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THE

QUEENE-LIKE CLOSET

Or

RICH CABINET


[Illustration]


Printed for Rich: Lownes

White Lion in Duck Layne neare West Smithfield




The Queen-like Closet

OR

RICH CABINET:

Stored with all manner of

RARE RECEIPTS

For

_Preserving, Candying and Cookery_.

Very Pleasant and Beneficial to all Ingenious Persons of the

FEMALE SEX.


BY HANNAH WOLLEY.


The Second EDITION.


LONDON

Printed for _Richard Lowndes_ at the _White Lion_ in _Duck-Lane_, near
_West-Smithfield_, 1672.




TO THE

TRULY VERTUOUS

AND

My much Honoured Friend

Mrs. _GRACE BUZBY_,

Daughter to the Late

_Sr. HENRY CARY_,

Knight Banneret;

And WIFE to

Mr. _ROBERT BUZBY_,

Gentleman, and Wollen Draper of LONDON


_Madam_,

Your Kind and Good Acceptance of my Endeavours in Work for You, and that
Esteem You have for what else I can do, make me bold to present this
Book to You; which by that time You have perused, I doubt not but You
will deem it worthy of the Title it bears; and indeed it was never
opened before: If it may yield You any Delight or Benefit, I shall be
glad; for as You have a true Love and Esteem for me, so I have a very
great Love and Honourable Esteem for You; and shall always be

_Your most Observant

servant_,

_HANNAH WOLLEY._




To all Ladies, Gentlewomen, and to all other of the Female Sex who do
delight in, or be desirous of good Accomplishments.


Ladies and Gentlewomen,

_I Presume those Bookes which have passed from me formerly, have got me
some little credit and esteem amongst you.

But there being so much time past since they were Printed, that
methinks, I hear some of you say_ I wish Mrs. _Wolley_ would put forth
some New Experiments _and to say the Truth, I have been importun'd by
divers of my Friends and Acquaintance to do so._

_I shall not give an Apish Example every Day or Week to follow
ridiculous and foolish Fancies, nor could I be too like the_ Spaniard,
_always to keep in one Dress: I am not ashamed, nor do I disown what I
have already Printed, but some of you being so perfect in your
practises, and I very desirous still to serve you, do now present you
with this_ Queen-like Closet: _I do assure you it is worthy of the
Title it bears, for the very precious things you will find in it._

_Thus beseeching your kind Acceptance of this Book, and of my earnest
Desires to you, I take my Leave, but shall always be to all who have
esteem for me,_

Their Faithful and

Humble Servant,

HANNAH WOLLEY.




    _Ladies, I do here present you (yet)
    That which sure will well content
    A Queen-like Closet rich and brave
    (Such) not many Ladies have:
    Or Cabinet, in which doth set
    Jems richer than in Karkanet;
    (They) only Eies and Fancies please,
    These keep your Bodies in good ease;
    They please the Taste, also the Eye;
    Would I might be a stander by:
    Yet rather I would wish to eat,
    Since 'bout them I my Brains do beat:
    And 'tis but reason you may say,
    If that I come within your way;
    I sit here sad while you are merry,
    Eating Dainties, drinking Perry;
    But I'm content you should so feed,
    So I may have to serve my deed._

_Hannah Wolley._




These things following are sold by _Richard Lowndes_ Book-seller, at the
_White-Lion_ in _Duck-Lane_ near _West-Smithfield_.

A Cordial Powder, which doth infallibly Cure the _Rickets_ in Children,
and causeth an easie production of Teeth.

Dr. _Lionel Lockyer_'s Universal Pill, curing any Disease curable by
Physick; it operates gently and safely, it being very amicable to Nature
in purifying the whole Body throughout, and then subduing all Diseases,
whether internal or external, as hath been experimented by persons of
all sorts and sexes, both young and old, with admirable success.

Mr. _Matthew_ his Diaphoretick and Diuretick Pill, purging by Sweat and
Urine: This Pill being composed of Simples of a very powerful operation,
purged from their churlish and malignant quality by an excellent Balsam
of long preparation, is by it made so amicable to Nature, that it hath
upon ample experience been found effectual for curing all common
Diseases.

Mr. _Edmund Buckworth's_ famous Lozenges, for the Cure of Consumptions,
Catarrhs, Asthma's, Phtisick, and all other Diseases incident to the
Lungs, Colds new and old, Hoarsness, Shortness of Breath, and Stuffings
of the Stomach; also a sovereign Antidote against the Plague, and all
other contagious Diseases.

The famous Spirit of Salt of the World, well known for a sovereign
Remedy against most Diseases; Truly and only prepared by _Constantine
Rhodocanaces_, Grecian, one of His Majesties Chymists.




THE

Queen-like CLOSET,

OR

Rich Cabinet.


1. _To make_ Aqua Mirabilis _a very delicate way._

Take three Pints of Sack, three Pints of White Wine, one quart of the
Spirit of Wine, one quart of the juice of Celandine leaves, of
Melilot-flowers, Cardamum-seeds, Cubebs, Galingale, Nutmegs, Cloves,
Mace, Ginger, two Drams of each; bruise them, and mix them with the Wine
and Spirits, let it stand all night in the Still, not an Alembeck, but
a common Still, close stopped with Rye Paste; the next morning make a
slow fire in the Still, and all the while it is stilling, keep a wet
Cloth about the neck of the Still, and put so much white Sugar Candy as
you think fit into the Glass where it drops.


2. _The Plague-Water which was most esteemed of in the late great
Visitation._

Take three Pints of Muskadine, boil therein one handful of Sage, and one
handful of Rue until a Pint be wasted, then strain it out, and set it
over the Fire again.

Put thereto a Penniworth of Long Pepper, half an Ounce of Ginger, and a
quarter of an Ounce of Nutmegs, all beaten together, boil them together
a little while close covered, then put to it one penniworth of
Mithridate, two penniworth of Venice Treacle, one quarter of a Pint of
hot Angelica Water.

Take one Spoonful at a time, morning and evening always warm, if you be
already diseased; if not, once a day is sufficient all the Plague time.

It is most excellent Medicine, and never faileth, if taken before the
heart be utterly mortified with the Disease, it is also good for the
Small Pox, Measles, or Surfets.


3. _A very Soveraign Water._

Take one Gallon of good Claret Wine, then take Ginger, Galingale,
Cinnamon, Nutmegs, Grains, Cloves, Anniseeds, Fennel-seeds,
Caraway-seeds, of each one dram; then take Sage, Mint, Red-Rose leaves,
Thyme, Pellitory of the Wall, Rosemary, Wild Thyme, Camomile, Lavander,
of each one handful, bruise the Spices small and beat the Herbs, and put
them into the Wine, and so let stand twelve hours close covered,
stirring it divers times, then still it in an Alembeck, and keep the
best Water by it self, and so keep every Water by it self; the first you
may use for aged People, the other for younger.

This most excellent Water was from Dr. _Chambers_, which he kept secret
till he had done many Cures therewith; it comforteth the Vital Spirits;
it helpeth the inward Diseases that come of Cold; the shaking of the
Palsie; it helpeth the Conception of Women that are barren; it killeth
the Worms within the Body, helpeth the Stone within the Bladder; it
cureth the Cold, Cough, and Tooth-ach, and comforteth the Stomach; it
cureth the Dropsie, and cleanseth the Reins; it helpeth speedily the
stinking Breath; whosoever useth this Water, it preserveth them in good
health, and maketh seem young very long; for it comforteth Nature very
much; with this water Dr. _Chambers_ preserved his own life till extreme
Age would suffer him neither to go nor stand one whit, and he continued
five years after all Physicians judged he could not live; and he
confessed that when he was sick at any time, he never used any other
Remedy but this Water, and wished his Friends when he lay upon his
Deth-Bed to make use of it for the preservation of their Health.


4. _To Make Spirit of Mints._

Take three Pints of the best white Wine, three handfuls of right Spear
mint picked clean from the stalks, let it steep in the wine one night
covered, in the morning, put it into a Copper Alembeck, and draw it with
a pretty quick fire; and when you have drawn it all, take all your Water
and add as much Wine as before, and put to the Water, and the same
quantity of Mint as before; let it steep two or three hours, then put
all into your Still, and draw it with a soft fire, put into your
Receiver a quantity of Loaf Sugar, and you will find it very excellent;
you may distil it in an ordinary Still if you please; but then it will
not be so strong nor effectual.

Thus you may do with any other Herbs whatsoever.


5. _To make the Cordial Orange-Water._

Take one dozen and a half of the highest coloured and thick rin'd
Oranges, slice them thin, and put them into two Pints of Malago Sack,
and one Pint of the best Brandy, of Cinamon, Nutmegs, Ginger, Cloves,
and Mace, of each one quarter of an Ounce bruised, of Spear-mint and
Balm one handful of each, put them into an ordinary Still all night,
pasted up with Rye Paste; the next day draw them with a slow fire, and
keep a wet Cloth upon the Neck of the Still; put in some Loaf Sugar into
the Glass where it dropeth.


6. _To make Spirit of Oranges or of Limons._

Take of the thickest rin'd Oranges or Limons, and chip off the Rinds
very thin, put these Chips into a Glass-bottle, and put in as many as
the Glass will hold, then put in as much Malago Sack as the Glass will
hold besides; stop the bottle close that no Air get in, and when you
use it, take about half a spoonful in a Glass of Sack; it is very good
for the Wind in the Stomach.


7. _To make Limon Water._

Take twelve of the fairest Limons, slice them, and put them into two
Pints of white Wine, and put to them of Cinamon and Galingale, of each,
one quarter of an Ounce, of Red Rose Leaves, Burrage and Bugloss
Flowers, of each one handful, of yellow Sanders one Dram, steep all
these together 12 hours, then distil them gently in a Glass Still, put
into the Glass where it droppeth, three Ounces of Sugar, and one Grain
of Amber-Greece.


8. _A Water for fainting of the Heart._

Take of Bugloss water and Red Rose Water, of each one Pint, of Red Cows
milk half a Pint, Anni-seed and Cinamon of each half an Ounce bruised,
Maiden hair two handfuls, Harts-tongue one handful, bruise them, and mix
all these together, and distil them in an ordinary Still, drink of it
Morning and Evening with a little Sugar.


9. _To make Rosemary Water._

Take a Quart of Sack or white Wine with as many Rosemary Flowers as will
make it very thick, two Nutmegs, and two Races of Ginger sliced thin
into it; let it infuse all night, then distil it in an ordinary Still as
your other waters.


10. _To make a most precious Water._

Take two Quarts of Brandy, of Balm, of Wood-Betony, of Pellitory of the
Wall, of sweet Marjoram, of Cowslip-Flowers, Rosemary-Flowers,
Sage-Flowers, Marigold-Flowers, of each of these one handful bruised
together; then take one Ounce of Gromwell seeds, one Ounce of sweet
Fennel seeds, one Ounce of Coriander seeds bruised, also half an Ounce
of Aniseeds and half an Ounce of Caraway-seeds, half an Ounce of Juniper
Berries, half an Ounce of Bay Berries, One Ounce of green Licoras, three
Nutmegs, one quarter of an Ounce of large Mace, one quarter of an Ounce
of Cinamon, one quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, half an Ounce of Ginger,
bruise all these well together, then add to them half a pound of Raisons
in the Sun stoned, let all these steep together in the Brandy nine days
close stopped, then strain it out, and two Grains of Musk, two of
Amber-Greece, one pound of refined Sugar; stop the Glass that no Air get
in, and keep it in a warm place.


11. _Doctor_ Butler's _Treacle Water._

Take the roots of Polipody of the Oak bruised, _Lignum Vitæ_ thin
sliced, the inward part thereof, Saxifrage roots thin sliced, of the
shavings of Harts-horn, of each half a pound, of the outward part of
yellow Citron not preserved; one Ounce and half bruised, mix these
together;

Then take

   {Fumitory water}
   {Carduus-water }   Of each one
of {Camomile-water}   Ounce.
   {Succory-water }

of Cedar wood one Ounce, of Cinamon three drams, of Cloves three drams,
bruise all your forenamed things;

Then take of Epithimum two ounces and a half, of Cerratch six ounces, of
Carduus and Balm, of each two handfuls, of Burrage Flowers, Bugloss
Flowers, Gillyflowers, of each four ounces, of Angelica root, Elecampane
root beaten to a Pap, of each four ounces, of Andronichus Treacle and
Mithridate, of each four ounces; mix all these together, and
incorporate them well, and grind them in a Stone Mortar, with part of
the former Liquor, and at last, mix all together, and let them stand
warm 24 hours close stopped, then put them all into a Glass Still, and
sprinkle on the top of _Species Aromatica rosata_ and _Diambre_, of the
Species of _Diarodon abbatis_, _Diatrion Santalon_, of each six drams;
then cover the Still close, and lute it well, and distill the water with
a soft fire, and keep it close.

This will yield five Pints of the best water, the rest will be smaller.


12. _The Cordial Cherry Water._

Take nine pounds of red Cherries, nine pints of Claret Wine, eight
ounces of Cinamon, three ounces of Nutmegs; bruise your Spice, stone
your Cherries, and steep them in the Wine, then add to them half a
handful of Rosemary, half a handful of Balm, one quarter of a handful of
sweet Marjoram, let them steep in an earthen Pot twenty four hours, and
as you put them into the Alembeck, to distil them, bruise them with your
hands, and make a soft fire under them, and distil by degrees; you may
mix the waters at your pleasure when you have drawn them all; when you
have thus done, sweeten it with Loaf-Sugar, then strain it into another
Glass, and stop it close that no Spirits go out; you may (if you please)
hang a Bag with Musk and Amber-greece in it, when you use it, mix it
with Syrrup of Gilly-flowers or of Violets, as you best like it; it is
an excellent Cordial for Fainting fits, or a Woman in travel, or for any
one who is not well.


13. _A most excellent Water for the Stone, or for the Wind-Cholick._

Take two handfuls of Mead-Parsly, otherwise called Saxifrage, one
handful of Mother-Thyme, two handfuls of Perstons, two handfuls of
Philipendula, and as much Pellitory of the Wall, two ounces of sweet
Fennel seeds, the roots of ten Radishes sliced, steep all these in a
Gallon of Milk warm from the Cow, then distil it in an ordinary Still,
and four hours after, slice half an ounce of the wood called Saxifrage,
and put into the Bottle to the water, keep it close stopped, and take
three spoonfuls at a time, and fast both from eating and drinking one
hour after; you must make this water about Midsummer; it is a very
precious water, and ought to be prized.


14. _The Cock water, most delicate and precious for restoring out of
deep Consumptions, and for preventing them, and for curing of Agues,
proved by my self and many others._

Take a Red Cock, pluck him alive, then slit him down the back, and take
out his Intrals, cut him in quarters, and bruise him in a Mortar, with
his Head, Legs, Heart, Liver and Gizard; put him into an ordinary Still
with a Pottle of Sack, and one quart of Milk new from a red Cow, one
pound of blew Currants beaten, one pound of Raisins in the Sun stoned
and beaten, four Ounces of Dates stoned and beaten, two handfuls of
Peniroyal, two handfuls of Pimpernel, or any other cooling Herb, one
handful of Mother-thyme, one handful of Rosemary one handful of Burrage,
one quart of Red Rose water, two ounces of Harts-horn, two ounces of
China root sliced, two ounces of Ivory shaving, four ounces of the
flower of French Barley; put all these into your Still and paste it up
very well, and still it with a soft fire, put into the Glass where it
droppeth one pound of white Sugar Candy beaten very small, twelve
peniworth of Leaf-Gold, seven grains of Musk, eleven grains of
Amber-greece, seven grains of Bezoar stone; when it is all distilled,
mix all the waters together, and every morning fasting, and every
evening when you go to bed, take four or five Spoonfuls of it warm, for
about a Month together, this hath cured many when the Doctors have given
them over.


15. _Walnut water, or the Water of Life._

Take green Walnuts in the beginning of _June_, beat them in a Mortar,
and distil them in an ordinary Still, keep that Water by it self, then
about Midsummer gather some more, and distil them as you did before,
keep that also by it self, then take a quart of each and mix them
together, and distil them in a Glass Still, and keep it for your use;
the Virtues are as followeth; It will help all manner of Dropsies and
Palsies, drank with Wine fasting; it is good for the eyes, if you put
one drop therein; it helpeth Conception in Women if they drink thereof
one spoonful at a time in a Glass of Wine once a day, and it will make
your skin fair if you wash therewith; it is good for all infirmities of
the Body, and driveth out all Corruption, and inward Bruises; if it be
drunk with Wine moderately, it killeth Worms in the Body; whosoever
drinketh much of it, shall live so long as Nature shall continue in him.

Finally, if you have any Wine that is turned, put in a little Viol or
Glass full of it, and keep it close stopped, and within four days it
will come to it self again.


16. _To make Wormwood Water._

Take four ounces of Aniseeds, four ounces of Licoras scraped, bruise
them well with two ounces of Nutmegs, add to them one good handful of
Wormwood, one root of Angelica, steep them in three Gallons of Sack Lees
and strong Ale together twelve hours; then distill them in an Alembeck,
and keep it for your use.


17. _A very rare Cordial Water._

Take one Gallon of white Wine, two ounces of Mithridate, two ounces of
Cinamon, one handful of Balm, a large handful of Cowslips, two handfuls
of Rosemary Flowers, half an ounce of Mace, half an ounce of Cloves,
half an ounce of Nutmegs, all bruised, steep these together four days in
an earthen Pot, and covered very close, distil them in an ordinary
Still well pasted, and do it with a very slow fire; save the first water
by it self, and the small by it self, to give to Children; when you have
occasion to use it, take a spoonful thereof, sweetned with Loaf-Sugar;
this Water is good to drive out any Infection from the heart, and to
comfort the Spirits.


18. _Another most excellent Cordial._

Take Celandine, Sage, Costmary, Rue, Wormwood, Mugwort, Scordium,
Pimpernel, Scabious, Egrimony, Betony, Balm, Carduus, Centory,
Peniroyal, Elecampane roots, Tormentil with the roots, Horehound, Rosa
Solis, Marigold Flowers, Angelica, Dragon, Marjoram, Thyme, Camomile, of
each two good handfuls; Licoras, Zedoary, of each one ounce; slice the
Roots, shred the Herbs, and steep them in four quarts of white Wine, and
let it stand close covered 2 days, then distil it in an ordinary Still
pasted up; when you use it, sweeten it with fine Sugar, and warm it.


19. _To make_ Rosa Solis.

Take a Pottle of _Aqua Composita_, and put it into a Glass, then a good
handful of _Rosa Solis_ clean picked, but not washed, put it to the
_Aqua Composita_, then take a pound of Dates stoned and beaten small,
half a peniworth of Long Pepper, as much of Grains, and of round Pepper,
bruise them small, take also a pound of Loaf-Sugar well beaten, a
quarter of a pound of Powder of Pearl, and six leaves of Book Gold; put
all to the rest, and stir them well together in the Glass, then cover it
very close, and let it stand in the Sun fourteen days, ever taking it in
at night; then strain it, and put it into a close Bottle; you must not
put in the Pearl, Gold or Sugar till it hath been sunned and strained,
neither must you touch the Leaves of the _Rosa Solis_ with your hands
when you pick it; keep it very close.


20. _The Heart Water._

Take five handfuls of Rosemary Flowers, two drams of red Coral, two
drams of Powder of Pearl, two drams of white Amber, two drams of
Cinamon, two pound of the best Prunes stoned, six Pints of Damask Rose
water, two Pints of Sack; put all these into a Pipkin never used, stop
it up with Paste, let them stand upon a soft fire a little while, then
distil it in an ordinary Still pasted up.


21. _The Plague Water._

Take Rosemary, Red Balm, Burrage, Angelica, Carduus, Celandine, Dragon,
Featherfew, Wormwood, Penyroyal, Elecampane roots, Mugwort, Bural,
Tormentil, Egrimony, Sage, Sorrel, of each of these one handful, weighed
weight for weight; put all these in an earthen Pot, with four quarts of
white Wine, cover them close, and let them stand eight or nine days in a
cool Cellar, then distil it in a Glass Still.


22. _The Treacle Water._

Take one pound of old Venice Treacle, of the Roots of Elecampane,
Gentian, Cyprus, Tormentil, of each one ounce, of Carduus and Angelica,
half an ounce, of Burrage, Bugloss, and of Rosemary Flowers one ounce of
each; infuse these in three Pints of white Wine, one Pint of Spring
Water, two Pints of Red Rose water; then distil them in an ordinary
Still pasted up.

This is excellent for Swounding Fits or Convulsions, and expelleth any
venomous Disease; it also cureth any sort of Agues.


23. _The Snail water excellent for Consumptions._

Take a Peck of Snails with the Shells on their Backs, have in a
readiness a good fire of Charcoal well kindled, make a hole in the midst
of the fire, and cast your Snails into the fire, renew your fire till
the Snails are well rosted, then rub them with a clean Cloth, till you
have rubbed off all the green which will come off.

Then bruise them in a Mortar, shells and all, then take Clary,
Celandine, Burrage, Scabious, Bugloss, five leav'd Grass, and if you
find your self hot, put in some Wood-Sorrel, of every one of these one
handful, with five tops of Angelica.

These Herbs being all bruised in a Mortar, put them in a sweet earthen
Pot with five quarts of white Wine, and two quarts of Ale, steep them
all night; then put them into an Alembeck, let the herbs be in the
bottom of the Pot, and the Snails upon the Herbs, and upon the Snails
put a Pint of Earth-worms slit and clean washed in white Wine, and put
upon them four ounces of Anniseeds or Fennel-seeds well bruised, and
five great handfuls of Rosemary Flowers well picked, two or three Races
of Turmerick thin sliced, Harts-horn and Ivory, of each four ounces,
well steeped in a quart of white Wine till it be like a Jelly, then draw
it forth with care.


24. _To make a rare sweet Water._

Take sweet Marjoram, Lavender, Rosemary, Muscovy, Maudlin, Balm, Thyme,
Walnut Leaves, Damask Roses, Pinks, of all a like quantity, enough to
fill your Still, then take of the best Orrice Powder, Damask Rose
Powder, and Storax, of each two ounces; strew one handful or two of your
Powders upon the Herbs, then distil them with a soft fire; tie a little
Musk in a piece of Lawn, and hang it in the Glass wherein it drops, and
when it is all drawn out, take your sweet Cakes and mix them with the
Powders which are left, and lay among your Clothes, or with sweet Oyles,
and burn them for perfume.


25. _A very good Surfet water._

Take what quantity of Brandy you please, steep a good quantity of the
Flowers of Red Poppies therein, which grow amongst the Wheat, having the
black bottoms cut off, when they have been steeped long enough, strain
them out, and put in new, and so do till the Brandy be very red with
them, and let it stand in the Sun all the while they infuse, then put in
Nutmegs, Cloves, Ginger and Cinamon, with some fine Sugar, so much as
you think fit, and keep it close stopped; this is very good for Surfets,
Wind in the Stomach, or any Illness whatever.


