heat to boiling,
whisking constantly; season to taste with salt, pepper, and
nutmeg.  Reduce heat to low and simmer 5 minutes.  Stir in
ham, chicken, asparagus, and cream.  Pour chicken mixture
in 9-inch pie plate.
Preheat oven to 425F.  Cut an 8-inch circle from pastry,
tracing around a plate as pattern.  Cut pastry hearts from
extra dough with cookie cutter, if desired.  Place circle
of dough on a cookie sheet moistened with cold water.
Pierce with tines of fork, brush with egg and decorate with
cutout hearts; brush hearts with egg.
Place pastry on cookie sheet and the filled pie plate in
oven.  Bake 10 minutes; lower heat to 350F and bake 10 to
15 additional minutes or until pastry is golden brown and
filling is hot.  With a spatula, carefully place pastry lid
on hot filling and serve immediately.
CHICKEN A LA KING WITH BUTTERMILK BISCUITSServes 3-4
According to food historians, Chicken a la King got its
name, not from some former monarch, but from the E. Clark
King family, proprietors of a fashionable resort near
Manhattan at the turn of the century. The original recipe
used cream and sherry and egg yolks, and was served over
toast points. This is somewhat lighter and a lot easier.
If you have the time and are in the mood, skip the cream of
chicken soup, and instead, use a basic white sauce made
with chicken broth. If you don't have your own favorite
white sauce recipe, here's a quick and simple one: Stir 4
tablespoons of flour into 4 tablespoons of melted butter.
Cook for a couple of minutes, but don't let brown.  Slowly
stir in 2 cups chicken broth. Continue stirring until
thickened.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.
2 cups cooked chicken, cut in chunks
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup pimento, chopped
1/4 pound small fresh mushrooms, sliced (1 cup)
2 cans (10-1/2 ounces each) cream of chicken soup,
undiluted
In a saucepan over low heat combine all ingredients and
cook for about 20 minutes or until heated through.  Serve
on buttermilk biscuits.  You can buy them ready-to-bake in
a tube, or else make them from scratch, following this
recipe:
Buttermilk Biscuits
2 cups  flour
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 cup shortening or butter
About 3/4 cup buttermilk
Preheat oven to 425F.  In large bowl, sift together flour,
salt, baking powder, and baking soda.  Cut in shortening
until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.  Stir in just enough
buttermilk so dough holds together; turn out onto a floured
surface.  Pat to a 1/2-inch thickness and cut into 2-inch
rounds.  Bake 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden.
CHICKEN AND CORN SOUP                             Serves 2
- 3
3 cups chicken broth
1 1/2 cups cooked, diced, chicken
1 can (8 3/4 ounces) cream-style corn
1 tablespoon dry sherry
Salt and pepper to taste
1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 3 tablespoons
water
1 cup watercress leaves
In a saucepan over medium heat bring broth to a boil.  Add
chicken, corn, sherry, salt and pepper.  Simmer 2 to 3
minutes.  Stir in cornstarch mixture and cook stirring
constantly, 1 to 2 minutes or until slightly thickened.
Stir in watercress and serve immediately.