26. _An excellent Water for the Stomach, or against Infection._

Take Carduus, Mint and Wormwood, of each a like quantity, shred them
small and put them into new Milk, distil them in an ordinary Still with
a temperate fire; when you take any of it, sweeten it with Sugar, or
with any Syrrup, what pleases you best; it is a very good water, though
the Ingredients are but mean.


27. _The Melancholy Water._

Take of the Flowers of Gilliflowers, four handfuls, Rosemary flowers
three handfuls, Damask Rose leaves, Burrage and Bugloss flowers of each
one handful, of Balm leaves six handfuls, of Marigold flowers one
handful, of Pinks six handfuls, of Cinamon grosly beaten, half an ounce,
two Nutmegs beaten, Anniseeds beaten one ounce, three peniworth of
Saffron; put them all into a Pottle of Sack, and let them stand two
days, stirring them sometimes well together; then distil them in an
ordinary Still, and let it drop into a Glass wherein there is two grains
of Musk, and eight ounces of white Sugar Candy, and some Leaf-Gold; take
of this Water three times a week fasting, two spoonfuls at a time, and
ofter if you find need; distil with soft fire; this is good for Women in
Child-bed if they are faint.


28. _To make the Elder water, or spirit of_ Sambucus.

Take some Rye Leaven, and break it small into some warm Water, let it be
a sowre one, for that is best; about two Ounces or more: then take a
Bushel of Elder Berries beaten small, and put them into an earthen Pot
and mix them very well with the Leaven, and let it stand one day near
the Fire; then put in a little Yest, and stir it well together to make
it rise, so let it stand ten days covered, and sometimes stir it; then
distil it in an Alembeck; keep the first Water by it self, and so the
second, and the third will be good Vinegar, if afterward you colour it
with some of the Berries.

Distil it with a slow fire, and do not fill the Still too full.

This Water is excellent for the Stomach.


29. _To make the Balm water Green._

Take any Wine or Lees of Wine, or good Strong Beer or Ale with the
Grounds, and stir them all together very well, lest the Wine Lees be too
thick, and burn the bottom of the Pot; put them into an Alembeck with
good store of Balm unwashed, therein still these till you leave no other
tast but fair water, and draw also some of that, draw two Alembecks full
more as you draw the first, until you have so much as will fill your
Alembeck, then put this distilled water into your Alembeck again, and
some more Balm, if you draw a Wine Gallon, put to it half a pound of
Coriander seeds bruised, two Ounces of Cloves, one quarter of an Ounce
of Nutmegs, and one quarter of an Ounce of Mace bruised all of them,
then set a Receiver of a Gallon under it, and fill it with fresh and
green Balm unwashed, and your Water will be as green as Grass; put still
more and more of the Herbs fresh, and let it stand a week to make it the
more green.

Take this Green Water, and put to it one quart of the best Damask
Rosewater, and before you mix your Balm-water and Rose-water together,
you must dissolve two pounds of fine Sugar in the first distilled water,
then take Ambergreece and Musk, of each eight Grains, being ground fine,
and put it into the Glass in a piece of Lawn; put also a little Orange
or Limon Pill to it, and keep it cool and from the Air.


30. _To make the very best Surfet-water._

Take one Gallon of the best French Spirits, and a Pint of
Damask-Rose-water, half a Pint of Poppy water, one pound of white Sugar
Candy bruised, then take one pound and half of Raisins in the Sun
stoned, half a pound of Dates stoned and sliced, then take one Ounce of
Mace, one Ounce of Cloves, one Ounce of Cinamon, one Ounce of Aniseeds
rubbed clean from the dust, then take a quarter of an Ounce of Licoras
clean scraped and sliced, and all the Spices grosly beaten, let all
these steep in the Spirits four days; then take a quarter of a peck of
Red Poppy Leaves fresh gathered, and the black part cut off, and put
them in, and when it hath stood four or five days, strain it, and put it
into your Glass, then put in your Sugar-Candy finely beaten, twelve
peniworth of Ambergreece, six peniworth of Musk, keep it close, and
shake it now and then, and when you use it, you may put some kind of
Syrrup to it, what you please.


31. _To make the true Palsie-water, as it was given by that once very
famous Physician Doctor_ Matthias.

Take Lavender Flowers stripped from the stalks, and fill a Gallon-Glass
with them, and pour on them good Spirit of Sack, or perfect _Aqua vitæ_
distilled from all Flegm, let the quantity be five quarts, then
circulate them for six weeks, very close with a Bladder, that nothing
may breath out; let them stand in a warm place, then distil them in an
Alembeck with his Cooler, then put into the said water, of Sage,
Rosemary, and Wood-Betony Flowers; of each half a handful, of Lilly of
the Valley, and Burrage, Bugloss, and Cowslip Flowers, one handful of
each; steep these in Spirit of Wine, Malmsie, or _Aqua vitæ_, every one
in their Season, till all may be had; then put also to them of Balm,
Motherwort, Spike-flowers, Bay leaves, the leaves of Orange trees, with
the Flowers, if they may be had, of each one ounce, put them into the
aforesaid distilled Wine all together, and distil it as before, having
first been steeped six weeks; when you have distilled it, put into it
Citron Pill, dried Piony seeds hull'd, of each five Drams, of Cinamon
half an Ounce, of Nutmegs, Cardamum seeds, Cubebs, and yellow Saunders,
of each half an ounce, of lignum Aloes one dram; make all these into
Powder, and put them into the distilled Wine abovesaid, and put to them
of Cubebs anew, a good half pound of Dates, the stones taken out, and
cut them in small pieces, put all these in, and close your Vessel well
with a double Bladder; let them digest six weeks, then strain it hard
with a Press, and filtrate the Liquor, then put into it of prepared
Pearl, Smaragdus, Musk and Saffron, of each half a Scruple; and of
Ambergreece one Scruple, red Roses dried well, Red and Yellow Saunders,
of each one ounce, hang these in a Sarsenet Bag in the water, being well
sewed that nothing go out.

_The virtues of this Water._

This Water is of exceeding virtue in all Swoundings and Weaknesses of
the heart, and decaying of Spirits in all Apoplexies and Palsies, also
in all pains of the Joints coming of Cold, for all Bruises outwardly
bathed and dipped Clothes laid to; it strengtheneth and comforteth all
animal, natural and viral Spirits, and cheareth the external Senses,
strengtheneth the Memory, restoreth lost Speech, and lost Appetite, all
weakness of the Stomach, being both taken inwardly, and bathed
outwardly; it taketh away the Giddiness of the Head, helpeth lost
Hearing, it maketh a pleasant Breath, helpeth all cold disposition of
the Liver, and a beginning Dropsie; it helpeth all cold Diseases of the
Mother; indeed none can express sufficiently; it is to be taken morning
and evening, about half a Spoonful with Crums of Bread and Sugar.


32. _For a Cough of the Lungs, or any Cough coming of Cold, approved by
many._

Take a good handful of French Barley, boil it in several waters till you
see the water be clear, then take a quart of the last water, and boil in
it sliced Licoras, Aniseeds bruised, of each as much as you can take up
with your four Fingers and your Thumb, Violet Leaves, Strawberry Leaves,
five fingered Grass, Maidenhair, of each half a handful, a few Raisins
in the Sun stoned; boil these together till it come to a Pint, then
strain it, and take twelve or fourteen Jordan Almonds blanched and
beaten, and when your water is almost cold, put in your Almonds, and
stir it together, and strain it; then sweeten it with white Sugar Candy;
drink this at four times, in the morning fasting, and at four of the
Clock in the Afternoon a little warmed; do this nine or ten days
together; if you please, you may take a third draught when you go to
Bed; if you be bound in your body, put in a little Syrrup of Violets,
the best way to take it, is to suck it through a straw, for that conveys
it to the Lungs the better.


33. _To make the best Bisket-Cakes._

Take four new laid Eggs, leave out two of the Whites, beat them very
well, then put in two spoonfuls of Rose-water, and, beat them very well
together, then put in a pound of double refin'd Sugar beaten and
searced, and beat them together one hour, then put to them one pound of
fine Flower, and still beat them together a good while; then put them
upon Plates rubbed over with Butter, and set them into the Oven as fast
as you can, and have care you do not bake them too much.


34. _Perfumed Roses._

Take Damask Rose Buds, and cut off the Whites, then take Rose-water or
Orange-Flower water wherein hath been steeped _Benjamin_, _Storax_,
_Lignum Rhodium_, Civet or Musk, dip some Cloves therein and stick into
every Bud one, you must stick them in where you cut away the Whites; dry
them between white Papers, they will then fall asunder; this Perfume
will last seven years.

Or do thus.

Take your Rose Leaves cut from the Whites, and sprinkle them with the
aforesaid water, and put a little powder of Cloves among them.


35. _To make Tincture of Caraways._

Take one quart of the Spirits of French Wine, put into it one pound of
Caraway Comfits which are purled, and the Pills of two Citron Limons;
let it stand in a warm place to infuse, in a Glass close stopped for a
Month, stirring it every day once.

Then strain it from the seeds, and add to it as much Rosewater as will
make it of a pleasant taste, then hang in your Bottle a little
Ambergreece, and put in some Leaf-Gold; this is a very fine Cordial.


36. _To get away the Signs of the Small Pox._

Quench some Lime in white Rosewater, then shake it very well, and use it
at your pleasure; when you at any time have washed with it, anoint your
face with Pomatum, made with Spermaceti and oyl of sweet Almonds.


37. _To make clouted Cream._

Take Milk that was milked in the morning, and scald it at noon; it must
have a reasonable fire under it, but not too rash, and when it is
scalding hot, that you see little Pimples begin to rise, take away the
greatest part of the Fire, then let it stand and harden a little while,
then take it off, and let it stand until the next day, covered, then
take it off with a Skimmer.


38. _To make a_ Devonshire-_White-pot._

Take two quarts of new Milk, a peny white Loaf sliced very thin, then
make the Milk scalding hot, then put to it the Bread, and break it, and
strain it through a Cullender, then put in four Eggs, a little Spice,
Sugar, Raisins, and Currans, and a little Salt, and so bake it, but not
too much, for then it will whey.


39. _To make the_ Portugal _Eggs._

Take a very large Dish with a broad brim, lay in it some _Naples_ Bisket
in the Form of a Star, then put so much Sack into the Dish as you do
think the Biskets will drink up; then stick them full with thin little
pieces of preserved Orange, and green Citron Pill, and strew store of
French Comfits over them, of divers colours, then butter some Eggs, and
lay them here and there upon the Biskets, then fill up the hollow places
in the Dish, with several coloured Jellies, and round about the Brim
thereof lay Lawrel Leaves guilded with Leaf-Gold; lay them flaunting,
and between the Leaves several coloured Jellies.


40. _To Candy Flowers the best way._

Takes Roses, Violets, Cowslips, or Gilly-flowers, and pick them from the
white bottoms, then have boiled to a Candy height Sugar, and put in so
many Flowers as the Sugar will receive, and continually stir them with
the back of a Spoon, and when you see the Sugar harden on the sides of
the Skillet, and on the Spoon, take them off the Fire, and keep them
with stirring in the warm Skillet, till you see them part, and the Sugar
as it were sifted upon them, then put them upon a paper while they are
warm and rub them gently with your hands; till all the Lumps be broken,
then put them into a Cullender, and sift them as clean as may be, then
pour them upon a clean Cloth, and shake them up and down till there be
hardly any Sugar hanging about them; then if you would have them look as
though they were new gathered, have some help, and open them with your
fingers before they be quite cold, and if any Sugar hang about them, you
may wipe it off with a fine Cloth; to candy Rosemary Flowers, or
Archangel, you must pull out the string that stands up in the middle of
the Blossom, and take them which are not at all faded, and they will
look as though they were new gathered, without opening.


41. _To pickle Cucumbers._

Take the least you can get, and lay a layer of Cucumbers, and then a
layer of beaten Spices, Dill, and Bay Leaves, and so do till you have
filled your Pot, and let the Spices, Dill, and Bay Leaves cover them,
then fill up your Pot with the best Wine Vinegar, and a little Salt,
and so keep them.

Sliced Turneps also very thin, in some Vinegar, Pepper and a little
Salt, do make a very good Sallad, but they will keep but six Weeks.


42. _To make Sugar Cakes._

Take a pound of fine Sugar beaten and searced, with four Ounces of the
finest Flower, put to it one pound of Butter well washed with
Rose-water, and work them well together, then take the Yolks of four
Eggs, and beat them with four Spoonfuls of Rosewater, in which hath been
steeped two or three days before Nutmeg and Cinamon, then put thereto so
much Cream as will make it knead to a stiff Paste, rowl it into thin
Cakes, and prick them, and lay them on Plates, and bake them; you shall
not need to butter your Plates, for they will slip off of themselves,
when they are cold.


43. _To make a very fine Cream._

Take a quart of Cream, and put to it some Rosewater and Sugar, some
large Mace, Cinamon and Cloves; boil it together for a quarter of an
hour, then take the yolks of eight Eggs, beat them together with some
of your Cream, then put them into the Cream which is boiling, keep it
stirring lest it curdle, take it from the fire, and keep it stirring
till it be a little cold, then run it through a Strainer, dish it up,
and let it stand one night, the next day it will be as stiff as a
Custard, then stick it with blanched Almonds, Citron Pill and Eringo
roots, and so serve it in.


44. _To make Syrup of Turneps for a Consumption._

Take half a peck of Turneps washed and pared clean, cut them thin, put
to them one pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned, one quarter of a pound
of Figs cut small, one Ounce of Anniseeds bruised, half an Ounce of
Licoras sliced, one Ounce of Cloves bruised, two handfuls of Burrage
Flowers, and so much water as will cover all, and two fingers breadth
above them, then boil it on a great fire in an earthen Vessel covered,
untill the roots be soft and tender, then strain out the Liquor, and to
every Pint of it put a pound of fine Sugar, the whites of two Eggs
beaten, boil it to a Syrrop, and use it often, two or three spoonfuls at
a time.


45. _For a Consumption._

Take a Pint of Red Cows milk, then take the Yolk of a new laid Egg
potched very rare, then stir it into the Milk over a soft fire, but do
not let it boil, sweeten it with a little Sugar Candy, and drink it in
the morning fasting, and when you go to bed.


46. _To make Bottle Ale for a Consumption._

Take a quart of Ale, and a Pint of strong _Aqua vitæ_, Mace and Cinamon,
of each one quarter of an Ounce, two Spoonfuls of the powder Elecampane
root, one quarter of a pound of Loaf Sugar, one quarter of a pound of
Raisins of the Sun stoned, four spoonfuls of Aniseeds beaten to Powder,
then put all together into a Bottle and stop it close.

Take three spoonfuls of this in a morning fasting, and again one hour
before Supper and shake the Bottle when you pour it out.


47. _To make Cakes of Quinces._

Take the best you can get, and pare them, and slice them thin from the
Core, then put them into a Gallipot close stopped, and tie it down with
a Cloth, and put it into a Kettle of boiling water, so that it may stand
steddy about five hours, and as your water boils away in the Kettle,
fill it up with more warm water, then pour your Quinces into a fine hair
sieve, and let it drain all the Liquor into a Bason, then take this
Liquor and weigh it, and to every pound take a pound of double refin'd
Sugar, boil this Sugar to a Candy height, then put in your Liquor, and
set them over a slow fire, and stir them continually till you see it
will Jelly, but do not let it boil; then put it into Glasses, and set
them in a Stove till you see them with a Candy on the top, then turn
them out with a wet Knife on the other side upon a white Paper, sleeked
over with a sleek-stone, and set them in the Stove again till the other
side be dry, and then keep them in a dry place.


48. _To make Marmalade of Apricocks._

Take Apricocks, pare them and cut them in quarters, and to every pound
of Apricocks put a pound of fine Sugar, then put your Apricocks into a
Skillet with half of the Sugar, and let them boil very tender and
gently, and bruise them with the back of a Spoon, till they be like
Pap, then take the other part of the Sugar, and boil it to a Candy
height, then put your Apricocks into that Sugar, and keep it stirring
over the fire, till all the Sugar be melted, but do not let it boil,
then take it from the fire, and stir it till it be almost cold; then put
it in Glasses, and let it have the Air of the fire to dry it.


49. _To make Limon Cakes._

Take half a pound of refin'd sugar, put to it two spoonfuls of
Rosewater, as much Orange Flower water, and as much of fair water, boil
it to a Candy height, then put in the Rind of a Limon grated, and a
little Juice, stir it well on the fire, and drop it on Plates or sleeked
Paper.


50. _To make Wafers._

Take a quart of Flower heaped and put to it the yolks of four Eggs, and
two or three spoonfuls of Rosewater, mingle this well together, then
make it like Batter with Cream and a little Sugar, and bake it on Irons
very thin poured on.


51. _To make Marmalade of Cherries with Currans._

Take four pounds of Cherries when they are stoned, and boil them alone
in their Liquor for half an hour very fast, then pour away the Liquor
from them, and put to them half a Pint and little more of the juice of
Currans, then boil a pound of double refin'd Sugar to a Candy height,
and put your Cherries and Juice of Currans in that, and boil them again
very fast till you find it to jelly very well.


52. _To preserve Rasberries._

Take the weight of your Rasberries in fine Sugar, and take some
Rasberries and bruise them a little; then take the clearest of the
bruised Rasberries, I mean the Juice and the weight of it in Sugar, and
your other Sugar named before, and boil it, and scum it, then put in
your whole Rasberries, and boil them up once, then let them stand over
the fire without boiling till you see it will Jelly, and that it look
clear, then take up your Rasberries one by one, and put them into
Glasses, then boil your Syrrop, and put it over them.


53. _To make Syrrop of Ale, good for weak People to take inwardly, or to
heal old Sores, applied thereto._

Take two Gallons of Ale Wort, the strongest you can get, so soon as it
is run from the Grounds, set it on the fire in a Pipkin, and let it boil
gently and that you do perceive it to be as though it were full of Rags;
run it through a strainer, and set it on the fire again, and let it boil
until it be thick, and scum it clean, and when it is much wasted, put it
into a lesser Pan to boil, or else it will burn; when it is thick
enough, take it off, and when it is cold, put it into Gallipots, take as
much as a Walnut fasting; and as much when you go to bed.


54. _To make whipt Sillibub._

Take half a Pint of Rhenish Wine or white Wine, put it into a Pint of
Cream, with the Whites of three Eggs, season it with Sugar, and beat it
as you do Snow-Cream, with Birchen Rods, and take off the Froth as it
ariseth, and put it into your Pot, so do till it be beaten to a Froth,
let it stand two or three hours till it do settle, and then it will eat
finely.


55. _To make Raisin Wine or Stepony._

Take four Gallons of Spring-water, four pounds of Raisins of the Sun
stoned, the juice of four good Limons, and the Rind of two cut thin,
boil the Raisins, and Pill in the Water for half an hour or more, then
put in the juice of Limon, and a little Spice, Sugar and Rosewater, and
let it stand but a little more over the fire; then put it into an
earthen pot, and beat it together till it be cold, then bottle it up, it
will keep but a few days.

_Memorandum_, Two pounds of Sugar to one pound of Cowslips is enough for
Conserve.


56. _To boil Samphire._

Take Water and Salt so strong as will bear an Egg, boil it, and when it
boils, put in your Samphire unwashed, and let it scald a little, then
take it off, and cover it so close that no Air can get in, and set the
Pot upon a cold Wisp of Hay, and so let it stand all night, and it will
be very green, then put it up for your use.


57. _To make Cabbage Cream._

Take twenty five Quarts of new Milk, set it on the fire till it be ready
to boil, stir it all the while that it creams not, then pour it into
twenty several Platters so fast as you can, when it is cold, take off
the Cream with a Skimmer, and lay it on a Pie Plate in the fashion of a
Cabbage, crumpled one upon another, do thus three times, and between
every Layer you must mingle Rosewater and Sugar mingled thick, and laid
on with a Feather; some use to take a little Cream and boil it with
Ginger, then take it from the fire and season it with Rosewater and
Sugar, and the Juice of Jordan Almonds blanched and beaten, then stir it
till it be cold, that it cream not; then take Toasts of Manchet cut
thin, not too hard, nor brown, lay them in the bottom of the Dish, and
pour the Cream upon them, and lay the Cabbage over.


58. _To make a Trifle._

Take sweet Cream, season it with Rosewater and Sugar, and a little whole
Mace, let it boil a while, then take it off, and let it cool, and when
it is lukewarm put it into such little Dishes or Bowls as you mean to
serve it in; then put in a little Runnet, and stir it together; when
you serve it in, strew on some French Comfits.


59. _To make thick Cream._

Take sweet Cream, a little Flower finely searced, large Mace, a stick of
Cinamon, Sugar and Rosewater, let all these boil together till it be
thick, then put into it thick Cream, the yolks of Eggs beaten, then let
it seeth but a little while for fear of turning, then pour it out, and
when it is cold serve it in.


60. _To pickle Purslan to keep all the Year._

Take the Leaves from the stalks, then take the Pot you mean to keep them
in, and strew Salt over the bottom, then lay in a good row of the
Leaves, and strew on more Salt, then lay in a row of the stalks, and put
in more Salt, then a row of the Leaves, so keep it close covered.


61. _To Stretch Sheeps Guts._

After they are clean scowred, lay them in water nine days, shifting them
once a day, and they will be very easie to fill, and when they are
filled, they will come to their wonted bigness.


62. _To make Cream of Pastes and Jellies._

Put Eggs into the Cream as you do for Fool, and slice your Sweet-meats
very thin and boil with them, then sweeten it, and put it into a Dish.


63. _To make a rare Medicine for the Chine-Cough._

Make a Syrrop of Hysop-water and white Sugar Candy, then take the Powder
of Gum Dragon, and as much of white Sugar Candy mixed together, and eat
of it several times of the day, or take the above-named Syrrop, either
of them will do the Cure.


64. _For a Consumption._

Take of Syrrop of Violets, Syrrop of Horehound, Syrrop of Maidenhair and
Conserve of Fox Lungs, of each one ounce, mix them well together, and
take it often upon a Liquoras stick in the day time, and at night.


65. _To make very rare Ale._

When your Ale is tunned into a Vessel that will hold eight or nine
Gallons, and that hath done working, ready to be stopped up, then take
a Pound and half of Raisins of the Sun stoned and cut in pieces, and two
great Oranges, Meat and Rind, and sliced thin, with the Rind of one
Limon, and a few Cloves, one Ounce of Coriander seeds bruised, put all
these in a Bag, and hang them in the Vessel, and stop it up close; when
it hath stood four days, bottle it up, fill the Bottles but a little
above the Neck, and put into every one a Lump of fine Sugar, and stop
them close, and let it be three Weeks or a month before you drink it.


66. _To make Ale to drink within a Week._

Tun it into a Vessel which will hold eight Gallons, and when it hath
done working, ready to bottle, put in some Ginger sliced, and an Orange
stuck with Cloves, and cut here and there with a Knife, and a pound and
half of Sugar, and with a stick stir it well together, and it will work
afresh; when it hath done working, stop it close, and let it stand till
it be clear, then bottle it up and put a Lump of Sugar into every
Bottle, and then stop it close, and knock down the Corks, and turn the
Bottles the Bottoms upwards, and it will be fit to drink in a Weeks
time.


67. _For the Griping in the Guts._

Take a peniworth of Brandy, and a peniworth of Mithridate mixed
together, and drink it three nights together when you go to rest, or
take a little Oil of Aniseeds in a Glass of Sack three times.


68. _To make a Sack Posset._

Take twelve Eggs beaten very well, and put to them a Pint of Sack, stir
them well that they curd not, then put to them three Pints of Cream,
half a Pound of white Sugar, stirring them well together, when they are
hot over the fire, put them into a Bason, and set the Bason over a
boiling pot of water, until the Posset be like a Custard, then take it
off, and when it is cool enough to eat, serve it in with beaten Spice
strewed over it very thick.


69. _To make Pennado._

Take Oatmeal clean picked and well beaten, steep it in water all night,
then strain it and boil it in a Pipkin with some Currans, and a Blade or
two of Mace, and a little Salt; when it is well boiled, take it off, and
put in the Yolks of two or three new laid Eggs beaten with Rosewater,
then set it on a soft fire, and stir it that it curd not, then sweeten
it with Sugar, and put in a little Nutmeg.


70. _To make Cakes without Fruit._

Take four pounds of fine Flower, rub into it one pound of Butter very
well, then take warmed Cream, and temper it with Ale yest, so mix them
together, and make them into a Paste, put in a little Rosewater, and
several Spices well beaten, let it lie by the fire till the Oven heat,
and when you make it up, knead into it half a pound of Caraway Comfits,
and three quarters of a pound of Bisket-Comfits, make it up as fast as
you can, not too thick, nor cut it too deep, put it into a hoop well
butter'd, and wash it over with the White of an Egg, Rosewater, and
Sugar, and strew it with some Comfits; do not bake it too much.


71. _A Sack Posset without Milk._

Take thirteen Eggs and beat them very well, and while they are beating,
take a quart of Sack, half a pound of fine Sugar, and a Pint of Ale, and
let them boil a very little while, then put these Eggs to them, and stir
them till they be hot, then take it from the fire, and keep it stirring
a while, then put it into a fit Bason, and cover it close with a Dish,
then set it over the fire again till it arise to a Curd; then serve it
in with some beaten spice.


72. _A very fine Cordial._

One Ounce of Syrrop of Gilly-flowers, one dram of Confection of
Alkermes, one Ounce and a half of Burrage-water, the like of Mint-water,
one Ounce of Dr. _Mountsford's_ water, as much of Cinamon water mixed
together.


73. _The best way to preserve Goosberries green and whole._

Pick them clean and put them into water as warm as milk, so let them
stand close covered half an hour, then put them into another warm water
and let them stand as long, and so the third time, till you find them
very green; then take their weight in fine Sugar, and make a Syrrop,
then put them in, and let them boil softly one hour; then set them by
till the next day, then heat them again, so do twice, then take them
from that Syrrop and make a new Syrrop and boil them therein, till you
find they be enough.


74. _To make the Orange Pudding._

Take the rind of a small one pared very thin, and boiled in several
waters, and beaten very fine in a Mortar, then put to it four Ounces of
fine Sugar, and four Ounces of fresh Butter, and the Yolks of six Eggs,
and a little Salt, beat it together in the Mortar till the Oven heats,
and so butter a dish and bake it, but not too much; strew Sugar on it
and serve it to the Table, Bake it in Puff-past.


75. _To make French Bread._

Take half a Bushel of fine Flower, ten Eggs, one pound and a half of
fresh Butter, then put in as much Yest as you do into Manchet, temper it
with new milk pretty hot, and let it lie half an hour to rise, then make
it into Loaves or Rolls, and wash it over with an Egg beaten with Milk;
let not your Oven be too hot.


76. _To make a made dish._

Take four Ounces of sweet Almonds blanched, and beaten with Rosewater,
strain them into some Cream, then take Artichoke bottoms boiled tender,
and some boiled Marrow, then boil a quart of Cream with some Rosewater
and Sugar to some thickness, then take it off, and lay your Artichokes
into a Dish, and lay the Marrow on them, then mix your Almond Cream, and
the other together, and poure it over them, and set it on Coals till you
serve it in.


77. _To make a Cake with Almonds._

Take one pound and half of fine Flower, of Sugar twelve Ounces beaten
very fine, mingle them well together, then take half a pound of Almonds
blanched, and beaten with Rosewater, mingle all these with as much Sack
as will work it into a Paste, put in some Spice, some Yest, and some
plumped Currans with some Butter, and a little salt, to make it into a
Cake and bake it.


78. _To make a Sillibub._

Take a Limon pared and sliced very thin, then cover the bottom of your
Sillibub Pot with it, then strew it thick with fine Sugar, then take
Sack or white Wine, and make a Curd with some Milk or Cream, and lay it
on the Limon with a Spoon, then whip some Cream and Whites of Eggs
together, sweetened a little, and cast the Froth thereof upon your
Sillibub, when you lay in your Curd, you must lay Sugar between every
Lay.


79. _To make fine Water-Gruel._

Take the best Oatmeal beaten, and steep it in water all night, the next
day strain it, and boil it with a Blade of Mace, and when it is enough,
put in some Raisins and Currans which have been infused in a Pot (in a
Pot of seething Water) and a little Wine, a little Salt, a little Sugar,
and so eat it.


80. _To make Limon Cream._

Take a quart of Cream, keep it stirring on the fire until it be blood
warm, then take the Meat of three Limons sweetened well with Sugar, and
a little Orange Flower water, sweeten them so well that they may not
turn the Cream, then stir them into the Cream, on the fire with some
yolks of Eggs, and serve it cold; Limon Posset thickned with yolks of
Eggs, makes a fine Cawdle for a sick body.


81. _To make rare Cakes with Almonds._

Take two Pounds and an half of blanched Almonds beaten fine with
Rosewater, mix them with a Pound and three quarters of fine Sugar and
some Musk, and Ambergreece, six Whites of Eggs beaten to a Froth, let
them stand a little, then set them on a Chafing-dish of Coals, and dry
them a little, stirring them all the while, then take half a Peck of
Flower, put into it a little salt, three Pints of Ale-Yest, have in
readiness your Cream lukewarm, strain your Yest, and put into it six
spoonfuls of Sack, put in Spice into your Flower, and make all these
into a stiff Paste with the Cream, work it well and lay it by the fire
to rise one hour, then work into your Paste two pounds and a quarter of
fresh Butter; pull your Paste in pieces three times, then strew in a
pound of Caraway Comfits, and make this Paste into five Cakes, lay them
upon buttered Plates or double Papers, then strew Caraway Comfits on the
top and double refined Sugar; one hour will bake them sufficiently.


82. _To make_ Shrewsbury _Cakes._

Take four pounds of Flower, two pounds of Butter, one pound and an half
of fine Sugar, four Eggs, a little beaten Cinamon, a little Rosewater,
make a hole in the Flower, and put the Eggs into it when they are
beaten, then mix the Butter, Sugar, Cinamon, and Rosewater together, and
then mix them with the Eggs and Flower, then make them into thin round
Cakes, and put them into an Oven after the Houshold Bread is drawn; this
quantity will make three dozen of Cakes.


83. _To make Goosberry Wine._

Bruise ripe Goosberries with an Apple-Beater, but do not beat them too
small, then strain them through a hair strainer, and put your Juice into
an earthen Pot, keep it covered four or five days till it be clear, then
draw it out into another Vessel, letting it run into a hair sieve, stop
it close, and let it stand one fortnight, then draw it out into quart
Bottles, putting one Pound of Sugar into eight Bottles, stop them up
close, and in a week or fortnights time you may drink them.


84. _To make Damson Wine._

Take four Gallons of Water and put to every Gallon of Water four Pounds
of Malaga Raisins, and half a Peck of Damsons.

Put the Raisins and Damsons into a Vessel without a head, cover the
Vessel and let them steep six days, stirring them twice every day; then
let them stand as long without stirring, then draw the Wine out of the
Vessel, and colour it with the infused juice of Damsons sweetened with
Sugar, till it be like Claret Wine, then put it into a Wine-vessel for a
fortnight, and then bottle it up.


85. _To pickle Cucumbers the very best way._

Take those you mean to pickle, and lay them in water and salt three or
four days, then take a good many great Cucumbers, and cut the outsides
of them into water, for the insides will be too pappy, boil them in that
Water, with Dill seeds and Fennel seeds, and when it is cold, put to it
some salt, and as much of Vinegar as will make it a strong Pickle, then
take them out of the Water and Salt, and pour this Liquor over them, so
let them stand close covered for a fortnight or three weeks.

Then pour the Pickle from them and boil it, and when it is cold add to
it some more Vinegar, and put it to them again, so let them stand one
Month longer, and now and then when you see occasion, boil it again, and
when it is cold, put it to them, and every time you boil it, put some
Vinegar thereto, and lay the seeds and pieces of Cucumbers on the top,
and after the first fortnight when you boil it, put in some whole
Pepper and some whole Cloves and Mace, and always put the Liquor cold
over them.


86. _To make the best Orange Marmalade._

Take the Rinds of the deepest coloured Oranges, boil them in several
Waters till they are very tender, then mince them small, and to one
pound of Oranges, take a Pound of Pippins cut small, one Pound of the
finest Sugar, and one Pint of Spring-water, melt your Sugar in the Water
over the fire, and scum it, then put in your Pippins, and boil them till
they are very clear, then put in the Orange Rind, and boil them
together, till you find by cooling a little of it, that it will jelly
very well, then put in the Juice of two Oranges, and one Limmon, and
boil it a little longer; and then put it up in Gally-pots.


87. _To preserve White Quinces._

Take the fairest you can get, and coddle them very tender, so that a
straw may go through to the Core, then core them with a scoop or small
knife, then pare them neatly, and weigh them, to every pound of
Quinces, take one pound of double refined Sugar, and a Pint of the
Water wherein thin slices of Pippins have been boiled; for that is of a
Jellying quality, put your Sugar to the Pippin water, and make a Sirrup,
and scum it, then put in your Quinces, and boil them very quick, and
that will keep them whole and white, take them from the fire sometimes
and shake them gently, keep them clean scummed, when you perceive them
to be very clear, put them into Gally-pots or Glasses, then warm the
Jelly and put it to them.


88. _To make Conserve of Red Roses._

Take their Buds and clip off the Whites, then take three times their
weight in Sugar double refin'd; beat the Roses well in a Mortar, then
put in the Sugar by little and little, and when you find it well
incorporated, put it into Gally-pots, and cover it with Sugar, and so it
will keep seven years.


89. _To make plain Bisket-Cakes._

Take a Pottle of Flower, and put to it half a pound of fine Sugar, half
an Ounce of Caraway seeds, half an Ounce of Anniseeds, six spoonfuls of
Yest, then boil a Pint of Water or little more, put into it a quarter
of a Pound of Butter or a little more, let it stand till it be cold,
then temper them together till it be as thick as Manchet, then let it
lie a while to rise, so roul them out very thin, and prick them, and
bake them in an Oven not too hot.


90. _To make Green Paste of Pippins._

Take your Pippins while they be green, and coddle them tender, then peel
them, and put them into a fresh warm Water, and cover them close, till
they are as green as you desire. Then take the Pulp from the Core, and
beat it very fine in a Mortar, then take the weight in Sugar, and wet it
with Water, and boil it to a Candy height, then put in your Pulp, and
boil them together till it will come from the bottom of the Skillet,
then make it into what form you please, and keep them in a stove.


91. _To make Paste of any Plumbs._

Take your Plumbs, and put them into a Pot, cover them close, and set
them into a Pot of seething Water, and so let them be till they be
tender, then pour forth their Liquor, and strain the Pulp through a
Canvas strainer, then take to half a Pound of the Pulp of Plumbs half a
Pound of the Pulp of Pippins, beat them together, and take their weight
in fine Sugar, with as much Water as will wet it, and boil it to a Candy
height; then put in your Pulp, and boil them together till it will come
from the bottom of the Posnet, then dust your Plates with searced Sugar,
and so keep them in a Stove to dry.


92. _To make Almond Ginger-Bread._

Take a little Gum-Dragon and lay it in steep in Rosewater all night,
then take half a Pound of Jordan Almonds blanched and beaten with some
of that Rosewater, then take half a pound of fine Sugar beaten and
searced, of Ginger and Cinamon finely searced, so much as by your taste
you may judge to be fit; beat all these together into a Paste, and dry
it in a warm Oven or Stove.


93. _To make Snow Cream._

Take a Pint of Cream, and the Whites of three Eggs, one spoonful or two
of Rosewater, whip it to a Froth with a Birchen Rod, then cast it off
the Rod into a Dish, in the which you have first fastened half a Manchet
with some Butter on the bottom, and a long Rosemary sprig in the
middle; when you have all cast the Snow on the dish, then garnish it
with several sorts of sweet-meats.


94. _To preserve Oranges and Limons that they shall have a Rock Candy on
them in the Syrrup._

Take the fairest and cut them in halves, or if you will do them whole,
then cut a little hole in the bottom, so that you may take out all the
meat, lay them in water nine days, shifting them twice every day, then
boil them in several Waters, till a straw will run through them, then
take to every Pound of Orange or Limon one Pound of fine Sugar, and one
quart of Water, make your Syrrup, and let your Oranges or Limons boil a
while in it, then let them stand five or six days in that Syrrup, then
to every Pound, put one Pound more of Sugar into your Syrrup, and boil
your Oranges till they be very clear, then take your Oranges out, and
boil your Syrrup almost to Candy, and put to them.


95. _To make Sugar Plate._

Take a little Gum-Dragon laid in steep in Rosewater till it be like
Starch, then beat it in a Mortar with some searced Sugar till it come
to a perfect Paste, then mould it with Sugar, and make it into what form
you please, and colour some of them, lay them in a warm place, and they
will dry of themselves.


96. _To make Artificial Walnuts._

Take some of your Sugar Plate, print it in a Mould fit for a Walnut
Kernel, yellow it over with a little Saffron, then take searced Cinamon
and Sugar, as much of the one as the other, work it in Paste with some
Rosewater, wherein Gum Dragon hath been steeped, and print it in a Mould
for a Walnut shell, and when they are dry, close them together over the
shell with a little of the Gum water.


97. _To make short Cakes._

Take a Pint of Ale Yest, and a Pound and half of fresh Butter, melt your
Butter, and let it cool a little, then take as much fine Flower as you
think will serve, mingle it with the Butter and Yest, and as much
Rosewater and Sugar as you think fit, and if you please, some Caraway
Comfits, so bake it in little Cakes; they will last good half a year.


98. _To preserve red Roses, which is as good and effectual as any
Conserve, and made with less trouble._

Take Red Rose Buds clipped clean from their Whites one pound, put them
into a Skillet with four Quarts of Water, Wine measure, then let them
boil very fast till three Quarts be boiled away, then put in three
pounds of fine Sugar, and let it boil till it begins to be thick, then
put in the Juice of a Limon, and boil it a little longer, and when it is
almost cold, put it into Gally-Pots, and strew them over with searced
Sugar, and so keep them so long as you please, the longer the better.


99. _A fine Cordial Infusion._

Take the flesh of a Cock Chick cut in small pieces, and put into a Glass
with a wide Mouth, put to it one Ounce of Harts-horn, half an Ounce of
Red Coral prepared, with a little large Mace, and a slice or two of
Limon, and two Ounces of White Sugar-Candy, stop the Glass close with a
Cork, and set it into a Vessel of seething Water, and stuff it round
with Hay that it jog not; when you find it to be enough, give the sick
Party two spoonfuls at a time.



100. _For a Cough of the Lungs._

Take two Ounces of Oil of sweet Almonds newly drawn, three spoonfuls of
Colts-foot Water, two spoonfuls of Red Rose-Water, two Ounces of white
Sugar-Candy finely beaten; mingle all these together, and beat it one
hour with a spoon, till it be very white; then take it often upon a
Licoras stick. This is very good.


101. _To preserve Grapes._

Take your fairest white Grapes and pick them from the stalks, then stone
them carefully, and save the Juice, then take a pound of Grapes, a pound
of fine Sugar, and a pint of water wherein sliced Pippins have been
boiled, strain that water, and with your Sugar and that make a Syrup,
when it is well scummed put in your Grapes, and boil them very fast, and
when you see they are as clear as glass, and that the Syrup will jelly,
put them into Glasses.


102. _To make Collops of Bacon in Sweet-meats._

Take some Marchpane Paste, and the weight thereof in fine Sugar beaten
and searsed, boil them on the fire, and keep them stirring for fear
they burn, so do till you find it will come from the bottom of the
Posnet, then mould it with fine Sugar like a Paste, and colour some of
it with beaten Cinnamon, and put in a little Ginger, then roll it broad
and thin, and lay one upon another till you think it be of a fit
thickness and cut it in Collops and dry it in an Oven.


103. _To make Violet Cakes._

Take them clipped clean from the whites and their weight in fine Sugar,
wet your Sugar in fair water, and boil it to a Candy height, then put in
your Violets, and stir them well together, with a few drops of a Limon,
then pour them upon a wet Pye-Plate, or on a slicked paper, and cut them
in what form you please; do not let them boil, for that will spoil the
colour: Thus you may do with any Herb or Flower, or with any Orange or
Limon Pill, and, if you like it, put in a little Musk or Ambergreece.


104. _To preserve white Damsons._

Take to every pound one pound of fine Sugar and a quarter of a pint of
fair water, make your Syrup and scum it well, then take it from the
fire, and when it is almost cold put in your Damsons, and let them
scald a little, then take them off a while, and then set them on again;
when you perceive them to be very clear, put them into Pots or Glasses.


105. _To make a very good Cake._

Take a peck of Flower, four pound of Currans well washed, dryed and
picked, four pounds of Butter, one pound of Sugar, one ounce of
Cinnamon, one ounce of Nutmegs, beat the Spice and lay it all night in
Rosewater, the next day strain it out, then take one pint and an half of
good Ale-Yest the Yolks of 4 Eggs, a pint of Cream, put a pound of the
butter into the warmed Cream, put the rest into the Flower in pieces,
then wet your Flower with your Cream, and put in your Currans, and a
little Salt, and four or five spoonfuls of Caraway-Comfits and your
Spice, mix them all and the Yest well together, and let it lie one hour
to rise, then make it up and Bake it in a Pan buttered: It may stand two
hours.


106. _To make Paste Royal._

Take Quince Marmalade almost cold, and mould it up with searced Sugar to
a Paste, them make it into what form you please and dry them in a Stove.



107. _To make Paste of Pippins coloured with Barberries._

Take the Pulp of Codled Pippins, and as much of the Juice of Barberries
as will colour it, then take the weight of it in fine Sugar, boil it to
a Candy height, with a little water, then put in your Pulp beaten very
well in a mortar, boil it till it come from the bottom of the Posnet,
then dust your Plate with Sugar, and drop them thereon, and dry them in
a Stove or warm Oven.


108. _To preserve Barberries._

Take one Pound of stoned Barberries and twice their weight in fine
Sugar, then strip two or three handfuls of Barberries from their stalks,
and put them into a Dish with as much Sugar as Barberries, over a
Chafing dish of Coals, when you see they are well plumped, strain them,
then wet your other Sugar with this, and no Water, boil it and scum it,
and then put in your stoned Barberries, and boil them till they are very
clear.


109. _To make Jelly of Currans or of any other Fruit._

Take your Fruit clean picked from the stalks, and put them into a long
Gally-pot, and set it into a Kettle of Water close covered; keep the
Water boiling till you find the Fruit be well infused, then pour out the
clearest, and take the weight of it in fine Sugar, wet your Sugar with
Water, and boil it to a Candy height, then put in your clear Liquor, and
keep it stirring over a slow fire till you see it will jelly, but do not
let it boil; the Pulp which is left of the Liquor, you may make Paste of
if you please, as you do the Pippin Paste before named.


110. _To make a Goosberry Fool._

Take a Pint and an half of Goosberries clean picked from the stalks, put
them into a Skillet with a Pint and half of fair Water, scald them till
they be very tender, then bruise them well in the Water, and boil them
with a Pound and half of fine Sugar till it be of a good thickness, then
put to it the Yolks of six Eggs and a Pint of Cream, with a Nutmeg
quartered, stir these well together till you think they be enough, over
a slow fire, and put it into a Dish, and when it is cold, eat it.


111. _To make perfumed Lozenges._

Take twelve Grains of Ambergreece, and six grains of Musk, and beat it
with some Sugar plate spoken of before, then roule it out in thin Cakes,
and make them into what form you please, you may make them round like a
Sugar Plumb, and put a Coriander seed in each of them, and so they will
be fine Comfits, and you may make them into Lozenges to perfume Wine
with.


112. _To Candy Eryngo Roots._

Take the Roots new gathered, without Knots or Joints, wash them clean,
and boil them in several Waters till they are very tender, then wash
them well, and dry them in a Cloth, slit them, and take out the Pith,
and braid them in Braids as you would a Womans Hair, or else twist them,
then take twice their weight in fine Sugar, take half that Sugar, and to
every Pound of Sugar, one quarter of a pint of Rosewater and as much
fair water, make a syrup of it, and put in your roots and boil them, and
when they are very clear, wet the rest of the Sugar with Rosewater, and
boil it to a Candy height, then put in the Roots and boil them, and
shake them, and when they be enough, take them off, and shake them till
they are cold and dry, then lay them upon Dishes or Plates till they are
throughly dry, and then put them up; thus you may do Orange or Limon, or
Citron Pill, or Potato Roots.


113. _To preserve Goosberries._

Take your Gooseberries, and stone them, then take a little more than
their weight in fine Sugar, then with as much Water as will melt the
Sugar, boil it and scum it, then put in your Goosberries, and boil them
apace till they be clear, then take up your Goosberries, and put them
into Glasses, and boil the Syrup a little more, and put over them.


114. _To make Leach and to colour it._

Take one Ounce of Isinglass and lay it in Water four and twenty hours,
changing the Water three or four times, then take a quart of new Milk,
boiled with a little sliced Ginger and a stick of Cinamon, one spoonful
of Rosewater, and a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, when it hath boiled a
while, put in the Isinglass, and boil it till it be thick, keeping it
always stirring, then strain it, and keep it stirring, and when it is
cold, you may slice it out, and serve it upon Plates; you may colour it
with Saffron, and some with Turnsole, and lay the White and that one
upon another, and cut it, and it will look like Bacon; it is good for
weak people, and Children that have the Rickets.