CHICKEN CHOW MEIN (Chinese) Serves 4-6
Using the cream of mushroom soup puts this recipe in the
category of "fast food."  It's good, but if you have the
time and the inclination, you'll get fresher-tasting
results if you substitute your best white sauce recipe for
the canned mushroom soup. Also, if you have a choice
between buying dark soy sauce and light soy sauce, remember
the dark one is sweeter$molasses or caramel is added$and
light soy sauce is saltier.
1-1/2 cups cooked chicken, cut in chunks
1 can (3-ounces) chow mein noodles, divided
1 can (6-1/2-ounces) cashew nuts, divided
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) cream of mushroom soup, undiluted
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons soy sauce
Preheat oven to 350oF.  In a baking dish combine chicken,
1/2 of noodles, 1/2 of nuts, soup, broth and soy sauce in
baking dish, mixing well.  Top with remaining noodles and
cashews.  Bake  for about 30 minutes.
CHICKEN-IN-EVERY-POT SOUPServes 4-6
For the best flavor, use fresh vegetables, varying them
according to the season. Speaking of fresh vegetables, do
you know how to tell a good carrot?  Look at the "crown,"
(that's the stem end).  If the crown is turning brown or
black or has regrowth visible where the stem was, you've
got a carrot that's been around awhile. If the crown and
shoulders are a bright orange, you've got a nice, fresh
carrot.
1 cup potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
4 cups chicken broth
1/4 cup dry sherry
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup onions, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup carrots, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch sticks
1 cup celery, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch sticks
1 cup fresh or frozen green beans, in 2-inch pieces
2 cups cooked chicken, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch julienne
strips
1 cup zucchini, in 1/4-inch by 2-inch sticks
Place potatoes in a saucepan with enough salted water to
cover.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.  Cook
potatoes 5 minutes; drain, rinse under cold water and set
aside.  In large saucepan over medium-high heat, bring
broth and sherry to a boil.  Season with salt and pepper.
Add onions, carrots, and celery and simmer 5 minutes.  Stir
in green beans and chicken and heat soup to boiling.  Add
zucchini and potatoes and simmer 1 minute longer.
Variation:  Chicken Minestrone
Add 1 cup chopped stewed tomatoes in their juice and 2 cups
cooked, drained fusilli or other pasta and 1/2-cup cooked
kidney beans when adding zucchini and potatoes.  Stir in
1/2-cup grated Parmesan cheese just before serving.  Other
fresh vegetables may be added according to their cooking
times.  Minestrone happens to be one of Frank's favorites,
although he skips the cheese because of its cholesterol.
NEW ENGLAND CHICKEN 'N' CORN CHOWDERServes 4-6
Chowders are thick soups which take their name from the
large French pot used in soup-making called a "chaudiere."
You can use fresh corn in this recipe, but I deliberately
suggested frozen  corn first because frozen corn can
actually taste sweeter and fresher than the fresh corn you
buy at the supermarket. Corn loses 50% of its sweetness in
just 24 hours at room temperature, and it can take days for
corn to get from the fields to the supermarket to your
house. In contrast, frozen corn is rushed from the fields
to the freezer in just a few hours, and once frozen, it
stops losing its sweetness.  Strange as it may seem, with
corn, frozen can taste fresher than fresh.
1/4 pound bacon or salt pork, diced
1 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups peeled potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
1 package (10 ounces) frozen corn or kernels from 2 ears of
corn
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 cup (1/2-pint) heavy cream
Oyster crackers, for garnish
In large saucepan over medium-high heat, saute bacon for 3
minutes until its fat has been rendered.  Add onions and
celery and cook 3 minutes longer.  Stir in broth and bring
to a boil, whisking constantly. Add potatoes and corn,
season with salt and pepper and cook 5 to 10 minutes or
until tender.  Stir in chicken and cream, simmer 3 minutes
and serve with oyster crackers.
Variation:   Shellfish Chowder
Add 1 cup chopped green pepper and 1 cup cooked crab or
shrimp to soup when adding chicken.