115. _To take away the Signs of the Small Pox._

Take some Spercma-ceti, and twice so much Virgins Wax, melt them
together and spread it upon Kids Leather, in the shape of Mask, then lay
it upon the Face, and keep it on night and day, it is a very fine
Remedy.


116. _For Morphew, or Freckles, and to clear the Skin._

Take the Blood of any Fowl or Beast, and wipe your Face all over with it
every night when you go to bed for a fortnight together, and the next
day wash it all off with White Wine, and white Sugar Candy, and
sometimes hold your face over the smoke of Brimstone for a while, and
shut your eyes, if you add the Juice of a Limon to the white Wine, it
will be the better.


117. _To make Almond Butter to look white._

Take about two Quarts of Water, the bottom of a Manchet, and a Blade of
large Mace, boil it half an hour, and let it stand till it be cold, then
take a Pound of sweet Almonds blanched, and beaten with Rosewater very
fine, so strain them with this Water many times, till you think the
virtue is out of them, and that it be a thick Almond Milk, then put it
into a Skillet, and make it boiling hot, that it simper, then take a
spoonful of the Juice of a Limon, and put into it, stirring of it in,
and when you perceive it ready to turn, then take it from the fire, and
take a large fine Cloth, and cast your Liquor all over the Cloth with a
Ladle, then scrape it altogether into the middle with a Spoon, then tie
it hard with a Packthred, so let it hang till the next morning, then put
in a Dish, and sweeten it with Rosewater and Sugar, put a little
Ambergreece if you please.


118. _For the Ptisick._

Take a Pottle of small Ale, one Pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned, with
a little handful of Peniroyal, boil these together, and add a little
Sugar-candy to it, and take five or six spoonfuls at a time four or five
times in a day for a good while.


119. _Marmalade of Apricocks._

Take the ripest and stone them and pare them, and beat them in a Mortar,
then boil the Pulp in a Dish over a Chafing-dish of Coals, till it be
somewhat dry, then take the weight in fine Sugar, and boil it to a Candy
height, with some Rosewater, then put in your Pulp, and boil them
together till it will come from the bottom of the Skillet, and always
keep it stirring, for fear it burn, then put it into Glasses.


120. _Syrup of Turneps._

Take of the best and pare them, and bake them in a Pot, then take the
clear Juice from them, and with the like weight in fine Sugar make it
into a Syrup, and a little Licoras to it, and take it often.


121. _To make a good Jelly._

Take a lean Pig, dress it clean, and boil it in a sufficient quantity of
Fair Water, with four Ounces of green Licoras scraped and bruised,
Maidenhair two handfuls, Colts-foot one handful, Currans half a Pound,
Dates two Ounces stoned and sliced, Ivory one Ounce, Hartshorn one
Ounce, boil these to a strong Jelly, and strain it, and take off the
Fat, then put to it half a Pound of Sugar, and half a Pint of white
Wine, and so eat it at your pleasure.


122. _A most excellent Cordial proved by very many._

Take three Grains of East Indian Bezoar, as much of Ambergreece, powder
them very fine with a little Sugar, and mingle it with a spoonful and
half of the Syrup of the juice of Citrons, one Spoonful of Syrup of
Clovegilliflowers, and one spoonful of Cinamon Water, so take it warmed.


123. _To make the black Juice of Licoras._

Take two Gallons of running Water, three handfuls of unset Hysop, three
pounds and half of Licoras scraped, and dried in the Sun and beaten,
then cover it close, and boil it almost a whole day in the Water, when
it is enough, it will be as thick as Cream, then let it stand all night,
the next morning strain it, and put it in several Pans in the Sun to
dry, till it work like wax, then mould it with White Sugar Candy beaten
and searced, then print it in little Cakes, and print them with Seals,
and dry them.


124. _To make Marchpane._

Take two Pounds of Jordan Almonds, blanch and beat them in a Mortar with
Rosewater, then take one Pound and half of Sugar finely searced, when
the Almonds are beaten to a fine Paste with the Sugar, then, take it out
of the Mortar, and mould it with searced Sugar, and let it stand one
hour to cool, then roll it as thin as you would do for a Tart, and cut
it round by the Plate, then set an edge about it, and pinch it, then set
it on a bottom of Wafers, and bake it a little, then Ice it with
Rosewater and Sugar, and the White of an Egg beaten together, and put it
into the Oven again, and when you see the Ice rise white and high, take
it out, and set up a long piece of Marchpane first baked in the middle
of the Marchpane, stick it with several sorts of Comfits, then lay on
Leaf-gold with a Feather and the White of an Egg beaten.


125. _To preserve Green Pippins._

Scald some green Pippins carefully, then peel them, and put them into
warm water, and cover them, and let them stand over a slow fire till
they are as green as you would have them, and so tender as that a straw
may run through them, then to every pound of Apples, take one pound of
fine Sugar, and half a pint of water, of which make a Syrup, and when
you have scumm'd it clean, put in your Apples, and let them boil a
while, then set them by till the next day, then boil them throughly, and
put them up.


126. _To preserve Peaches._

Take your Peaches when you may prick a hole through them, scald them in
fair water and rub the Fur off from them with your Thumb, then put them
in another warm water over a slow fire, and cover them till they be
green, then take their weight in fine Sugar and a little water, boil it
and scum it, then put in your Peaches, and boil them till they are
clear, so you may do green Plumbs or green Apricocks.


127. _Marmalade of Damsons._

Take two Pounds of Damsons, and one Pound of Pippins pared and cut in
pieces, bake them in an Oven with a little sliced Ginger, when they are
tender, poure them into a Cullender, and let the Syrup drop from them,
then strain them, and take as much sugar as the Pulp doth weigh, boil it
to a Candy height with a little water, then put in your Pulp, and boil
it till it will come from the bottom of the Skillet, and so put it up.


128. _Marmalade of Wardens._

Bake them in an earthen pot, then cut them from the Core and beat them
in a Mortar, then take their weight in fine Sugar, and boil it to a
Candy height with a little beaten Ginger, and boil it till it comes from
the bottom of the Posnet; and so do with Quinces if you please.


129. _Marmalade of green Pippins to look green._

Scald them as you do to preserve, then stamp them in a Mortar, and take
their weight in fine Sugar, boil it to a Candy height with a little
water, then boil it and the Pulp together, till it will come from the
bottom of Posnet.


130. _To preserve green Walnuts._

Take them and steep them all night in water, in the morning pare them
and boil them in fair water till they be tender, and then stick a Clove
into the head of each of them, then take one Pound and half of Sugar to
every pound of Walnuts, and to every pound of Sugar one Pint of
Rosewater, make a Syrup of it, and scum it, then put in your Walnuts,
and boil them very leasurely till they are enough; then put in a little
Musk or Ambergreece with a little Rosewater, and boil them a little
more, and put them up; it is a very good Cordial, and will keep seven
years or more.


131. _To dry old Pippins._

Pare them, and bore a hole through them with a little Knife or Piercer,
and cut some of them in halves, take out the Cores of them as you cut
them, then put them into a Syrup of Sugar and water, as much as will
cover them in a broad preserving Pan, let them boil so fast as may be;
taking them sometimes from the fire, scumming them clean; when you
perceive your Apples clear, and Syrup thick, then take them up, and set
them into a warm Oven from the Syrup, all night, the next morning turn
them, and put them in again, so do till they are dry; if you please to
glister some of them, put them into your Candy-pot but one night, and
lay them to dry the next day, and they will look like Crystal.


132. _To preserve Bullace as green as grass._

Take them fresh gathered, and prick them in several places, scald them
as you do your green Peaches, then take their weight in fine sugar, and
make a Syrup with a little water, then put in your Bullace, and boil
them till they be very clear, and the Syrup very thick.


133. _To preserve Medlars._

Take them at their full growth, pare them as thin as you can, prick them
with your Knife, and parboil them reasonable tender, then dry them with
a Cloth, and put to them as much clarified sugar as will cover them; let
them boil leisurely, turning them often, till they have well taken the
sugar, then put them into an earthen Pot, and let them stand till the
next day, then warm them again half an hour; then take them up and lay
them to drain, then put into that Syrup half a pint of water wherein
Pippins have been boiled in slices, and a quarter of a Pound of fresh
sugar, boil it, and when it will jelly, put it to the Medlars in
Gallipots or Glasses.


134. _To make Conserve of Violets._

Take a pound clean cut from the whites, stamp them well in a Mortar, and
put to them two or three Ounces of white Sugar-Candy, then take it out
and lay it upon a sleeked Paper, then take their weight in fine sugar,
and boil it to a Candy height with a little water, then put in your
Violets, and a little Juice of Limon, and then let them have but one
walm or two over the fire, stirring it well; then take it off; and when
it is between hot and cold, put it up, and keep it.


135. _To cast all kinds of shapes, what you please, and to colour them._

Take half a pound of refined Sugar, boil it to a Candy height with as
much Rosewater as will melt it, then take moulds made of Alabaster, and
lay them in water one hour before you put in the hot Sugar, then when
you have put in your Sugar turn the mould about in your hand till it be
cool, then take it out of the mould, and colour it according to the
nature of the Fruit you would have it resemble.


136. _To dry Pears without Sugar._

Pare them, and leave the stalks and pipps on them, then bake them in an
earthen pot with a little Claret Wine, covered, then drain them from the
Syrup, and dry them upon Sieves in a warm Oven, turning them morning and
evening, every time you turn them hold them by the stalk and dip them in
the Liquor wherein they were baked and flat them every time a little.

If you do them carefully they will look very red and clear and eat
moist, when they are dry put them up.


137. _To make Rasberry Wine._

Take Rasberries and bruise them with the back of a spoon, and strain
them, and fill a bottle with the juyce, stop it, but not very close, let
it stand four or five days, then pour it from the Grounds into a Bason,
and put as much White-wine or Rhenish as your juyce will well colour,
then sweeten it with Loaf Sugar, then bottle it and keep it, and when
you drink it you may perfume some of it with one of the Lozenges spoken
of before.


138. _To preserve Oranges in jelly._

Take the thickest rind Oranges, chipped very thin, lay them in water
three or four days, shifting them twice every day, then boil them in
several waters, till you may run a straw through them, then let them lye
in a Pan of water all night, then dry them gently in a Cloth, then take
to every Pound of Oranges one Pound and an half of Sugar, and a Pint of
water, make thereof a syrup; then put in your Oranges, and boil them a
little, then set them by till the next day, and boil them again a
little, and so do for four or five days together, then boil them till
they are very clear, then drain them in a sieve, then take to every
Pound of Oranges one quarter of a Pint of water wherein sliced Pippins
have been boiled into your syrup, and to every quarter of a Pint of that
water, add a quarter of a Pound of fresh Sugar, boil it till it will
jelly, then put your Oranges into a Pot or a Glass, and put the jelly
over them; you may if you please, take all the Meat out of some of your
Oranges at one end, and fill it with preserved Pippin, and if you put in
a little Juice of Orange and Limon into your Syrup when it is almost
boiled, it will be very fine tasted.


138. [Transcriber's note: so numbered in original] _To make Cristal
Jelly._

Take a Knuckle of Veal and two Calves Feet, lay them in water all night,
then boil them in Spring water, till you perceive it to be a thick
Jelly, then take them out, and let your Jelly stand till it be cold,
then take the clearest, and put it into a Skillet, and sweeten it with
Rosewater and fine Sugar, and a little whole Spice, and boil them
together a little, and so eat it when it is cold.


139. _To make_ China-_Broth._

Take three Ounces of _China_ sliced thin, and three Pints of fair water,
half an ounce of Harts-horn, let it steep together twelve hours, then
put in a Red Cock cut in pieces and bruised, one Ounce of Raisins of the
Sun stoned, one ounce of Currans, one ounce of Dates stoned, one Parsley
root, one Fennel-root, the Pith being taken out, a little Burrage and
Bugloss, and a little Pimpernel, two Ounces of Pearl Barley; boil all
these together till you think they be well boiled, then strain it out.


140. _To make Court Perfumes._

Take three Ounces of Benjamin, lay it all night in Damask Rose buds
clean cut from the white, beat them very fine in a stone Mortar till it
come to a Paste, then take it out and mix it with a dram of Musk finely
beaten, as much Civet, mould them up with a little searced Sugar, and
dry them between Rose Leaves each of them, then dry them very well and
keep them to burn, one at a time is sufficient.


141. _A Syrup for a Cold._

Take Long-wort of the Oak, Sage of _Jerusalem_, Hysop, Colts-foot,
Maidenhair, Scabious, Horehound, one handful of each, four Ounces of
Licoras scraped, two Ounces of Anniseeds bruised, half a pound of
Raisins of the Sun stoned, put these together into a Pipkin with two
quarts of Spring water, let them stand all night to infuse close
stopped, when it is half boiled away, strain it out, and put to it to
every pint of liquor a pound of Sugar and boil it to a Syrup.


142. _To make white Marmalade of Quinces._

Coddle them so tender that a straw may run thorow them, then take grated
Quinces and strain the Juice from them, then slice your scalded Quinces
thin and weigh them, and take a little above their weight in fine Sugar,
wet your Sugar with the raw juice, boil it and scum it, then put in your
sliced Quinces and boil them up quick till they jelly, then put them
into Glasses.


143. _The white juice of Licoras._

Take one pound of Licoras clean scraped, cut it thin and short, and dry
it in an Oven, then beat it fine in a Mortar, then put it into a stone
Jugg, and put thereto of the water of Colts-foot, Scabius, Hysop and
Horehound, as much as will stand four fingers deep above the Licoras,
then set this Jugg, close stopped, into a Kettle of water, and keep the
water boiling, let it be stuffed round with hay that it jog not, let it
stand so four hours, and so do every other day for the space of ten
days; then strain it into a dish, set the dish over boiling water, and
let it vapour away till it be thick, then add to it one pound of fine
Sugar-Candy, the best and whitest you can get, beaten very well, then
put it into several dishes and dry it in the Sun, or in a warm Oven,
beating it often with bone knives till it be stiff, then take as much
Gum Dragon steeped in Rose-water as will make it pliable to your hand,
then make it into little Rolls, and add two grains of Musk or
Ambergreece and a few drops of Oyl of Anniseed, and so make them into
little Cakes, and print them with a Seal and then dry them.


144. _To dry Plumbs naturally._

Take of any sort and prick them and put them into the bottom of a Sieve
dusted with Flower to keep them from sticking, let them stand in a warm
Oven all night, the next morning turn them upon a clean Sieve, and so do
every day till you see that they are very dry.


145. _To dry preserved Pears._

Wash them from their Syrup, then take some fine Sugar and boil it to a
Candy height with a little water, then put in your Pears, and shake them
very well up and down, then lay them upon the bottom of a Sieve, and dry
them in a warm Oven and so keep them.


146. _To make little Cakes with Almonds._

Put into a little Rosewater two grains of Ambergreece, then take a pound
of blanched Almonds and beat them with this Rosewater, then take a Pound
of your finest Sugar, beaten and searced, and when your Almonds are well
beaten, mix some of the Sugar with them, then make your Cakes, and lay
them on Wafer sheets; and when they are half baked, take the rest of the
Sugar, being boiled to a Candy height with a little Rosewater, and so
with a Feather wash them over with this, and let them stand a while
longer.


147. _To make very pretty Cakes that will keep a good while._

Take a Quart of fine Flower and the yolks of 4 Eggs, a quarter of a
pound of Sugar, and a little Rosewater, with some beaten Spice, and as
much Cream as will work it into a Paste, work it very well and beat it,
then rowl it as thin as possible, and cut them round with a Spur, such
as the Pastry Cooks do use; then fill them with Currans first plumped a
little in Rosewater and Sugar, so put another sheet of Paste over them
and close them, prick them, and bake them but let not your Oven be too
hot; you may colour some of them with Saffron if you please, and some of
them you may ice over with Rosewater and Sugar, and the White of an Egg
beaten together.


148. _To make a Paste to wash your hands withal._

Take a Pound of bitter Almonds, blanch them and beat them very fine in a
Mortar with four Ounces of Figgs, when it is come to a paste, put it
into a Gallipot and keep it for your use; a little at a time will serve.


149. _To keep Flowers all the Year._

Take any sort of pretty Flowers you can get, and have in readiness some
Rosewater made very slippery by laying Gum Arabick therein.

Dip your Flowers very well, and swing it out again, and stick them in a
sieve to dry in the Sun, some other of them you may dust over with fine
Flower, and some with searced Sugar, after you have wetted them, and so
dry them.

Either of them will be very fine, but those with Sugar will not keep so
well as the other; they are good to set forth Banquets, and to garnish
Dishes, and will look very fresh, and have their right smell.


150. _Conserve of Barberries._

Take Barberries, infuse them in a pot as other Fruits spoken of before,
then strain them, and to every pound of liquor take two pounds of Sugar,
boil them together over the fire till it will come from the bottom of
the Posnet, and then put it into Gally-pots and keep it with fine Sugar
strewed over it.


151. _To preserve Barberries without Fire._

Take your fairest bunches and lay a Lay of fine Sugar into the bottom of
the pot, and then a Lay of Barberries, and then Sugar again, till all be
in, and be sure to cover them deep with Sugar last of all, and cover
your pot with a bladder wet and tyed on, that no Air get in, and they
will keep and be good, and much better to garnish dishes with than
pickled Barberries, and are very pleasant to eat.


152. _To Candy Almonds to look as though they had their Shells on._

Take Jordan Almonds and blanch them, then take fine Sugar, wet it with
water, and boil it to a Candy height, colour it with Cochineal, and put
in a grain of Ambergreece; when you see it at a Candy height, put in
your Almonds well dried from the Water, and shake them over the fire
till you see they are enough, then lay them in a Stove or some other
warm place.


153. _To Candy Carrot Roots._

Take of the best and Boil them tender then pare them, and cut them in
such pieces as you like; then take fine Sugar boiled to a Candy height
with a little Water, then put in your Roots, and boil them till you see
they will Candy; but you must first boil them with their weight in Sugar
and some Water, or else they will not be sweet enough; when they are
enough, lay them into a Box, and keep them dry: thus you may do green
Peascods when they are very young, if you put them into boiling water,
and let them boil close covered till they are green, and then boiled in
a Syrup, and then the Candy, they will look very finely, and are good
to set forth Banquets, but have no pleasant taste.


154. _To make Syrup of Violets._

Take Violets clipped clean from the Whites, to every Ounce of Violets
take two Ounces of Water, so steep them upon Embers till the Water be as
blew as a Violet, and the Violets turned white, then put in more Violets
into the same Water, and again the third time, then take to every Quart
of Water four Pounds of fine Sugar, and boil it to a Syrup, and keep it
for your use; thus you may also make Syrup of Roses.


155. _To make a Syrup for any Cough._

Take four Ounces of Licoras scraped and bruised, Maidenhair one Ounce,
Aniseeds half an Ounce, steep them in Spring water half a day, then boil
it half away; the first quantity of water which you steep them in must
be four Pints, and when it is half boiled away, then add to it one Pound
of fine Sugar, and boil it to a Syrup, and take two spoonfuls at a time
every night when you go to rest.


156. _A pretty Sweet-meat with Roses and Almonds._

Take half a Pound of Blanched Almonds beaten very fine with a little
Rosewater, two Ounces of the Leaves of Damask Roses beaten fine, then
take half a pound of Sugar, and a little more, wet it with water, and
boil it to a Candy height, then put in your Almonds and Roses, and a
grain of Musk or Ambergreece, and let them boil a little while together,
and then put it into Glasses, and it will be a fine sort of Marmalade.


157. _The best sort of Hartshorn Jelly to serve in a Banquet._

Take six Ounces of Hartshorn, put it into two Quarts of Water and let it
infuse upon Embers all night, then boil it up quick, and when you find
by the Spoon you stir it with, that it will stick to your mouth, if you
do touch it, and that you find the Water to be much wasted, strain it
out, and put in a little more than half a Pound of fine Sugar, a little
Rosewater, a Blade of Mace, and a Stick of Cinamon, the Juice of as many
Limons will give it a good taste, with two Grains of Ambergreece, set
it over a slow fire, and do not let it boil, but when you find it to be
very thick in your mouth, then put it softly into Glasses; and set it
into a Stove, and that will make it to jelly the better.


158. _To make Orange or Limon Chips._

Take the parings of either of these cut thin, and boil them in several
waters till they be tender, then let them lie in cold water a while,
then take their weight in Sugar or more, and with as much water as will
wet it, boil it and scum it, then drain your Chips from the cold water,
and put them into a Gally-pot; and pour this Syrup boiling hot upon
them, so let them stand till the next day, then heat the Syrup again and
pour over them, so do till you see they are very clear, every day do so
till the Syrup be very thick, and then lay them out in a Stove to dry.


159. _To make Cakes of Almonds in thin slices._

Take four Ounces of Jordan Almonds, blanch them in cold water, and slice
them thin the long way, then mix them with little thin pieces of Candied
Orange and Citron Pill, then take some fine Sugar boiled to a Candy
height with some water, put in your Almonds, and let them boil till you
perceive they will Candy, then with a spoon take them out, and lay them
in little Lumps upon a Pie-plate or sleeked Paper, and before they be
quite cold strew Caraway Comfits on them, and so keep them very dry.


160. _To make Chips of any Fruit._

Take any preserved Fruit, drain it from the syrup, and cut it thin, then
boil Sugar to a Candy height, and then put your Chips therein, and shake
them up and down till you see they will Candy, and then lay them out; or
take raw Chips of Fruit boiled first in Syrup, and then a Candy boiled,
and put over them hot, and so every day, till they begin to sparkle as
they lie, then take them out, and dry them.


161. _To preserve sweet Limons._

Take the fairest, and chip them thin, and put them into cold water as
you chip them, then boil them in several waters till a straw may run
through them, then to every pound of limon, take a pound and half of
fine Sugar, and a pint of water, boil it together, and scum it, then
let your Limons scald in it a little, and set them by till the next day,
and every other day heat the syrup only and put to them; so do 9 times,
and then at last boil them in the Syrup till they be clear, then take
them out, and put them into Pots, and boil the Syrup a little more, and
put to them; if you will have them in Jelly, make your Syrup with Pippin
water.


162. _To make a Custard for a Consumption._

Take four Quarts of Red Cows Milk, four Ounces of Conserve of Red Roses,
prepared Pearl, prepared Coral, and white Amber, of each one Dram, two
Ounces of white Sugar Candy, one grain of Ambergreece, put these into an
earthen pot with some leaf gold, and the yolks and whites of twelve
Eggs, a little Mace and Cinamon, and as much fine Sugar as will sweeten
it well; Paste the Pot over and bake it with brown Bread, and eat of it
every day so long as it will last.