HEARTY LANCASTER CHICKEN, VEGETABLE AND DUMPLING SOUP
Serves 4
This is a famous Pennsylvania summer soup made with extra
vegetables for hearty winter eating. You can substitute
noodles for the dumplings, or add crackers, pretzels $ and
some people have told me that even popcorn works.  I'm
skeptical about the popcorn, but if you're feeling
adventurous, give it a try.
6 cups chicken broth
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup parboiled potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 cup parboiled carrots, cut in 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 cup shredded green cabbage
1 cup thinly-sliced leek, white and tender green parts
only, or 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 package (10-ounces) frozen corn kernels from 2 ears of
corn
Knepp
In large saucepan over high heat, bring broth to a boil.
Add other ingredients and reduce heat to low.  Simmer for 3
minutes while making dumplings.
Knepp (Little Dumplings)
1 egg
3/4 cup flour
1/3 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon  minced, fresh parsley, optional garnish
In small bowl, beat egg; stir in flour, water, salt, baking
powder, and nutmeg.  Drop batter by half teaspoons into the
simmering soup.  When dumplings rise to top, stir in
parsley and serve.
Variation:   Chicken Spinach Straciatella
Omit dumplings.  Clean and stem 1/2 pound fresh spinach;
stack and cut into 1/2-inch strips.  Whisk together 2 eggs
with 1/2-cup grated Parmesan cheese.  Stir in spinach with
chicken, then heat soup just to boiling.  Immediately pour
in the egg mixture in a thin stream, while stirring.  The
goal is to end up with thread-like strands of cooked egg.
Cook until soup simmers again; stir gently just before
serving.
CHICKEN-BACON SANDWICH Serves 6
Different kinds of bread make interesting variations.  You
can serve the sandwiches either open-face or topped with
another slice of bread. I like open-face sandwiches that
the kids can decorate.
1 cup cooked, finely chopped chicken
1/4 cup chopped celery
2 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
4 tablespoons mayonnaise or salad dressing
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
6 slices crisp cooked bacon
In a mixing bowl combine all ingredients except bacon and
spread on favorite kind of bread.  Break slices of cooked
bacon in half and place on top of sandwich.
HOT CHICKENWICHServes 6
If chicken has been chilled, it should be placed in 250oF
oven, uncovered, for about 3 minutes.  If you have the
time, substitute a good homemade white sauce made with
chicken broth for the cream of chicken soup. If you don't
have the time, (and I bet that happens to you often!) the
chicken soup shortcut is still very good.
6 slices hot buttered toast
1 can (3-1/2-ounces) deviled ham
1 chicken, cooked and sliced
3 tablespoons minced, fresh parsley
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) cream of chicken soup, undiluted and
heated
Salt to taste (you may not want any since the soup and the
deviled ham are both fairly salty)
Spread deviled ham on buttered toast; sprinkle with
parsley.  Place sliced chicken on toast.  Pour hot soup
over each sandwich.
QUICK CHICKEN TETRAZZINI        Serves 2-3
This is even better after standing to let the flavors
blend.  Green beans and broiled tomato go nicely with this.
If you have time, use a good homemade white sauce made with
chicken broth and mushrooms instead of the cream of
mushroom soup.
1 cup cooked, diced chicken
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) cream of mushroom soup, undiluted
1/2 cup cooked spaghetti (1/4 cup uncooked yields 1/2 cup
cooked)
2 tablespoons  dry sherry
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Salt and ground pepper to taste (you may not want any since
the soup is fairly salty)
Preheat oven to 375oF.  In a baking dish combine all
ingredients and bake for about 30 minutes until hot and
lightly browned.
SALADS
CHICKEN SPRING SALADServes 6-8
Spinach is an excellent source of Vitamins A and C, as well
as potassium and magnesium.  When you eat it uncooked, as
in this recipe, dentists say spinach is a detergent food,
helpful to dental health.
3 cups cooked chicken, cut in chunks
1 package (10-ounces) raw spinach, washed and drained with
stems removed and torn into small pieces
 1 small clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon chives, snipped, fresh or frozen
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground pepper
1 teaspoon sugar
3/4 cup chopped pecans
2 apples, chopped
1/2 cup oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
In a salad bowl combine all ingredients and toss lightly.
FRENCH DRESSING CHICKEN SALADServes 3-4
This is a real "fast food," perfect for when you've got a
lot of other things to do besides fuss in the kitchen.
It's quick and easy, but the Cayenne pepper gives it a
little perk that lifts it out of the ordinary.
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1/2 cup finely chopped celery
1/4 cup French dressing
1/4 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/8 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
In a salad bowl toss together all ingredients and serve on
lettuce.