163. _To make Chaculato._

Take half a Pint of Claret Wine, boil it a little, then scrape some
Chaculato very fine and put into it, and the Yolks of two Eggs, stir
them well together over a slow Fire till it be thick, and sweeten it
with Sugar according to your taste.


164. _To dry any Sort of Plumbs._

Take to every pound of Plumbs three quarters of a pound of Sugar, boil
it to a Candy height with a little water, then put in your Plumbs ready
stoned, and let them boil very gently over a slow fire, if they be white
ones they may boil a little faster, then let them by till the next day,
then boil them well, and take them often from the fire for fear of
breaking, let them lie in their Syrup for four or five days, then lay
them out upon Sieves to dry, in a warm Oven or Stove, turning them upon
clean Sieves twice every day, and fill up all the broken places, and put
the skins over them, when they are dry, wash off the clamminess of them
with warm water, and dry them in the Oven, and they will look as though
the dew were upon them.


165. _To make Jelly of Quinces._

Take your Quinces, pare them and core them, and cut them in quarters,
then put them into a new earthen pot with a narrow mouth, put in some
of the cores in the bottom, and then the Quinces, paste it up and bake
it with brown Bread, then run it thorough a bagg of boulting stuff as
fast as you can, and crush it pretty hard, so long as it will run clear,
to every pound of it take a pound of fine Sugar, and put into it, and
let it stand till it be dissolved, then set it over a slow fire, and
scum it well, and keep it stirring till it jelly, then put it into
Glasses and keep it in a stove.


166. _To make a Posset._

Take a Quart of White-wine and a quart of Water, boil whole Spice in
them, then take twelve Eggs and put away half the Whites, beat them very
well, and take the Wine from the fire, then put in your Eggs and stir
them very well, then set it on a slow fire, and stir it till it be
thick, sweeten it with Sugar, and strew beaten Spice thereon, then serve
it in.

You may put in Ambergreece if you like it, or one perfumed Lozenge.


167. _To make a Sack Posset._

Take two quarts of Cream and boil it with Whole Spice, then take twelve
Eggs well beaten and drained, take the Cream from the fire, and stir in
the Eggs, and as much Sugar as will sweeten it, then put in so much Sack
as will make it taste well, and set it on the fire again, and let it
stand a while, then take a Ladle and raise it up gently from the bottom
of the Skillet you make it in, and break it as little as you can, and so
do till you see it be thick enough; then put it into a Bason with the
Ladle gently; if you do it too much it will whey, and that is not good.


168. _Another way for a Posset._

Boil a Quart of Cream as for the other, then take the Yolks of fourteen
Eggs and four Whites, beat them and strain them, take the Cream from the
fire, and stir in your Eggs, then have your Sack warmed in a Bason, and
when the Cream and Eggs are well mixed, put it to the Sack, and sweeten
it to your taste with fine Sugar, and let it stand over a Skillet of
seething water for a while.


169. _To preserve Pippins in thin slices in Jelly._

Take of the fairest Pippins, pare them, and slice them into cold water,
to every pound of Pippins take a pound of Sugar, and a Pint of Water,
boil it and scum it, then shake your Pippins clean from the water, and
put them into the Syrup, boil them very clear and apace, then put in
some thin Chips, or Orange or Citron preserved, and to one Pound of
Pippin, put the Juice of two Oranges and one Limon, then boil them a
little longer till you see they will jelly, and then put them into
Glasses, but take heed you lay them in carefully, and lay the Chips here
and there between, and warm the Jelly and put softly over them.


170. _To preserve Currans in Jelly._

Take the fairest and pick them from the Stalks, and stone them, and take
their weight in sugar, wet it with water, boil it and scum it, then put
in your Currans, and boil them up quick, shake them often and scum them,
and when they will jelly, they are enough; then put them into Glasses;
thus you may do white and red both, and they will be in a stiff Jelly,
and cut very well, do not cover them before they be cold.


171. _To preserve ripe Apricocks._

Take them and stone them, and weigh them, and to every Pound of
Apricocks take a Pound of fine Sugar beaten small, then pare your
Fruit, and as you pare them, cast some Sugar over them, and so do till
all be done, then set them on the fire, and let the Sugar melt but
gently, then boil them a little in the Syrup, and set them by till the
next day, then boil them quick, and till they be very clear, then put
them in Pots, and boil the Syrup a little more, and put it to them, if
you would have them in Jelly, you must put some of the Infusion of
Goosberries, or of Pippins into your Syrup, and add more Sugar to it.


172. _To preserve Cornelions._

Take the fairest and weigh them, then take their weight in Sugar, and
lay a Lay of Sugar into the Pan, and then lay a Lay of Cornelions till
all be in, and let your last Lay be Sugar, then put a little water into
the midst of the Pan, and set it on the fire, and when the Sugar is
melted boil them up quick, and take them often and shake them, and scum
them, when you do perceive them to be very clear, they are enough.


173. _To make Marmalade of Cornelions._

Take them and stone them, and weigh them, and to every pound of Fruit
take a pound of Sugar, wet it with water, and boil it to a Candy height,
then put in your Fruit and boil it very clear and quick, and shake it
often, and scum it clean; when you see it very clear and very thick, it
is enough; you must keep it in a Stove or some warm place.


174. _To preserve Damsons._

Take the fairest, not too ripe, and take their weight in Sugar, wet your
Sugar with a little water, boil it and scum it, then put in your Damsons
and boil them a little, then set them by till the next day, then boil
them till they be very clear, and take them from the fire sometimes, and
let them stand a while to keep them from breaking, when they are clear,
take them out, and put them into Glasses, and boil the Syrup to a Jelly
and pour on them; be very careful how you take them to put them into
your Pots or Glasses for fear of breaking them.


175. _To make Orange Marmalade._

Take half a Pound of Orange Chips tenderly boiled in several waters, and
beaten fine in a Mortar, then take a Pound of fine sugar, wet it with
water, boil it and scum it, then put in your Orange, and half a Pound of
Pippin also beaten fine, and let them boil together till they are very
clear; then put in the Juice of one Orange and one Limon, and stir it
well, and let it boil a while longer, and then take it off and put it
into Glasses.


176. _To make Jelly of Pippins._

Take Pippins, pare them thin into a long Gallipot, and set that into
boiling water close covered, and so let it stand three or four hours,
they must be sliced thin as well as pared; when you think they are
infused enough, pour the Liquor from them, and to every Pint, take a
pound of Sugar double refined and put it into your Liquor, boil them
together till you find it will Jelly, then put little small pieces of
Orange Pill into it finely shred, the Juice of one Orange and one Limon,
and let it boil a little longer, and so put it into Glasses, and set
them into a Stove, with the Pulp that is left you may make Paste if you
please.


177. _To candy Angelica._

Take the tender green stalks and boil them in water till they be tender,
then peel them, and put them into another warm water, and cover them
till they are very green over a slow fire, then lay them on a clean
Cloth to dry, then take their weight in fine Sugar, and boil it to a
Candy height with some Rosewater, then put in your stalks, and boil them
up quick, and shake them often and when you judge they be enough, lay
them on a Pie-plate, and open them with a little stick, and so they will
be hollow, and some of them you may braid, and twist some of them, so
keep them dry.


178. _To make Seed-stuff of Rasberries._

Take Rasberries and bruise them, and take their weight in fine Sugar,
and boil it to a Candy height with a little water, then put in your
bruised Rasberries, and boil them till you see they will jelly very
well.


179. _To make Syrup of Gilly-flowers._

Take Clove-gilly-flowers, and cut them from the Whites, then take their
weight in Sugar beaten fine, then put a little sugar into your
Gally-pot, and then a Lay of Flowers, and then sugar again, till all be
spent, and let sugar be the last, then put in a Clove or two, according
to your quantity, and a little Malago Sack; and so tie your Pot up
close, and set it into a Pot or Kettle of boiling water, and let them
stand till they are infused; then poure out the Liquor and strain the
rest, but not too hard, then take this liquor and vapour it away over
seething water till it be of a good thickness, then take your strained
Gilliflowers and put them into a Pot with some White-wine Vinegar, and
cover them over with fine Sugar, and so keep them; they are a better
Sallad than those you pickle up alone; as you make this, you may make
syrup of any Herbs or Flowers.


180. _To make most excellent Cake._

Take a strik'd Peck of Flower, six pounds of Currans, half an Ounce of
Mace, half an Ounce of Cinamon, a quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, as much
of Nutmeg, half a pound of fine Sugar, and as much Rosewater as you
please; beat your Spice, and put that and your Fruits with a little Salt
into your Flower, then take Cream or new Milk as much as you think fit,
dissolve thereinto two pounds of fresh Butter, then put it in a Basin
with the sugar and a Pint of Sack, knead it with a Wine-Pint of
Ale-Yest, knead it till it rise under your hand, let all things be ready
and your Oven hot before you go to knead the Cake.


181. _To make Pomatum the best way._

Take the Caul of a Lamb new killed, pick it clean from the Skin, and lay
it in Spring-water nine days, shifting it every day twice, then melt it,
then take yellow Snails, stamp them, and put them into a Glass with
Rosewater four days, stop the Glass and shake it three or four times a
day, then take white Lilly roots, stamp them, and strain them, put the
Juice of them into the Glass with the Snails, then set a Skillet on the
fire with fair water, and let it boil, then put your dried Lambs Caul
into an earthen basin, and let it melt, then take your Glass with Snails
and roots, and drain it through a thick cloth, then put it into that
tried stuff, then take half an Ounce of white Sugar-Candy unbeaten put
it in, and stir it over the fire, till that be dissolved, then take it
from the fire, and put in three Ounces of sweet Almonds, keep it boiling
and stirring a little longer, then take it off, and let it stand till it
be reasonably cool, then beat it with a wooden Slice till it be very
white, then put in a little Rosewater, and beat it a little longer, and
then keep it in Gallipots; you must put in a crust of bread when you
melt it in the Skillet, and when the Sugar-Candy goes in, take it out.


182. _To make the Bean Bread._

Take a pound of the best Jordan Almonds; blanch them in cold water, and
slice them very thin the long way of the Almond with a wet Knife, then
take a pound of double refined Sugar well beaten, and mix with your
Almonds, then take the White of one Egg beaten with two spoonfuls of
Rosewater, and as the Froth ariseth, cast it all over your Almonds with
a Spoon, then mix them well together, and lay them upon Wafer sheets,
upon flowered Plates, and shape them as you please with your knife and
your fingers; then strew Caraway Comfits, and Orange and Citron Pill cut
thin, or some Coriander Comfits, so set them into an Oven not too hot,
and when they have stood about half an hour, raise them from their
Plates, and mend what you find amiss before they be too dry, then set
them into the Oven again, and when they are quite dry, break away the
Wafers with your fingers, and then clip them neatly with a pair of
Scizzers, and lay on some Leaf-Gold if you please.


183. _To make an excellent Cake with Caraway Comfits._

Take five Pounds of Manchet Paste mingled very stiff and light without
Salt, cover it, and let it be rising half an hour, when your Oven is
almost hot, take two pounds and half of Butter, very good, and melt it,
and take five Eggs, Yolks and Whites beaten, and half a pound of Sugar,
mingle them all together with your Paste, and let it be as lithe as
possible you can work it, and when your Oven is hot and swept, strew
into your Cake one Pound of Caraway Comfits, then butter a baking-Pan,
and bake it in that, let it stand one hour and quarter; when you draw
it, lay a course Linnen Cloth and a Woollen one over it, so let it lie
till it be cold, then put it into an Oven the next day, for a little
time, and it will eat as though it were made of Almonds, you must put in
your Sugar after your Butter.


184. _To make Diet Bread or Jumbolds._

Take a Quart of fine Flower, half a Pound of fine Sugar, Caraway seeds,
Coriander seeds and Aniseeds bruised, of each one Ounce, mingle all
these together, then take the Yolks of eight Eggs, and the Whites of
three, beat them well with four spoonfuls of Rosewater, and so knead
these all together and no other Liquor, when it is well wrought, lay it
for one hour in a linnen cloth before the Fire, then rowl it out thin,
tie them in Knots and prick them with a Needle, lay them upon Butter'd
Plates, and bake them in an Oven not too hot.


185. _To make Cider or Perry as clear as Rock water._

Take two Quarts of Cider, half a Pint of Milk, put them both in an
Hipocras bag, and when it runs clear, bottle it up, and when it is a
Month old, it will sparkle in the Glass as you drink it.


186. _To make Almond Bread._

Take a pound of Almonds blanched, and beaten with Rosewater, then take a
pound of Sugar beaten fine, and a little grated Bread finely searced,
put them into a Platter with your Almonds, and stir them well together,
set them over a Chafing dish of Coals, and boil them till they are as
stiff as Paste, stirring them continually, then mould them well and put
them in what shape you you please; print them, and set them into some
warm place to dry.


187. _To make good Almond Milk._

Take Jordan Almonds blanched and beaten with Rose water, then strain
them often with fair water, wherein hath been boiled Violet Leaves and
Sliced Dates; when your Almonds are strained, take the Dates and put to
it some Mace, Sugar, and a little Salt, warm it a little, and so drink
it.


188. _To make white Leach._

Take sweet Almonds blanched and beaten with Rosewater, then strained
with fair water, wherein hath been boiled Aniseeds and Ginger, put to it
as much cream, wherein pure Isinglass hath been boiled, as will make it
stiff, and as much Sugar as you please; let it be scalding hot, then run
it through a strainer, and when it is cold, slice it out, it is very
good for a weak body.


189. _To make Red Leach or Yellow._

Red by putting Tornsel into it, or Cochineal; Yellow by putting Saffron
in it.


190. _Cinamon or Ginger Leach._

Take your Spices beaten and searced, and mix them with your searced
Sugar, mould them up with Gum Arabick infused in Rosewater, and so print
them and dry them.


191. _To make Leach of Dates._

Take your Dates stoned and peeled very clean within, beat them fine with
Sugar, Ginger and Cinamon, and a little Rosewater till it will work like
Paste, then print them and keep them dry.


192. _To make fine Cakes._

Take a Quart of Flower, a Pound of sugar, a Pound of Butter, with three
or four Yolks of Eggs, a little Rosewater, and a spoonful of Yest, then
roul them out thin, while the Paste is hot, prick them, and set them
into the Oven not too hot.



193. _To make Cornish Cakes._

Take Claret Wine, the Yolks of Eggs, and Mace beaten fine, and some
Sugar and Salt, mingle all these with Flower and a little Yeast, knead
it as stiff as you can, then put in Butter, and knead it stiff again,
and then shape them and bake them.


194. _A Cordial Syrup._

Take one Pound of Juice of Burrage, and half so much of the Juice of
Balm, boil them together, and when the grossness of the Juice ariseth,
then put in the Whites of two Eggs beaten with Rosewater, and when you
see them begin to grow hard, put in a little Vinegar, let them boil
together, and scum it clean, and run it through a Jelly-Bag, then set it
over the fire again, and add to it one Pound of fine Sugar, and a little
Saffron, and so boil it till you think it be enough.


195. _For a Consumption._

Take of Harts-tongue and Maidenhair, of each one handful, Hysop and
Balm, of each half a handful, Licoras sliced, one Ounce, Piony Root one
Ounce, boil these together in two Pints and half of Spring water until
it be half consumed, then strain the Liquor from the Herbs, then take
four Ounces of Currans washed clean, dried and beaten in a Mortar, boil
them in the Liquor a little while, then strain it, and put to the Liquor
half a Pound of Sugar, and so boil it to a Syrup, and take often of it.


196. _For a Consumption._

Take a Pint of good Wine-Vinegar, and half a Pint of Colts-foot-water,
half a Pound of Figs well bruised, then strain it, and boil it with a
Pound of Sugar to a thick Syrup.


197. _A very good Perfume._

Six Spoonfuls of Rosewater, Musk, Ambergreece and Civet, of each two
Grains, a little Sugar beaten fine, mould them up together with
Gum-Dragon steeped in Rosewater, make them in little Cakes and dry them.


198. _A Cordial to cause sleep._

Two spoonfuls of Poppy water, two spoonfuls of Red Rosewater, one
spoonful of Clove-Gillyflower Syrup, and a little Diascordium, mingle
them together, and take them at the time of rest.


199. _To perfume Gloves._

Take four Grains of Musk and grind it with Rosewater, and also eight
Grains of Civet, then take two spoonfuls of Gum dragon steeped all night
in Rosewater, beat these to a thin Jelly, putting in half a spoonful of
Oil of Cloves, Cinamon and Jessamine mixed together, then take a Spunge
and dip it therin, and rub the Gloves all over thin, lay them in a dry
clean place eight and forty hours; then rub them with your hands till
they become limber.


200. _A very good Perfume to burn._

Take 2 ounces of the Powder of Juniper Wood, 1 Ounce of Benjamin, one
Ounce of Storax, 6 drops of oil of Limons, as much oil of Cloves, 10
grains of Musk, 6 of Civet, mold them up with a little Gum dragon
steeped in Rosewater, make them in little Cakes, and dry them between
Rose Leaves, your Juniper wood must be well dried, beaten and searced.


201. _To preserve Cherries in Jelly._

Take fair ripe Cherries, and stone them, then take a little more than
their weight in fine Sugar, then take the juyce of some other Cherries,
and put a spoonful of it in the bottom of the Posnet, then put some of
your Sugar beaten fine into the Posnet with it, and then a little more
juyce, then put in your Cherries, then put in Sugar, and then juyce, and
then Cherries again, thus do till you have put in all, then let them
boil apace till the Sugar be melted, shaking them sometimes, then take
them from the fire, and let them stand close covered one hour, then boil
them up quick till the Syrup will jelly.


202. _To dry Apricocks or Pippins to look as clear as Amber._

Take Apricocks and take out the Stones, and take Pippins and cut them in
halves and core them, let your Apricocks be pared also; lay these Fruits
in an earthen dish, and strew them over with fine Sugar, set them into a
warm Oven, and as the Liquor comes from them put it away, when all the
Liquor is come away turn them and strew them thick with Sugar on every
side, set them into the Oven again, and when the Sugar is melted lay
them on a dry dish, and set them in again, and every day, turn them till
they be quite dry, Thus you may dry any sort of Plumbs or Pears as well
as the other, and they will look very clear.


203. _To dry Pears or Pippins without Sugar._

Take of the fairest and lay them in sweetwort two or three days, then
lay them in a broad preserving Pan of earth, and bake them, but let the
Oven be but gently hot, then lay them upon lattice Sieves and set them
into a warm Oven, and turn them twice a day till they are dry.


204. _The Spanish Candy._

Take any sort of Flowers well picked and beaten in a Mortar, and put
them into a Syrup, so much as the Flowers will stain, boil them, and
stir them till you see it will turn Sugar again, then pour it upon a wet
trencher, and when it is cold cut it into Lozenges, and that which
remaineth in the bottom of the Posnet scrape it clean out, and beat it
and searce it, then work it with some Gum Dragon steeped in Rosewater
and a little Ambergreece, so make it into what shape you please, and dry
it.



205. _To make Naples Bisket._

Take four Ounces of Pine Apple seeds, two Ounces of sweet Almonds
blanched, the Whites of two Eggs, one spoonful of Ale-Yeast, one
spoonful of Rice Flower, one spoonful of sweet Cream, beat all these
together in a Mortar, then add to it Musk or Ambergreece, drop it upon a
Pie-plate, and make it in what shape you please, and so bake it.


206. _To make Italian Bisket._

Take Sugar searced fine, and beat in a Mortar with Gum Dragon steeped in
Rosewater, and also the White of an Egg, till it come to a perfect
Paste, then mould it up with searced Sugar, powder of Aniseeds, and a
little Musk, and make them in what shape you please, and bake them on
Pie-Plates, but not too much.


207. _To make Hippocras._

Take to every Gallon of Sack or White Wine, one Pound of Sugar, one
Ounce of Cinamon, one Ounce of Ginger, one quarter of an Ounce of
Nutmegs, a quarter of an Ounce of Coriander seed, with a few Cloves,
and a little Long Pepper or a few Grains, let all these steep together
four and twenty hours, stir it twice or thrice in that time; then put to
every Gallon one Pint of Milk, and run it through a Jelly-Bag, and then
bottle it, and let them be stopped very close, set them in a cool place,
it will keep a Month.


208. _To make Tuff-Taffity Cream._

Take a quart of thick Cream, the whites of eight Eggs beaten to a Froth
with Rosewater, then take off the Froth and put in into the Cream, and
boil it, and always stir it, then put in the Yolks of eight Eggs well
beaten, and stir them in off the Fire, and then on the fire a little
while, then season it with Sugar, and pour it out, and when it is cold,
lay on it Jelly of Currans or Rasberries, or what you please.


209. _Caraway Cake._

Take one Quart of Flower, and one pound of Butter, rub your Butter into
your Flower very well, then take two Yolks of Eggs and one White, two
spoonfuls of Cream, half a Pint of Ale-Yest, mix them all together, do
not knead it, but pull it in pieces, then set it to the fire to rise,
and so let it lie almost one hour, turning it often, then pull it in
pieces again, and strew in half a pound of Caraway Comfits, mingle them
with the Paste, then take it lightly with your hand, fashion it like an
Oval, and make it higher in the middle than the sides, let your Oven be
as hot as for a Tart, be sure your Oven or Cake be ready both at once,
put it upon a double paper buttered, and let it stand almost an hour,
when it goes into the Oven, strew it thick with Caraway-Comfits, and lay
a paper over least it scorch.


210. _To Candy Barberries._

Stone the fairest Bunches you can get, and as you stone them strew in a
little Sugar, then take so much water as you think will cover them, and
let them boil in it with a little Sugar a little while, then put them
into a deep thing that the Syrup may cover them, then boil a little
water and sugar to a Candy height, then having your Barberries drained
well from the Syrup put them into the hot Candy, stir them gently til
the Sugar be dissolved, but do not let them boil in it, then open every
branch and lay them upon the brims of dishes, shift them often on clean
dishes and open them every time, then set them into an Oven or Stove to
dry.


211. _To make a very fine Sillibub._

Take one Quart of Cream, one Pint and an half of Wine or Sack, the Juice
of two Limons with some of the Pill, and a Branch of Rosemary, sweeten
it very well, then put a little of this Liquor, and a little of the
Cream into a Basin, beat them till it froth, put that Froth into the
Sillibub pot, and so do till the Cream and Wine be done, then cover it
close, and set it in a cool Cellar for twelve hours, then eat it.


212. _Fine sweet Powder for the hair._

Take one pound of the best starch you can get, put it into a Basin with
half a Pint of Rosemary water, as much Rosewater, stir them well
together with a Spoon, then dry them well in the Sun, then take the
searced Powder of Damask Roses, and four grains of Ambergreece, mix it
well with your Starch, and sift it fine.