OLIVEY CHICKEN SALADServes 6
I like this recipe partly because it tastes good, but also
because it's a dandy use for leftover rice as well as
leftover chicken.
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 cup cooked rice (1/4 cup uncooked yields 1 cup cooked)
3/4 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup sliced pimento-stuffed green olives
1/4 cup toasted slivered almonds
 1/4 cup thinly sliced scallions
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1/2 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
In a mixing bowl combine all ingredients and serve salad on
a bed of lettuce leaves.
SUNSHINE CHICKEN SALADServes 4-6
The avocado you use in this recipe should be fully ripe,
and that means it will have a slight give to it when you
press it between your palms.  If it has about as much
"give" to it as a baseball, let it ripen for a couple of
days more at room temperature.  But don't refrigerate it
because refrigeration puts a permanent stop to all
ripening.
3 cups cooked, diced chicken
1 can (6-ounces) orange juice concentrate
3 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/8 teaspoon Tabasco
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup diced ripe olives
1 medium avocado, cut in small chunks
1/4 cup toasted, slivered almonds
In a blender or food processor, make dressing by blending
orange juice concentrate, oil, vinegar, sugar, dry mustard,
salt and Tabasco at high speed 5 seconds or until smooth.
In a salad bowl combine chicken, celery, olives, avocado
and almonds.  Pour dressing over.  Toss and chill at least
30 minutes before serving.
TANGY CHICKEN SALADServes 3-4
Have you ever gotten the hard cooked eggs and the uncooked
eggs mixed up in the refrigerator$and you wanted to know
which was which without breaking them?  If that should
happen when you're making this recipe, here's what to do.
Spin them.  The one that whirls around like a spinning top
is hardcooked. The one that wobbles and doesn't spin well
is still raw.
2 cups cooked, diced chicken
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1/4 cup chopped celery
1 hard cooked egg, chopped
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish
1/2 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
In a salad bowl toss together all ingredients.  Serve on
crisp lettuce.
HEARTY CHICKEN SOUP IN A HURRYServes 4
This is an easy soup for a beginning cook. It's also good
in a thermos for a school lunch  on a cold day. I can't
count the number of times I've made it when I've been in a
hurry.
2 cans (13-1/2 ounces each) chicken broth
1 cup cooked, diced chicken
1 cup cooked, high-protein wagon wheel macaroni or other
pasta
1 cup frozen mixed vegetables
In a saucepan over medium heat bring broth to a simmer.
Stir in chicken, pasta and vegetables.  Reduce heat to low;
simmer 5 minutes until vegetables are tender-crisp.  Spoon
soup into a wide-mouth thermos jar and close tightly.
Serve with crackers or lightly buttered bread.
SAUCY CHICKEN BUNDLES Serves 4
This takes time but it looks good and tastes terrific. It's
not a gourmet item, but it's something a young cook can
really enjoy making and showing off.
2 cups biscuit mix
1/2 cup milk
1 cup cooked, diced chicken
1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted
2 cans (10-1/2-ounces each) cream of chicken soup,
undiluted
1 can (10-1/2-ounces) jellied cranberry sauce
In a mixing bowl add milk to biscuit mix to form dough.
Roll dough into a square about 1/4-inch thick.  Cut dough
into 3-inch squares (makes about 8).  In a small bowl
combine chicken, butter and 4 tablespoons of soup.  Put 2
tablespoons of this mixture on each pastry square.  Bring
four corners of square together and pinch closed.  Preheat
oven to 450oF.  Place on baking sheet and bake for 15
minutes.  Heat remaining soup and pour over baked squares.
Slice can of cranberry sauce into 1/4-inch slices.  With
star-shaped cookie cutter, cut star from each slice of
cranberry sauce and place on top of baked bundle before
serving.








Conclusion: THE STORY OF A RARE BIRD


This part has almost nothing to do with recipes and
cooking, but I've  been trying to guess what you were
looking for when you bought this book.

Clearly you wanted recipes from one of the world's
premier authorities on chicken.  I hope you've found this
when looking at Frank's favorites.

But maybe you're also like many people who enjoy
reading cookbooks almost as much as they enjoy the cooking.
Over the years, hundreds of people have told me that they
buy cookbooks and only try a few recipes.  The real
pleasure they get from a cookbook is in reading it. Knowing
this, I've tried to make this book something that would be
fun to read as well.

But if you live in an area where Frank sells his
products, or if you've seen the PBS specials on him or read
about him in In Search of Excellence, or perhaps read about
him in some of the gossip columns, you may also have an
additional reason to buy this book.  Perhaps you were
curious about him as a person.   What kind of man built a
company from a father and son operation to one that today
processes more than a million chickens a day and has sales
in excess of a billion dollars a year?  What is he really
like?

To me, his outstanding characteristic is that he gives
of himself.  I've seen first hand how he gives of himself
for the sake of doing the best job he can for both
consumers and for the people who work for the company. I
know how often he's set the alarm for 4:45 a.m. after being
up until 1:30 a.m. so he can get a head start on work.
When he's really busy with something, I've seen him get by
with two hours sleep after a month of getting only four
hours.

He cares so much for the people who work for him that
I've heard him make transatlantic phone calls even during
our honeymoon to make sure a low level associate's
grievance was handled fairly.  I've been touched by how
often he visits retired associates, now in their 80s and
90s.  Company functions mean so much to him that once,
after we had been traveling for twenty-three hours on our
return from the Soviet Union, he went straight to a Perdue
Volunteer Fire Brigade Appreciation Dinner rather than
going home to bed.  The associates meant far more to him
than his sleep.  When one of the Perdue truckers needed
help loading boxes, Frank worked alongside him until the
job was done because Frank believed the man had a right to
be home with his family.

Even in the building of the company, I find him
generous.  That may seem like an unusual way to look at the
work of an entrepreneur, but he is providing jobs and a
quality product; he's not  engaged in leveraged buy-outs
and paper transactions.

Many people know that Frank Perdue is famous for his
chickens, his financial success, his marketing innovations,
his drive, his creativity, or even his eccentricities, but
I think that his greatest success lies elsewhere.  To me,
true success isn't measured by what you get, but rather by
what you give.  The tough man who makes those tender
chickens, is an unusually giving man.





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Ronald Hunter
           
  Copyright © Ronald Hunter, 2005. All rights reserved.
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