213. _To make Cakes of Pistachoes._

Take half a pound of Almonds Blanched, half a pound of Pistachoes
blanched, four Ounces of Pine-Apple seeds, beat these together in a
Mortar with a little Rosewater till it come to perfect Paste, then put
in the weight of it in Sugar, and beat it again, then mould it with
searced Sugar, and lay it upon Wafer sheets, and fashion them as you
please; then stick them with quartered Pistachoes; that they may make it
look like a Hedghog, then with a Feather Ice them over with the White of
an Egg, Rosewater and Sugar, then bake them carefully.


214. _To make Cakes of Apricocks in Lumps._

Take Apricocks, and pare them and cut them in halves, then take their
weight in Sugar, put half this Sugar and the Apricocks into a Posnet,
let them boil apace till they look clear, then boil the other part of
the Sugar to a Candy height, then put them together, and stir them a
while, then put them into Glasses and set them into a Stove, and when
the one side is dry, turn the other.



215. _To make Rasberry Sugar._

Take the Juice of Rasberries and wet your Sugar with it, and dry it in a
Stove in little Cakes; this will keep all the year, a little of it being
put into a Glass of Wine, will give it as good a taste, as you can
desire, and as good a colour; in this manner you may make Sugar of any
Fruit, Flower, or Herb.


216. _To dry Apricocks._

Take your fairest Apricocks and stone them, then weigh them, and as you
pare them, throw them into cold water, have in readiness their weight in
fine sugar, wet it with some of the water they lie in, and boil it to a
Candy height, then put in your Apricocks, and boil them till they are
clear, when they have lain three or four days in the Syrup, lay them out
upon Glasses to dry in a stove, and turn them twice a day.


217. _To make rough Marmalade of Cherries._

Stone your Cherries, and infuse them in a long Gallipot in a Kettle of
boiling water, when they are all to pieces, then take their weight in
fine Sugar boiled to a Candy height with a little water, then put in
your Apricocks and stir them over a slow fire, but do not let it boil,
when it will jelly, put it into Glasses.


218. _To make smooth Marmalade of Cherries._

Infuse them as you do the other, then strain them hard, and boil the
Juice with a Candy as you do the other.


219. _To make white Trencher-Plates which may be eaten._

Take two Eggs beaten very well, Yolks and Whites, two spoonfuls of Sack,
one spoonful of Rosewater, and so much flower as will make it into a
stiff Paste, then roule it thin, and then lay it upon the outsides of
Plates well-buttered, cut them fit to the Plates, and bake them upon
them, then take them forth, and when they are cold, take a pound of
double refin'd Sugar beaten and searced, with a little Ambergreece, the
White of an Egg and Rosewater, beat these well together, and Ice your
Plates all over with it, and set them into the Oven again till they be
dry.


220. _To make the Froth Posset._

Take three Pints of Cream or new Milk, set it on the fire, then take
sixteen Eggs and put the Whites into a Basin very deep, and beat the
Yolks by themselves, make a Custard with them, and the Cream which is on
the fire, then beat the Yolks to a Froth with a little Sack, and a
little Sugar, when it is a thick Froth, cast it into another Dish with a
Spoon, then take half a Pint of Sack, and sweeten it with Sugar, set it
on a Chafing-dish of Coals in a large Basin, when it is hot, put in as
much Froth as the Sack will receive, stir it in very well, then take
your Custard and pour upon it, stir it all one way when you put it in,
then if the Froth do not cover the top of the Posset, put in more, and
stir it very well, and cover it close with a warm Dish, let it stand a
while upon Coals, but not too hot; you may know when it is enough by
putting your Spoon into the Basin, for then it will be clear in the
bottom, Curd in the middle, and Froth on the top.


221. _To make_ Banbury _Cakes._

Make a Posset of Sack and Cream, then take a Peck of fine Flower, half
an Ounce of Mace, as much of Nutmeg, as much of Cinamon, beat them and
searce them, two pounds of Butter, ten Eggs, leaving out half their
Whites, one Pint and half of Ale-Yest, beat your Eggs very well, and
strain them, then put your Yest, and some of the Posset to the Flower,
stir them together, and put in your Butter cold in little pieces, but
your Posset must be scalding hot; make it into a Paste, and let it lie
one hour in a warm Cloth to rise, then put in ten pounds of Currans
washed and dried very well, a little Musk and Ambergreece dissolved in
Rosewater, put in a little Sugar among your Currans break your Paste
into little pieces, when you go to put in your Currans, then lay a Lay
of broken Paste, and then a Lay of Currans till all be in, then mingle
your Paste and Currans well together, and keep out a little of your
Paste in a warm Cloth to cover the top and bottom of your Cake, you must
rowl the Cover very thin, and also the Bottom, and close them together
over the Cake with a little Rosewater; prick the top and bottom with a
small Pin or Needle, and when it is ready to go into the Oven, cut in
the sides round about, let it stand two hours, then Ice it over with
Rosewater or Orange Flower and Sugar, and the White of an Egg, and
harden it in the Oven.


222. _To make_ Cambridge _Almond Butter._

Take a Quart of Cream and sixteen Eggs well beaten, mix them together
and strain them into a Posnet, set them on a soft fire, and stir them
continually; when it is ready to boil, put in half a quarter of a Pint
of Sack, and stir it till it run to a Curd, then strain the Whey from it
as much as may be, then beat four Ounces of blanched Almonds with
Rosewater, then put the Curd and beaten Almonds and half a pound of fine
Sugar into a Mortar, and beat them well together, then put it into
Glasses and eat it with bread, it will keep a Fortnight.


223. _To make a Sack Posset without Milk or Bread._

Take a Quart of Ale and half a Pint of Sack, boil them with what spice
you please, then take three quarters of a pound of sugar, and twenty
Eggs, Yolks and Whites well beaten and strained, then take four Ounces
of Almonds blanched and beaten with Rosewater, put them to the Eggs, and
put them to the other things in the Posnet upon the fire, and keep them
stirring, and when it boileth up, put it into a Bason, and strew on
beaten spice and sugar, you must also sweeten it when the Eggs go in.


224. _To preserve Figs and dry them._

To every pound of your large ripe English Figs, take a pound of Sugar,
and one Pint of Water boil your Sugar and Water, and scum it, then put
in your Figs, and boil them very well till they are tender & clear; boil
them very fast, when they have been in the Syrup a week, boil some sugar
to a Candy height, and put in the Figs, and when you perceive they are
enough, lay them out to dry.


225. _To pickle Mushromes._

Take them of one nights growth, and peel them inside and outside, boil
them in Water and Salt one hour, then lay them out to cool, then make a
pickle of White Wine and White Wine Vinegar, and boil in it whole
Cloves, Nutmegs, Mace, and Ginger sliced, and some whole Pepper, when
it is cold, put them into it, and keep them for Sauces of several Meats;
and if you would dress them to eat presently, put them in a Dish over a
Chafingdish of Coals without any Liquor, and the fire will draw out
their natural Liquor, which you must pour away, then put in whole Spice,
Onions and Butter, with a little Wine, and so let them stew a while,
then serve it in.


226. _To preserve whole Quinces to look red._

When they are pared and cored, put them into cold water, and for every
Pound of Quince take one Pound of Sugar, and a Pint of Water, make a
Syrup thereof, then put in your Quinces, and set them on a slow fire,
close covered, till you see they are of a good Colour and very tender,
then take them out, and boil your Syrup till it will Jelly.


227. _To make very good Marmalade of Quinces to look red._

Weigh your Quinces and pare them, cut them in quarters and core them,
and keep them in cold water, then take their weight in sugar, and a
little water, and boil it, and scum it, then put in your Quinces, and
set them on a slow fire, close covered, till you see it of a good
colour, then uncover it, and boil it up very quick till you find that it
will jelly very well.


228. _To make Musk Sugar._

Bruise six grains of Musk and tie them in a piece of Tiffany, lay it in
the bottom of a Gallipot, and then fill it with sugar, and tie it up
close, when you have spent that sugar, put in some more, it will be well
perfumed.


229. _An excellent way to make Syrup of Roses, or of any other Flower._

Fill a Silver Bason three quarters full of Spring water, then fill it up
with Rose-Leaves or any other, and cover it, and set it upon a pot of
seething water one hour, then strain it, and put in more; and do in like
manner, and so do seven times, then take to every Pint one Pound of
Sugar, and make a Syrup therewith.


230. _To dry Rose Leaves._

Pick your Roses, and dry them upon the Leads of a house in a Sun-shine
day, and turn them as you do Hay, and when they are through dry, keep
them in broadmouth'd Glasses close stopped.


231. _To Candy Flowers._

Boil some Rosewater and Sugar together, then put in your Flowers being
very dry and boil them a little, then strew in some fine Sugar over
them, and turn them, and boil them a little more, then take them from
the fire, and strew some more Sugar over them, then take them out and
lay them to dry, and open them, and strew Sugar over them; they will dry
in a few hours in a hot day.


232. _The making of Sugar-Plate and casting of it into Moulds._

Take one Pound of double refin'd Sugar beaten and searced, and three
Ounces of pure white Starch beaten and searced, then have some
Gum-Dragon steeped in Rosewater, and put some of it with the Sugar and
Starch and a little of Ambergreece into a Mortar, and beat them till
they come to a perfect Paste, you must also put in a little White of an
Egg with the Gum, then mould it with searced Sugar, then dust your
Moulds with Sugar, then roul out your Paste and lay it into the Mould,
pressing it down into every hollow part with your fingers, and when it
hath taken impression, knock the Mould on the edge against a Table and
it will come out, or you may help it with the point of your knife; if
you find you have put in too much Gum, then add more Sugar, if too much
Sugar, then more Gum, work it up as fast as you can, when they come out
of the Moulds trim them handsomely; if you would make saucers, dishes,
or bowls, you must rowl it out thin and put your Paste into a saucer,
dish, or bowl for a Mould, and let them stand therein till they be very
dry, then gild them on the edges with the white of and Egg laid round
about the edge with a pencil, and press the Gold down with some Cotton,
and when it is dry brush off the superfluous loose Gold with the foot of
an Hare, and if you would have your Paste exceeding smooth, as for Cards
or the like, then roul your Paste upon a slicked paper with a very
smooth Rouling-pin; if you would colour any of it, you must take the
searced powder of any Herbs or Flowers, first dryed, and put to it when
you beat it in a Mortar with the Gum.


233. _To make Paste of Almonds._

Take four Ounces of _Valentia_ Almonds, blanched and beaten with
Rosewater till it come to perfect Paste, then take stale white bread,
grate it and sift it, and dry it by the fire, then put that to your
Almonds with the weight of all in fine Sugar, beat them very well, and
put in some Spice beaten and searced, then when it is a little cool,
roul it out, dust your Moulds and print it, and dry it in an Oven, you
may if you please put the juice of a Limon into it when it is beating,
you may make some of it into Jumbolds, and tie them in knots and bake
them upon Buttered Plates, and when they are baked, ice them over with
Rosewater, Sugar, and the White of an Egg, and set them into the Oven
again for a while.


234. _To make French Bisket._

Take half a Peck of fine Flower, two Ounces of Coriander seeds, the
Whites of four Eggs, half a Pint of Ale Yest, and as much water as will
make it up into a stiff Paste, let your water be blood warm, then bake
it in a long Roll as big as your Thigh, let it be in the Oven but one
hour, when it is two days old, pare it and slice it thin over-thwart,
then ice it over thin, and set it into the Oven to dry.


235. _To make Ginger-bread._

Take three stale Manchets grated and sifted, then put to them half an
Ounce of Cinamon, as much Ginger, half an Ounce of Licoras and Aniseeds
together, beat all these and searce them, and put them in with half a
Pound of fine Sugar, boil all these together with a quart of Claret,
stirring them continually till it come to a stiff Paste, then when it is
almost cold, mould it on a Table with some searced Spice and Sugar, then
bake it in what shape you please.


236. _Another sort of Ginger-bread._

Take half a pound of sweet Almonds blanched and beaten, half a pound of
fine Flower first dried in an Oven, one Pound of fine Sugar, what sorts
of Spices you please, beaten and searced, and also Seeds, beat all
these together with two Eggs, both Yolks and Whites, then mould it with
flower and Sugar together, and so bake it in what shape you please.


237. _To make Puff-Paste._

Take a quart of the finest Flower, the Whites of three Eggs, and the
Yolks of two, and a little cold water, make it into a perfect Paste,
then roul it abroad thin, then lay on little bits of Butter, and fold it
over again, then drive it abroad again, and lay on more Butter, and then
fold it over, and so do ten times, make it up for your use, and put your
Fruit or Meat therein and bake it.


238. _Another way for Puff-Paste._

Take fine Flower half a Peck, the Yolks of five Eggs and one White, one
Pound of Butter, half a pint of Cream, and a little fair water, break
your Butter in little Bits and do not mould it too much, but roul it
abroad so soon as you can, and let the Butter be seen in spots, for that
will make it hollow when it comes into the Oven, then put in your Meat
or Fruit, and close it over, and wash it over with the Yolk of an Egg
and Cream beaten together, just when you set it into the Oven; let your
Oven be quick, but do not let it stand too long, for that will spoil it.


239. _To make short Paste without Butter._

Bake your Flower first, then take a quart of it, and the Yolks of three
Eggs and a Pint of Cream, two Ounces of fine Sugar, and a little Salt,
and so make it into Paste.


240. _To Candy whole Spices with a hard Rock-Candy._

Take one Pound of fine Sugar, and eight spoonfuls of Rosewater, and the
weight of six pence of Gum Arabick that is clear, boil them together
till a drop will run as small as a hair; then put it into an earthen
Pipkin, and having before steeped your spices one night or two in
Rosewater, put your spices into the Pipkin, and stop it up close that no
Air get in, keep it in a hot place three weeks, then break your Pot with
a Hammer.

Thus you may do with preserved Oranges and Limons, any kinds of Fruits
and flowers, or Herbs if you please.


241. _To make very fine Bisket._

Take half a Pound of searced Sugar, the Yolks of six Eggs, a little
searced spice and Seeds, and a little Ambergreece or Musk, your Eggs
must be very hard, then put all these into a Mortar and beat them to a
Paste with a little Gum Dragon steeped in Rosewater all night, then
mould it up with fine Sugar; and make it into pretty Fancies, and dry
them in a warm Oven.


242. _To make Orange, or Limon or Citron Bisket._

Take either of these preserved and washed from their Syrup, beat them
well in a Mortar, and then put in a little Gum Dragon as before, beat
them again together till it be a perfect Paste, then mould it up with
Sugar searced, and make them up in what shape you please and dry it.


243. _To make Bisket of Potato-Roots or Parsneps._

Take their Roots boil'd very tender, and beat them in a Mortar with
their weight of searced Sugar, then put in a little Gum dragon as
before, beat them to a Paste, and mould them up with Sugar searced, and
make them up in what shape you please, and dry them.


244. _To pickle Oranges or Limons, taught me by a Seaman._

Take those which are free from any spots, and lay them gently in a
Barrel, then fill up the Barrel with Sea-water, and so cover your Vessel
close, for want of Sea-water, you may take fair water, and make it so
strong with Bay Salt, that it will bear an Egg, and put to them in like
manner.


245. _To keep Grapes fresh and green, taught me by a Sea-Captain._

Take your fairest Grapes without any blemish, then lay some Oats in a
Box; and then a Lay of Grapes, and then more Oats, and so do till you
have laid all in, then cover the Grapes well with Oats, and close your
box fast that no Air get in.


246. _To dry Grapes to keep longer._

Take your best Clusters and hang them up in a Room upon Lines, and be
sure you do not let them touch one another, they will keep four months.


247. _To make Marmalade of Oranges or Limons._

Boil the Rinds of them in several Waters till they be very tender, beat
them small with their weight of Pippins, then take the weight of all in
fine Sugar, and to every Pound of Sugar, a Pint of Water, boil your
Water and Sugar together, and make a Syrup, then put in your Pulp, and
boil it a good while till it be clear, then put in the Juice of some
Orange and Limon, so much as will give it a fine taste, then boil it a
little longer till you see it will jelly very well, then put it into
Glasses, and keep it in a reasonable warm place; this is very Cordial,
and stoppeth Rheum.



248. _To make green Ginger wet._

Take one pound of Ginger, and steep it in Red-Wine and Vinegar equally
mixed, let it stand so close covered twelve days, and twice every day
stir it up and down, then take two quarts of Red-Wine and as much
Vinegar, and boil them together a little while, then put in three pounds
of Sugar and make a Syrup therewith, then put in your Ginger and boil it
a while, then set it by till the next day, so boil it every day a
little, till it be very clear, and so keep it in the Syrup.


249. _To make a Sallad of Limons._

Take the rinds of Limons cut in halves, and boil them in several waters
till they are very tender, then take Vinegar, Water and Sugar, and make
a Syrup, then put in your Limons, first cut as you would an
Apple-paring, round and round till you come at the top, boil them a
while in the Syrup, then set them by till the next day, then boil them
again a little, and so do till you see they be clear, and the Syrup
thick; when you serve them to the Table, wash them in Vinegar.


250. _To stew Prunes without fire._

Take your largest Prunes well washed, and put them into a broad mouthed
Glass, then put to them some Claret Wine, and whole Spice, and cover
your Glass very well, and set it in the Sun ten days or more, and they
will eat very finely; you must also put a little Sugar into the Glass
with them.


251. _To make Syrup of the Juice of Citrons or Limons._

Take the Juyce of either of them, and put twice the weight of fine Sugar
therein, put it into a long Gallipot, and set that pot into a Kettle of
boiling water, till you see they be well incorporated, then take it out,
and when it is cold put it up.


252. _To make Punch._

Take one Quart of Claret wine, half a Pint of Brandy, and a little
Nutmeg grated, a little Sugar, and the Juice of a Limon, and so drink
it.


253. _To make Limonado._

Take one Quarrt of Sack, half a Pint of Brandy, half a Pint of fair
Water, the Juyce of two Limons, and some of the Pill, so brew them
together, with Sugar, and drink it.


254. _To make Paste of Pomewaters._

Take your Pomewater Apples, and put them in a long Gallipot, and set
that Pot in a Kettle of boiling water, till your Apples are tender, then
pare them, and cut them from the Core, and beat them in a Mortar very
well, then take their weight in fine Sugar, and boil it to a Candy
height with a little water, then put in your Apples, and boil them till
it will come from the bottom of the Posnet, when it is almost cold mould
it with searced Sugar, and make it in Cakes and dry them.


255. _To make Syrup of Rasberries, or of other Fruits, as Grapes or the
like._

Take the Juyce of your Fruits and the weight thereof in fine Sugar, mix
them together, and put them into a long Gally-pot, and set that pot
into a Kettle of seething water, and when you see it is enough let it
cool, and then put it up; after you have strained out your Juice, you
must let it stand to settle three or four days before you put the Sugar
into it, and then take only the clearest, this is exceeding good and
comfortable in all Feavers.


256. _To make a Caudle for a sick body both pleasant and comfortable._

Take a quart of white Wine, and boil it a while with a Blade of large
Mace, and a little whole Cinamon, then take four Ounces of sweet Almonds
blanched and beaten with a little Rosewater, then strain your Almonds
with the Wine, and set it over the fire again, and when it is scalding
hot, put in the Yolks of four Eggs, and as much Sugar as you think fit.



257. _How to cover all kinds of Seeds, or little pieces of Spices, or
Orange or Limon Pill, with Sugar for Comfits._

First of all you mast have a deep bottomed Basin of Brass or Latin, with
two ears of Iron to hang it with two Cords over some hot Coals.

You must also have a broad Pan to put Ashes in, and hot Coals upon them.

You must have a Brass Ladle to let run the Sugar upon the Seeds.

You must have a Slice of Brass to scrape away the Sugar from the sides
of the hanging Basin if need be.

Having all these things in readiness, do as followeth;

Take fine white Sugar beaten, and let your Seeds and Spice be dry, then
dry them again in your hanging Basin:

Take to every two pounds of Sugar one quarter of a pound of Spices or
Seeds, or such like.

If it be Aniseeds, two pounds of Sugar to half a pound of Aniseeds, will
be enough.

Melt your Sugar in this manner, put in three Pounds of Sugar into the
Basin, and one Pint of Water, stir it well till it be wet, then melt it
very well and boil it very softly until it will stream from the Ladle
like Turpentine, and not drop, then let it seeth no more, but keep it
upon warm Embers, that it may run from the Ladle upon the seeds.

Move the Seeds in the hanging Basin so fast as you can or may, and with
one hand, cast on half a Ladle full at a time of the hot Sugar, and rub
the Seeds with your other hand a pretty while, for that will make them
take the Sugar the better, and dry them well after every Coat.

Do thus at every Coat, not only in moving the Basin, but also with
stirring of the Comfits with the one hand, and drying the same: in every
hour you may make three pounds of Comfits; as the Comfits do increase in
bigness, so you may take more Sugar in your Ladle to cast on:

But for plain Comfits, let your Sugar be of a light decoction last, and
of a high decoction first, and not too hot.

For crisp and ragged Comfits make your decoction so high, as that it may
run from the Ladle, and let it fall a foot high or more from the Ladle,
and the hotter you cast on your sugar, the more ragged will your Comfits
be; also the Comfits will not take so much of the sugar, as upon a
light decoction, and they will keep their raggedness long; this high
decoction must serve for eight or ten Coats, and put on at every time
but one Ladle full.

A quarter of a pound of Coriander seeds, and three pounds of sugar, will
serve for very great Comfits.

See that you keep your Sugar in the Basin always in good temper, that it
burn not in Lumps, and if at any time it be too high boiled, put in a
spoonful or two of water, and keep it warily with your Ladle, and let
your fire be always very clear, when your Comfits be made, set them in
Dishes upon Paper in the Sun or before the Fire, or in the Oven after
Bread is drawn, for the space of one hour or two, and that will make
them look very white.


257. [Transcriber's note: so numbered in original] _To make a fine
Cullis or Jelly._

Take a red Cock, scald, wash, and dress him clean, seeth it in white
Wine or Rhenish Wine, and scum it clean, put in a Pint of thick cream to
it, then put in whole Spices, Sugar and Rosewater, and boil them
together.


258. _A white Jelly with Almonds._

Take Rosewater and Gum Dragon first steeped, or Isinglass dissolved, and
some Cinamon whole, seeth these together, then take one pound of Almond
blanched and beaten with Rosewater, then put them in and seeth them with
the rest, stir them always, and when it is enough, sweeten it to your
taste, and when it is cold eat it.


259. _To make sweet Cakes without Sugar._

Wash some Parsnep roots, scrape them and slice them very thin dry them
in a Dish in an Oven, and beat them to a Powder, mix them with an equal
quantity of fine Flower, mix them with Cream, beaten Spice and Salt, and
so make them and bake them.


260. _To keep Roses or Gilliflowers very long._

Take them when they are very fresh, and in the bud, and gathered very
dry, dip them in the whites of Eggs well beaten, and presently strew
thereon searced sugar, and put them up in luted Pots, and set them in a
cool place, in sand or gravel, and with a Filip of your finger at any
time you may strike off the coat, and you will have the Flower fresh and
fair.


261. _How to keep Walnuts long fresh and good._

Make a lay of the dry stampings of Crabs when the Verjuice is pressed
forth, then a Lay of Walnuts, and then Crabs again, till all be in, then
cover the Vessel very well, and when you eat them, they will be as
though they were new gathered.


262. _To pickle Quinces._

Put them into a Vessel, and fill up the Vessel with small Ale, or white
Wine Lees, which is better, and cover your Vessel well that no Air get
in.


263. _To keep Artichokes._

Take your Artichokes, and cut off the stalks within two inches of the
Apple, and of these stalks make a strong Decoction, slicing them into
thin and small pieces, and boil them with water and salt; when it is
cold, put in your Artichokes, and keep them from the Air.

When you spend them, lay them first in warm water, and then in cold, to
take away the bitterness.


264. _To make Clove or Cinamon Sugar._

Put Sugar in a Box, and lay Spices among it, and close up the Box fast,
and in short time it will smell and tast very well.


265. _To make Irish_ Aquavitæ.

Take to every Gallon of good _Aquavitæ_, two Ounces of Licoras bruised,
two ounces of Aniseeds bruised, let them stand six days in a Vessel of
Glass close stopped, then pour out as much of it as will run clear,
dissolve in that clear six great spoonfuls of the best Molasses, then
put it into another Glass, then add to it some Dates and Raisins of the
Sun stoned; this is very good for the Stomach.


266. _To distil Roses speedily._

Stamp your Roses in a Mortar with a little Rosewater, and then distill
them: This way will yield more water by much than the common way.


267. _To make Scotch Brewis._

Take a Manchet and pare off the crust then slice it thin and whole round
the Loaf, and lay these slices into a deep dish cross ways, one slice
lying upon the edge of the other a little, that they may lye quite cross
the dish, then fill it up with Cream and put whole Spice therein, so set
it over a Chafing-dish of Coals very hot, and always cast the Cream all
over the Bread with a spoon till all be spent, which will be above an
hour, then take some Sack and sweeten it with Sugar, and pour all over
it, and serve it to the Table.


268. _To make fine Black Puddings._

Take the Blood of a Hog, and strain it, and let it stand to settle,
putting in a little Salt while it is warm, then pour off the water on
the top of the Blood, and put so much Oatmeal as you think fit, let it
stand all night, then put in eight Eggs beaten very well, as much Cream
as you think fit, one Nutmeg or more grated, some Pennyroyal and other
Herbs shred small, good store of Beef Sewet shred very small, and a
little more Salt, mix these very well together, and then have your Guts
very well scoured, and scraped with the back of a Knife, fill them but
not too full, then when you have tyed them fast, wash them in fair
water, and let your water boil when they go in; then boil them half an
hour, then stir them with the handle of a Ladle and take them up and lay
them upon clean straw, and prick them with a Needle, and when they are a
little cool put them into the boiling water again, and boil them till
they are enough.


269. _To make the best Almond-Puddings._

Take a quart of thick Cream and boil it a while with whole Spice, then
put in half a pound of sweet Almonds blanched and beaten to a Paste with
Rosewater, boil these together till it will come from the bottom of the
Posnet, continually stirring it for fear it burn:

Then put it out, and when it is cool, put in twelve yolks of Eggs, and
six Whites, some Marrow in big Bits, or Beef Suet shred small, as much
Sugar as you think fit, then fill your Guts being clean scraped; you may
colour some of them if you please, and into some put plumped Currans,
and boil them just as you do the other.


270. _To make a Rice pudding to bake._

Take three Pints of Milk or more, and put therein a quarter of a Pound
of Rice, clean washed and picked, then set them over the fire, and let
them warm together, and often stir them with a wooden Spoon, because
that will not scrape too hard at the bottom, to make it burn, then let
it boil till it be very thick, then take it off and let it cool, then
put in a little Salt, some beaten Spice, some Raisins and Currans, and
some Marrow, or Beef Suet shred very small, then butter your Pan, and so
bake it, but not too much.


271. _To make a Pudding of wild Curds._

Take wild Curds and Cream with them, put thereto Eggs, both yolks and
whites, Rosewater, Sugar, and beaten Spice with some Raisins and
Currans, and some Marrow, and a little Salt, then butter a Pan, and bake
it.


272. _To make Pudding of Plum Cake._

Slice your Cake into some Cream or Milk, and boil it, and when it is
cold, put in Eggs, Sugar, a little Salt and some Marrow, so butter a Pan
and bake it, or fill guts with it.


273. _To make Bisket Pudding._

Take Naples Biskets and cut them into Milk, and boil it, then put in
Eggs, Spice Sugar, Marrow, and a little Salt, and so boil it and bake
it.


274. _To make a dry Oatmeal Pudding._

Take your Oatmeal well picked, and put into it a little Salt, some
Raisins and Currans, and some beaten spice, and good store of Beef Suet
finely shred, so tie it up hard in a Cloth, and let your water boil when
you put it in; and let it boil very well; if you would butter it, then
leave out the Suet; and if you would leave out the Fruit, then put in
sweet herbs good store.


275. _To make Almond puddings a different way from the other._

Take two Manchets and grate them, then scald them in some Cream, then
put in some Almonds Blanched and beaten as you do other, with Rosewater,
let there be about half a pound, then put in eight Eggs well beaten,
some Spice, Sugar, Salt and Marrow, and having your Guts well scowred
and scraped, fill them, but not too full, and boil them as you do the
other; or bake it if you please; Currans will do well in it.


276. _To make a Quaking Pudding._

Take Grated Bread, a little Flower, Sugar, Salt, beaten Spice, and store
of Eggs well beaten, mix these well, and beat them together, then dip a
clean Cloth in hot water, and flower it over, and let one hold it at
the four corners till you put it in, so tie it up hard, and let your
Water boil when you put it in, then boil it for one hour, and serve it
in with Sack, Sugar and Butter.


277. _To make good Dumplings._

Take some Flower and a little Salt, and a little Ale-Yest, and so much
water as will make it into a Paste, so let your water boil when you do
put them in; boil them but a little while, and then butter them.


278. _Another way to make Dumplings._

Take half a quarter of a Peck of Flower, and one Egg, yolk and white,
half a Pound of Butter broke in little Bits, mix them together with so
much cold Milk as will make it up, do not break your Butter too small,
for then they will not flake; make them up like Rouls of Butter, and
when your water boils, put them in, and do not boil them too much, then
butter them.


279. _Another way to make Dumplings._

Take Flower and temper it very light with Eggs, Milk, or rather Cream,
beaten Spice, Salt, and a little Sugar, then wet a Cloth in hot water,
and flower it, and so boil it for a Pudding, or else make it pretty
stiff with the Flower and a little grated Bread, and so boil them for
Dumplings, then butter them, and serve them in.


280. _To make a green Pudding to Butter._

Take a Quart of Cream and boil it, then put in twelve Eggs, yolks and
whites well beaten, and one Manchet grated small, a little salt, beaten
Spice and some Sugar:

Then colour it well with some Juice of Spinage, or if you will have it
yellow, colour it with Saffron, so boil it in a wet Cloth flowred as
before, and serve it in with Wine, Sugar and Butter, and stick it with
blanched Almonds split in halves, and pour the sauce over it, and it
will look like a Hedghog.

You may at some time stick it with Candied Orange Pill or Limon Pill, or
Eringo Roots Candied, you may sometimes strew on some Caraway Comfits,
and if you will bake it, then put in some Marrow, and some Dates cut
small: thus you have many Puddings taught in one.


281. _To make a Pudding of a Hogs Liver._

Take your liver and boil it in water and salt, but not too much;

Then beat it fine in a Mortar, and put to it one Quart of Cream, a
little Salt, Rosewater, Sugar, beaten Spice and Currans, with six Eggs
beaten very well: mix it well.

And if you bake it, put in Marrow, or if you boil it in Skins.

But if you boil it in a Cloth, then leave it out; and butter it when it
is boiled.


282. _To make a Rasberry Pudding._

Take a Quart of Cream and boil it with whole Spice a while, then put in
some grated Bread, and cover it off the Fire, that it may scald a
little; then put in eight Eggs well beaten, and sweeten it with Sugar;
then put in a Pint or more of whole Rasberries, and so boil it in a
Cloth, and take heed you do not boil it too much, then serve it in with
Wine, Butter and Sugar.

You may sometimes leave out the Rasberries, and put in Cowslip Flowers,
or Goosberries.


283. _To make a Calves foot Pudding._

Take those which are tenderly boiled and shred them small with
Beef-Suet, then put to four Feet one quart of Cream and eight Eggs well
beaten, a little Salt, some Rosewater and Sugar, some beaten Spice, and
one pound of Currans; mix all these well together, and boil it or bake
it; but if you would Butter it, then do not put in Suet.


284. _To make a Pudding to rost._

Take a Pint of Cream, scald a little grated Bread in it, then put in
three Eggs beaten, a little Flower, Currans, beaten Spice, Suet, Sugar
and Salt, with some Beef Suet finely shred, make it pretty stiff, and
wrap it in a Lambs Caul, and rost it on a Spit with a Loin of Lamb; if
you please, you may put in a little Rosewater.


285. _To make Cream of divers things._

Take a Quart of Cream and boil it a while, then put in eight yolks of
Eggs, and six Whites well beaten, put them in over the Fire, and stir
them lest they turn, then when it is almost enough, put in some Candied
Eringo Root, Orange or Limon Pill Candied, and cut thin, preserved
Plums, without the Stones, Quince, Pippin, Cherries, or the like; if you
do not like it so thick, put fewer Eggs into it.


286. _To make Cream of Artichoke Bottoms._

Take a Quart of Cream and boil it with a little whole Mace a while; then
have your Artichoke Bottoms boiled very tender, and bruise them well in
a Mortar, then put them into the Cream, and boil them a while, then put
in so many yolks of Eggs as you think fit, and sweeten it to your taste;
when you think it is enough, pour it out, and serve it in cold.


287. _To pickle Barberries._

Take your Barberries and pick out the fairest Bunches of them, then take
the Refuse, and with some Water and Salt, so strong as will bear an Egg,
boil them together for half an hour or more, then lay your fair Bunches
into a Pot, and when the Liquor is cold, pour it over them.


288. _To pickle French Beans._

Take them before they be too old, and boil them tender, then put them
into a pickle made with Vinegar and Salt, and so keep them; it is a very
good and pleasant Sallad.


289. _To pickle Oysters._

Take your great Oysters, and in opening them save the Liquor, then
strain it from dross, add to it some White Wine, and White Wine Vinegar,
and a little Salt, and so let them boil together a while, putting in
whole Mace, whole Cloves, whole Pepper, sliced Ginger, and quartered
Nutmegs, with a few Bay leaves; when the Liquor is boiled almost enough,
put in your Oysters and plump them, then lay them out to cool, then put
them into a Gally-pot or Barrel, and when the Liquor is cool, pour it
over them, and keep them from the Air.


290. _To make the best sort of Mustard._

Dry your Seed very well, then beat it by little and little at a time in
a Mortar, and sift it, then put the Powder into a Gally-pot, and wet it
with Vinegar very well, then put in a whole Onion, pilled but not cut,
a little Pepper beaten, a little Salt, and a lump of stone Sugar.


291. _Another sort of Mustard._

Dry your Horse-Radish Roots in an Oven very dry, then beat them to
Powder and sift them, and when you would use any, wet it with Wine
Vinegar, and so it will rather be better than the other.


292. _To keep boiled powdered Beef long after it is boiled._

When your Beef is well powdered, and boiled thorowly, and quite cold,
wrap it up close in a linnen cloth, and then a woollen one, and so keep
it in a Chest or Box from the Air.


293. _To make Clouted Cream._

Take three Gallons of new Milk, set it on the fire, and boil it, then
put in two Quarts of Cream, and stir it about for a while over the fire,
then pour it out into several pans, and cover it till the next morning,
then take it off carefully with a Skimmer, and put it all into one dish
one upon another, then eat it with Wine and Sugar.


294. _An excellent Damask Powder._

Take of Orrice half a Pound, Rose leaves four Ounces, Cloves one Ounce,
_Lignum Rhodium_ two Ounces, _Storax_ one Ounce and an half, _Benjamin_
one Ounce and an half, Musk and Civet of each ten Grains, beat them
altogether grosly, save the Rose leaves you must put in afterwards. This
is a very fine Powder to lay among Linnen.


_The End of the First Part._




THE

SECOND PART

OF

The Queen-like Closet:

Having an Addition of what hath already been treated of, and directing a
very true and excellent way for all manner of COOKERY, both FISH, FLESH,
and PASTRY;

_Shewing_,

The true SEASONING of all Things for Compleat TABLES:

_Also_

All Kinds of SAUCES & PICKLES, in a very brevious way.


Here is to be noted, that in divers of these Receipts there are
Directions for two or three several Things in one, not confounding the
Brains with multitudes of Words, to little or no purpose, or vain
Expressions of things with are altogether unknown to the Learned as well
as to the Ignorant: This is really imparted for the good of all the
FEMALE SEX.


By _Hannah Wolley_, alias _Chaloner_.


_London_, Printed for _R. Lowndes_. 1672




THE

Queen-like CLOSET,

OR

Rich Cabinet.


THE SECOND PART.


1. _To make Elder Vinegar and to colour it._

Take of your best white Wine Vinegar, and put such a quantity of ripe
Elder Berries into it as you shall think fit, in a wide mouth'd Glass,
stop it close, and set it in the Sun for about ten days, then pour it
out gently into another Glass, and keep it for your use; thus you may
make Vinegar of Red Roses, Cowslipps, Gilliflowers, or the like.


2. _To make Metheglin, either Brown or White, but White is best._

Take what quantity you please of Spring-Water, and make it so strong
with Honey that it will bear an Egg, then boil it very well, till a good
part be wasted, and put in to it boiling a good quantity of whole Spice,
Rosemary, Balm, and other cordial and pleasant Herbs or Flowers.

When it is very well boiled, set it to cool, it being strained from the
Herbs, and the Bag of Spices taken out;

When it is almost cold, put in a little Yest, and beat it well, then put
it into Vessels when it is quite cold, and also the Bag of Spice, and
when it hath stood a few days, bottle it up; if you would have it red,
you must put the Honey to strong Ale Wort in stead of Water.


3. _To make Collar'd Beef._

Take a good Flank of Beef, and lay it in Pump water and Salt, or rather
Saltpeter, one day and one night, then take Pepper, Mace, Nutmegs,
Ginger, and Cloves, with a little of the Herb called Tarragon, beat your
Spice, shred your Tarragon, and mingle these with some Suet beaten
small, and strew upon your Beef, and so rowl it up, and tie it hard, and
bake it in a pot with Claret Wine and Butter, let the pot be covered
close, and something in the pot to keep the Meat down in the Liquor that
it may not scorch, set it into the Oven with Houshold bread, and when it
is baked, take it out, and let it cool, then hang it up one night in the
Chimney before you eat it, and so as long as you please.

Serve it in with Bay Leaves, and eat it with Mustard and Sugar.


4. _To make Almond Puddings with French Rolls or Naples Biskets._

Take a Quart of Cream, boil it with whole Spice, then take it from the
Fire, and put in three Naples Biskets, or one Penny French Roll sliced
thin, and cover it up to scald; when it is cold, put in four Ounces of
sweet Almonds blanched, and beaten with Rosewater, the Yolks of eight
Eggs, and a little Marrow, with as much Sugar as you think fit, and a
little Salt; you may boil it, or bake it, or put it into Skins; if it be
boiled or baked, put Sugar on it when you serve it in.


5. _To make Barley Cream._

Take two Ounces of French Barley, and boil it in several Waters, then
take a quart of Cream, and boil it with whole Spice, put in your Barley,
and boil them together very well,

Then put in the yolks of six Eggs well beaten, and as much Sugar as you
think fit; stir them well over the fire, then poure it out, and when it
is cold serve it in; thus you may make Rice Cream, onely do not boil
that, but a very little in Milk, before you put it into the Cream.


6. _To make Cheese-cakes._

Take four Gallons of new Milk, set it with a little Runnet, and when it
is come, break it gently, and whey it very well, then take some Manchet,
first scalded well in new Milk, let the Milk be thick with it, and while
it is hot, put in a quarter of a pound of fresh Butter, and stir it in,
when it is cold, mix that and your curd together very well, then put in
one Pound and half of plumped Currans, some beaten Spice, a very little
Salt, Rosewater, and the yolks of eight Eggs, half a Pint of Cream, and
a little Sugar, mix them well together, then make some Paste, with
Flower, Butter, the yolk of an Egg and fair water, and roul it out thin,
and so bake them in bake-pans, and do not let them stand too long in the
Oven.


7. _Another way for Cheese-cakes._

Take the Curd of four Gallons of new Milk, and put thereto half a pound
of Almonds blanched and beaten fine with Rosewater, then put in one Pint
of Raw Cream, the yolks of ten Eggs, some beaten Spice, a little Salt,
one pound and half of plumped Currans, a little Rosewater, and some
Sugar, and so mix them very well, and put them into your Crust and bake
them.


8. _Another way for Cheese-cakes._

Take the Curd of four Gallons of new Milk, beat it well in a Mortar with
half a pound of fresh Butter, and then season it as you do the other
above-named.


9. _Another way for Cheese-cakes._

Take the same quantity of Curd, and mix it with half a Pound of Rice
boiled tender in Milk, one quarter of a pound of fresh Butter, the yolks
of eight Eggs, one Pint of Cream, beaten Spice, two pounds of Currans
first plumped, Rosewater and Sugar, and a little Salt, and so bake them,
not too much.


10. _To make fresh Cheese._

Take some very tender Cheese-Curd, stamp it very well in a Mortar with a
little Rosewater, wherein whole Spice hath been steeped, then let it
stand in a little Cullender about half an hour, then turn it out into
your Dish, and serve it to the Table with Cream, Wine, and Sugar.


11. _Another way for a fresh Cheese._

Take a quart of Cream, and boil in it whole Spice, then stir in the
yolks of eight Eggs, and four whites well beaten, and when they are hot,
put in so much Sack as will give it a good taste, then stir it over the
Fire till it runneth on a Curd, then beat it in a Mortar as the other,
and serve it to the Table with Cream and Sugar.


12. _To make Oatmeal Pudding._

Take Oatmeal beaten fine, put to it some Cream, beaten Spice, Rosewater
and Sugar, some Currans, some Marrow, or Beef Suet shred fine, and a
little Salt, then Butter your pan and bake it.


13. _Puddings in Balls to stew or to fry._

Take part of a Leg of Veal, parboil it, and shred it fine with some Beef
Suet, then take some Cream, Currans, Spice, Rosewater, Sugar and a
little Salt, a little grated Bread, and one handful of Flower, and with
the yolks of Eggs make them in Balls, and stew them between two Dishes,
with Wine and Butter, or you may make some of them in the shape of
Sausages, and fry them in Butter, so serve them to the Table with Sugar
strewed over them.


14. _To boil Pigeons._

Take your largest Pigeons and cut them in halves, wash them and dry
them, then boil a little water and Salt with some whole Spice, and a
little Faggot of sweet Herbs, then put in your Pigeons and boil them,
and when they are enough, take some boiled Parsley shred small, some
sweet Butter, Claret Wine, and an Anchovy, heat them together, then put
in the yolks of Eggs, and make it thick over the Fire, then put in your
Pigeons into a Dish, garnished with pickled Barberries and raw Parsley,
and so pour over them your Sawce, and serve it to the Table.


15. _To make an Apple Tansie._

Take a Quart of Cream, one Manchet grated, the yolks of ten Eggs, and
four Whites, a little Salt, some Sugar, and a little Spice, then cut
your Apples in round thin slices, and lay them into your Frying-Pan in
order, your Batter being hot, when your Apples are fried, pour in your
Butter, and fry it on the one side, then turn it on a Pie-Plate and
slide it into the Pan again, and fry it, then put it on a Pie-Plate, and
squeez the Juice of a Limon over it, and strew on fine Sugar, and serve
it so to the Table.


16. _To make a green Tansie to fry, or boil over a Pot._

Take a Quart of Cream, the yolks of one dozen of Eggs and half, their
Whites well beat, mix them together, and put in one Nutmeg grated, then
colour it well with the Juice of Spinage, and sweeten it with Sugar;
then fry it with Butter as you do the other, and serve it in the same
manner; but you must lay thin slices of Limon upon this.

If you will not fry it, then butter a Dish, and pour it therein, and set
it upon a Pot of boiling water till it be enough; this is the better
and easier way.

Thus you may make Tansies of any other things, as Cowslips, Rasberries,
Violets, Marigolds, Gilliflowers, or any such like, and colour them with
their Juice; you may use green Wheat instead of Spinage.


17. _To make an Amulet._

Take twelve Eggs, beat them and strain them, put to them three or four
spoonfuls of Cream, then put in a little Salt, and having your
frying-pan ready with some Butter very hot, pour it in, and when you
have fryed it a little, turn over both the sides into the middle, then
turn it on the other side, and when it is fryed, serve it to the table
with Verjuice, Butter and Sugar.


18. _To make a Chicken-Pie._

Make your Paste with cold Cream, Flower, Butter and the yolk of an Egg,
roul it very thin, and lay it in your Baking-pan, then lay Butter in the
Bottom.

Then lay in your Chickens cut in quarters with some whole Mace, and
Nutmeg sliced, with some Marrow, hard Lettuce, Eryngo Root, and Citron
Pill, with a few Dates stoned and sliced:

Then lay good store of Butter, Close up your Pie and Bake it:

Then Cut it open, and put in some Wine, Butter, and Sugar with the Yolks
of two or three Eggs well beaten together over the fire, till it be
thick, so serve it to the Table, and garnish your Dish with some pretty
Conceits made in Paste.


19. _To make a Collar of Brawn of a Breast of Pork._

Take a large Breast of Pork, and bone it, then roul it up, and tie it
hard with a Tape, then boil it water and Salt till it be very tender,
then make Souce drink for it with small Beer, Water and Salt, and keep
it in it:

Serve it to the Table with a Rosemary Branch in the middle of it, and
eat it with Mustard.


20. _To souce Veal to eat like Sturgeon._

Take what part of Veal you like best, and boil it with water and salt,
and a bundle of sweet herbs, and a little Limon Pill; when it is boiled
enough, put into your Liquor so much Vinegar as will make it tast sharp,
and a Limon sliced, and when it is cold, put in your Veal, and when it
hath lain four or five days, serve it to the Table with Fennel, and eat
it with some Vinegar; you must tie it up as you do Brawn.


21. _To make a Pasty of a Breast of Veal._

Take half a peck of fine Flower, and two pounds of Butter broken into
little bits, one Egg, a little Salt, and as much cold Cream, or Milk as
will make it into a Paste; when you have framed your Pasty, lay in your
Breast of Veal boned, and seasoned with a little Pepper and Salt, but
first you must lay in Butter.

When your Veal is laid in, then put in some large Mace, and a Limon
sliced thin, Rind and all, then cover it well with Butter, close it and
bake it, and when you serve it in, cut it up while it is very hot, put
in some white wine, sugar, the yolks of Eggs, and Butter being first
heated over the Fire together; this is very excellent meat.


22. _To make a Pigeon-Pie._

Make your Paste as for the Pasty, roul it thin, and lay it into your
baking-pan, then lay in Butter, then mix Pepper and Salt and Butter
together, and fill the bellies of your Pigeons, then lay them in, and
put in some large Mace, and little thin slices of Bacon, then cover them
with Butter, and close your Pie, and bake it not too much.


23. _To boil a Capon or Hen with Oysters._

Take either of them, and fill the Belly of it with Oysters, and truss
it, then boil it in white Wine, Water, the Liquor of the Oysters, a
Blade or two of Mace, a little Pepper whole, and a little Salt; when it
is boiled enough, take the Oysters out of the belly, and put them into a
Dish, then take some Butter, and some of the Liquor it was boiled in,
and two Anchoves with the yolks of Eggs well beaten, heat these together
over the fire, and then put your Oysters into it, then garnish your Dish
with Limon sliced thin, and some of the Oysters, also some pickled
Barberries and raw Parsley, then lay your Capon or Hen in the middle of
it, and pour the sauce upon the Breast of it, then lay on sliced Limon
and serve it in.


24. _To make an Olio._

First lay in your Dish a Fricasy made of a Calves-head, with Oisters and
Anchovies in it, then lay Marrow-bones round the Dish, within them lay
Pigeons boiled round the Dish, and thin slices of Bacon, lay in the
middle upon your Fricasy a powdred Goose boiled, then lay some
sweet-breads of Veal fryed, and balls of Sawsage-meat here and there,
with some Scotch Collops of Veal or of Mutton: Garnish your Dish with
Limon or Orange and some toasts for the Marrow so serve it in.


25. _To make Cracknels._

Take half a Pound of fine Flower, and as much fine Sugar, a few
Coriander seeds bruised, and some Butter rubbed into the Flower, wet it
with Eggs, Rosewater and Cream, make it into a Paste, and rowl it in
thin Cakes, then prick them and bake them; then wash them over with Egg
and a little Rosewater, then dry them again in the Oven to make them
crisp.


26. _To make good Sauce for a boiled Leg of Mutton._

Take the best Prunes and stew them well with white Wine or Claret, and
some whole Spice, then drain them into a Dish and set it over a Chafing
dish of Coles; put to it a little grated Bread, juice of Limon and a
little salt, then lay your Mutton in a Dish, being well boiled with
water and salt, pour your sauce to it:

Garnish your Dish with Limon, Barberries, Parsly, and so serve it in.


27. _To rost Pork without the Skin._

Take any joint of small Pork, not salted and lay it to the fire till the
Skin may be taken off, then take it from the fire and take off the Skin,
then stick it with Rosemary and Cloves, and lay it to the fire again,
then salt it and rost it carefully, then make Sauce for it with Claret
Wine, white bread sliced thin, a little water, and some beaten Cinamon;
boil these well together, then put in some Salt, a little Butter,
Vinegar, or Juice of Limon, and a little sugar, when your Pork is rosted
enough, then flower it, and lay it into a Dish with the Sauce, and
serve it in.


28. _To roste a Pig like Lamb._

Take a Pig--cut it in quarters, and truss it like quarters of Lamb, then
spit it, and rost it till you may take off the Skin, then take the Spit
from the fire, and take the skin clean off, then draw it with Parsly,
and lay it to the fire, baste it with Butter, and when it is enough,
flower it and serve it to the Table with Butter, the Juice of Orange,
and gross Pepper, and a little Salt.


29. _To make Codling Cream._

Take fair Codling Apples, and when you have scalded them very well, peel
them, and put them into warm water over a few Embers covered close till
they are very green, then take a quart of Cream and boil it with a blade
of Mace, and then bruise six of your Codlings very well, and when your
Cream is almost cold, put in your Codlings, and stir them very well over
a slow fire for fear they turn, then put in the yolks of Eggs well
beaten, and what Sugar you think fit, and let it be upon the fire,
stirring it till you think it be enough, then serve it in cold.


30. _A very dainty Summer Dish._

Set a little morning Milk with Runnet, as for a Cheese, when it is come,
slice it out with a thin Slice, and lay it into the Dish you mean to
serve it in, and put to it a little raw Cream, what Wine you please, and
some Sugar, and so eat it.


31. _To Butter Lobsters, Crabs or Crafish._

Take out their Meat and Mince it small, and set it over a Chafing dish
of Coals with a little white Wine, a little Salt, and a blade of Mace,
and when it is very hot, put in some Butter and some Crums of white
bread, then warm the shells against the fire, and fill them again with
their Meat, and so serve them in.

You may do Shrimps or Prawns thus, only you must not put them into the
shells, again, but garnish your Dish with them.


32. _To make a very good Cheese._

Take a Pail full of Morning Milk and Stroakings, and set it together
with two spoonfuls of Runnet, and cover it; when it is come, put it
into the wheying-Cloth gently, and break it as little as you can; when
the Whey is run clean from it, put it into the Vat, and turn it in the
Evening, next morning take it out and salt it a little, and turn it
twice a day upon a clean Board, and when it is a week old, lay it into
some Nettles, and that will mellow it.

Before you set your Milk, you may if you please, colour it with the
juice of Marigolds, Spinage or Sage.


33. _To boil a Rump of Beef._

Take a Rump of Beef a little salted, and boil it in as much Water, as
will cover it, and boil a Net full of hard Lettice with it, and when it
is boiled, take your hard Lettice, some Wine, either White or Claret,
some Gravie, some Butter and some Nutmeg, and warm them together; then
Dish your Meat, and pour your Sauce over it, and garnish your Dish with
Parsley.


34. _To make fritters of Liver or of any other Meat._

Take your Liver, Capon or Veal, parboil it, mince it small, and then put
to it some Cream, Eggs, Spice and Salt, and make it pretty thick, and so
fry them; you may add a little Flower if you will, serve them in with
beaten Spice and Sugar strewed over them.


35. _To make an Almond Pudding to be baked and Iced over._

Take a pound of Almonds blanched and beaten with Rosewater, the Yolks
and Whites of twelve Eggs well beaten and strained, then put in Sugar,
beaten Spice and Marrow, with a little Salt, not in too hot an Oven; let
this be baked; when it is baked, stick it full of blanched Almonds, and
Ice it over with Sugar, Rosewater, and the White of an Egg beaten
together, then set it into the Oven again, that the Ice may rise and
dry, then serve it to the Table with fine Sugar strewed upon the brims
of the Dish.


36. _To souce a Pig in Collars._

Take the two sides of a large fat Pig and bone them, then take Sage,
Salt and grated Nutmeg a good quantity, and strew all over the insides
of them, then roul them up hard, and tie them well with a Tape, then
boil them, and also the Head very well in Salt and Water till they be
tender; then take them out of the Liquor, and lay them to cool, then put
some Vinegar and a Limon sliced into your Liquor, and heat it again, and
when it is cold, put in your Collars and Head, and when they have lain a
week, serve them to the Table with Mustard.


37. _To bake Venison or Mutton to keep six or eight Months._

Take a haunch of Venison, or for want of it, take a large Leg of Mutton,
bone it, and stuff it well with gross Pepper, Cloves, Mace and Nutmeg
mingled, with Salt, then rub it all over with the like, then put it into
a Pot with good store of Butter, and bake it with Houshold Bread, and
let it be pasted over.

Then pour out all the Liquor, and when it is cold, take only the Fat,
and some more Butter, and melt them together in a Stone-Pot set into a
Kettle of boiling water, then pour it into the Pot to your Venison or
Mutton, and so keep it, slice it out, and serve it to the Table with
Mustard and Sugar, and garnish it with Bay Leaves.


38. _To pot Pigeons, or wild Fowl, or a Goose or Rabbits._

Take either of these, and fill their bellies with the before named
Spices and Salt and Butter, and rub them over with the same, then do
just as you do the Venison.


39. _To boil a large Pike and Eels together._

Take a large Pike, and gut him and wash him, and be sure to save what is
good within him, then take two great Eels and scowr them well, throw
away their Heads, gut them, and wash them well, and cut them in pieces,
then boil some white Wine and Water, Salt and sweet Herbs together, with
some whole Spice, and when it boils apace, put in your Fish, and when it
is enough, take some of the Liquor, two Anchovies, some Butter and some
Shrimps taken out of their Shells, and heat all these together, then put
in the yolks of two or three Eggs, and heat all together, then lay some
Sippets of French Bread into your Dish, and set over a Chafingdish of
Coals, and lay your Fish in order upon them, then pour your Sawce all
over it, and garnish your Dish with Shrimps, Barberries and raw Parsley,
so serve it to the Table very hot.


40. _To roste Eels with Bacon._

Take great Eels and scour them well, and throw away the Heads, gut them,
and cut them in pieces, then cut some fat Bacon very thin, and wrap them
in it, and some Bay Leaves, and so tie them fast to the Spit, and roste
them, and baste them well with Claret Wine and Butter, and when they are
enough dredge them over with grated bread, and serve them with Wine,
Butter, and Anchovies; Garnish your Dish as you please.


41. _To make a Pie with Eels and Oisters._

Make your Paste, and roul it thin, and lay it into your baking Pan, then
take great Eels and flay them, and gut them, cut them in pieces, and
wash them, and dry them, then lay some Butter into your Pie, and season
your Eels with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace, and lay them in,
then cover them all over with greast Oisters, and put in three or four
Bay Leaves, then put in more of your beaten Spices and Salt, then cover
them well with Butter, and put in two or three Spoonfuls of white Wine,
so close it and bake it, then serve it in hot to the Table.


42. _To make a Pie with Parsneps and Oisters very good._

Take your Parsneps tenderly boiled; and slice them thin, then having
your Paste ready laid in your baking-pan, put in a good store of Butter,
then lay in a Lay of Parsneps, and some large Mace, and Pepper cracked,
then some Oisters and Yolks of Eggs hard boiled, then more Spice and
butter, then more Parsneps, then more Oisters, then more hard Eggs, more
Spice, and cover it well, and bake it, and serve it in hot.


43. _To dress Artichoke Suckers._

Take your Suckers of Artichokes, and pare them as you would an Apple,
and cast them into water to keep their Colour; and to take away the
bitterness of them, put also to them the meat which is in the stalks of
great Artichokes, then boil Water and Salt together, and when it is
boiling apace, put in your Suckers and Stalks tied up in a thin Cloth
with a blade or two of Mace, and when they are enough, melt some Butter
and Vinegar together very thick and hot, and a little Pepper with it,
then lay them in a Dish, and pour the Sauce over them, strew on a little
Salt, and about the Dishes, and so serve it in.


44. _To boil Cucumbers._

Take your largest Cucumbers, and wash them and put them into boiling
water made quick with Salt, then when they are boiled enough, take them
and peel them and break them into a Cullender, and when the Water is
well drained from them, put them into a hot Dish, and pour over them
some Butter and Vinegar a little Pepper and Salt, strew Salt on your
Dish brims, lay some of the Rind of them about the Dish cut in several
Fancies, and so serve them to the Table.


45. _To make several Sallads, and all very good._

Take either the stalks of Mallows, or Turnip stalks when they run to
seed, or stalks of the herb Mercury with the seedy head, either of these
while they are tender put into boiling Water and Salt, and boiled
tender, and then Butter and Vinegar over them.


46. _To make a Sallad of Burdock, good for the Stone, another of the
tender stalks of Sow-thistles._

Take the inside of the Stalks of Burdock, and cut them in thin slices,
and lay them in water one whole day, shifting them sometimes, then boil
them, and butter them as you do the forenamed.

Also the tender Stalks of Sow-thistles done in like manner, are very
good and wholsome.


47. _To make a Tart of Spinage._

Take a good quantity of green Spinage, boil it in water and salt, and
drain it well in a Cullender, then put to it plumped Currans, Nutmeg,
Salt, Sugar and Butter, with a little Cream, and the yolks of hard Eggs
beaten fine, then having your Paste ready laid in your baking-pan, lay
in a little butter, and then your Spinage, and then a little Butter
again; so close it, and bake it, and serve it to the Table hot, with
Sugar strewed over it.


48. _Artichoke Cream._

Take the tender bottoms of Artichokes, and beat them in a Mortar, and
pick out all the strings, then boil a quart of Cream with large Mace and
Nutmeg, then put in your bottoms, and when they have boiled a while, put
in the yolks of six Eggs well beaten, and so much Sugar as you think
fit, and heat them together over the fire, then pour it into a Dish, and
when it is cold serve it in with Sugar strewed over it.


49. _To make very fine Rolls for Noble Tables._

Take half a Peck of fine Flower, the yolks of 4 Eggs and a little Salt,
with a Pint of Ale yest, mix them together, and make them into a Paste
with warm Milk and a little Sack, them mould it well, and put it into a
warm Cloth to rise, when your Oven is hot, mould it again, and make it
into little Rolls, and bake them, then rasp them, and put them into the
Oven again for a while, and they will eat very crisp and fine.


50. _To make short Rolls._

Take half a peck of fine Flower, and break into it one pound and half of
fresh Butter very small, then bruised Coriander seeds, and beaten Spice
with a very little Salt and some Sugar, and a Pint of Ale-yest, mix them
well together, and make them into a Paste with warm Milk and Sack:

Then lay into it a warm Cloth to rise, and when your Oven is hot, make
it into Rolls, and prick them, and bake them, and when they are baked,
draw them and cover them till they be cold; these also eat very finely,
if you butter some of them while they are hot.


51. _To dress Soals a fine way._

Take one pair of your largest Soals, and flay them on both sides, then
fry them in sweet Suet tried up with Spice, Bay leaves, and Salt, then
lay them into a Dish, and put into them some Butter, Claret Wine and two
Anchovies, cover them with another Dish, and set them over a Chafingdish
of Coals, and let them stew a while, then serve them to the Table,
garnish your Dish with Orange or Limon, and squeeze some over them.


52. _To stew Fish in the Oven._

Take Soals, Whitings or Flounders, and put them into a Stew-pan with so
much water as will cover them, with a little Spice and Salt, a little
white Wine or Claret, some Butter, two Anchovies, and a bundle of sweet
herbs, cover them and set them into an Oven not too hot; when they are
enough, serve them in; Garnish your Dish wherein they lie with
Barberries, raw Parsley, and slices of Limon, and lay Sippets in the
bottom.


53. _To bake Collops of Bacon and Eggs._

Take a Dish and lay a Pie-plate therein, then lay in your Collops of
Bacon, and break your Eggs upon them.

Then lay on Parsley, and set them into an Oven not too hot, and they
will be rather better than fried.


54. _To make Furmity._

Take some new Milk or Cream, and boil it with whole Spice, then put in
your Wheat or Pearl Barley boiled very tender in several Waters, when it
hath boiled a while, thicken it with the yolks of Eggs well beaten, and
sweeten it with Sugar, then serve it in with fine Sugar on the Brims of
the Dish.


55. _To make Barly Broth._

Take French Barley boiled in several waters, and to a Pound of it, put
three quarts of water, boil them together a while with some whole Spice,
then put in as many Raisins of the Sun and Currans as you think fit,
when it is well boiled, put in Rosewater, Butter and Sugar, and so eat
it.


56. _To make Barley Broth with Meat._

Take a Knuckle of Veal, and the Crag-end of a Neck of Mutton, and boil
them in water and salt, then put in some Barly, and whole Spice, and
boil them very well together, then put in Raisins stoned, and Currans,
and a few Dates stoned and sliced thin; when it is almost enough, put in
some Cream, and boil it a while, then put in plumped Prunes, and the
yolks of Eggs, Rosewater and Sugar, and a little Sack, so serve it in;
Garnsh your Dish with some of the Raisins and Prunes and fine Sugar;
this is very good and nourishing for sick or weak people.


57. _To make Furmity with Meat-Broth._

Boil a Leg of Beef in water and salt, and put in a little whole Spice;
when it is boiled tender; take it up, and put into the Broth some Wheat
ready boiled, such as they sell in the Market, and when that hath boiled
a while, put in some Milk, and let that boil a while, then thicken it
with a little Flower, or the yolks of Eggs, then sweeten it with Sugar,
and eat it.


58. _To make Furmity with Almonds._

Take three Quarts of Cream, and boil it with whole Spice, then put in
some pearled Barley first boiled in several waters, and when they have
boiled together a while, then put in so many blanched Almonds beaten
fine with Rosewater, as you think may be enough, about four Ounces of
Barly to this quantity of Cream will be enough, and four Ounces of
Almonds, boil them well together, and sweeten it with Sugar, and so
serve it in, or eat it by the way, you may put in Saffron if you please.


59. _To make a hasty Pudding._

Take one quart of Cream and boil it, then put in two Manchets grated,
and one pound almost of Currans plumped, a little Salt, Nutmeg and
Sugar, and a little Rosewater, and so let them boil together, stirring
them continually over the Fire, till you see the butter arise from the
Cream, and then pour it into a Dish and serve it in with fine Sugar
strewed on the brims of the Dish.


60. _Another way to make a hasty Pudding._

Take good new milk and boil it, then put in Flower, plumped Currans,
beaten spice, Salt and Sugar, and stir it continually till you find it
be enough, then serve it in with Butter and Sugar, and a little Wine if
you please.


61. _To make Spanish Pap._

Boil a quart of Cream with a little whole Spice, when it is well boiled,
take out the Spice, and thicken it with Rice Flower, and when it is
well boiled, put in the yolks of Eggs, and Sugar and Rosewater, with a
very little Salt, so serve it to the Table either hot or cold, with fine
Sugar strewed on the brims of the Dish.


62. _To make Gravie Broth._

Take a good fleshy piece of Beef, not fat, and lay it down to the fire,
and when it begins to rost, slash it with a Knife to let the Gravie run
out, and continually bast it with what drops from it and Claret Wine
mixed together, and continually cut it, and bast it till all the Gravie
be out, then take this Gravie and set it over a Chafingdish of Coals
with some whole Spice, Limon Pill, and a little Salt, when you think it
is enough, lay some Sippets into another Dish, and pour it in, and serve
it to the Table; Garnish your Dish with Limon and Orange; if you please
you may leave out the Sippets and put in some poach'd Eggs, done
carefully.


63. _To make French Pottage._

Take an equal quantity of Chervil, hard Lettice and Sorrel, or any other
Herb as you like best, in all as much as a Peck will hold pressed down,
pick them well, and wash them, and drain them from the water, then put
them into a Pot with half a pound of fresh Butter, and set them over the
fire, and as the Butter melts, stir them down in it till they are all
within the Butter, then put some water in, and a Crust of bread, with
some whole Cloves and a little Salt, and when it is well boiled, take
out the Crust of bread, and put in the yolks of four Eggs well beaten,
and stir them together over the fire, then lay some thin slices of white
bread into a deep dish, and pour it in.


64. _To make Cabbage Pottage._

Take a Leg of Beef and a Neck of Mutton, and boil them well in water and
salt, then put in good store of Cabbage cut small, and some whole Spice,
and when it is boiled enough, serve it in.


65. _To make a Sallad of cold meat._

Take the brawn of a cold Capon, or a piece of cold Veal, and mince it
very small, with some Limon pill, then put in some Oil, Vinegar, Capers,
Caviare, and some Anchovies, and mix them very well, then lay it in a
Dish in the form of a Star, and serve it in; Garnish your Dish with
Anchovies, Limon and Capers.


66. _To dry a Goose._

Take a fair fat Goose, and powder it about a Month or thereabouts, then
hang it up in a Chimney as you do Bacon, and when it is throughly dry,
boil it well and serve it to the Table with some Mustard and Sugar,
Garnish your Dish with Bay leaves: Hogs Cheeks are very good dried thus.


67. _To dress Sheeps Tongues with Oysters._

Take your Sheeps Tongues about six of them, and boil them in water and
salt till they be tender, then peel them, and slice them thin, then put
them into a Dish with a quart of great Oisters; a little Claret wine
and some whole Spice, let them stew together a while, then put in some
Butter and the yolks of three Eggs well beaten, shake them well
together, then lay some Sippets into a Dish, and put your Tongues upon
them; Garnish your Dish with Oisters, Barberries, and raw Parsley, and
serve it in.


68. _To make a Neats-tongue Pie._

Let two small Neats tongues or one great one be tenderly boiled, then
peel them and slice them very thin, season them with Pepper and Salt,
and Nutmeg; then having your Paste ready laid into your baking-pan, lay
some Butter in the bottom, then lay in your Tongues, and one pound of
Raisins of the Sun, with a very little Sugar, then lay in more butter,
so close it and bake it, then cut it up, and put in the yolks of three
Eggs, a little Claret Wine and Butter, stir it well together, and lay on
the Cover, and serve it; you may add a little Sugar if you please.


69. _A Capon with white Broth._

Take a large Capon, and draw him, and truss him, and boil him in water
and a little salt, with some whole Spice:

When you think it is almost enough, put in one pound of Currans well
washed and picked, four Ounces of Dates stoned and diced thin, and when
they have boiled enough, put in half a pound of sweet Almonds blanched
and beaten fine with Rose-water, strain them in with some of the Liquor,
then put in some Sack and Sugar; then lay some thin slices of white
bread into a deep Dish, and lay your Capon in the midst, then pour your
Broth over it.

Garnish your dish with plumped Raisins and Prunes, and serve it in.


70. _To make a Calvesfoot Pie._

Take six Calves feet tenderly boiled, and cut them in halves, then make
some Paste with fine Flower, Butter, cold Cream and the yolk and white
of one Egg, rowl it very thin, and lay it into your baking-pan, then lay
some butter in the bottom, and then your Calves feet with some large
Mace, half a pound of Raisins of the Sun, half a pound of Currans, then
lay more butter and close it and bake it, then cut it up, and put in the
yolks of three Eggs, some white Wine, Butter and a little Salt, and so
serve it to the Table; Garnish your Dish with pretty Conceits made in
Paste, and baked a little.


71. _To make an Artichoke Pie._

Make your Paste as before named, and roul it thin, and lay it into your
baking-pan.

Then lay in Butter sliced thin, and then your bottoms of Artichokes
tenderly boiled, season it with a little Salt, a little gross Pepper,
and some sliced Nutmeg, with a blade or two of Mace and a little Sugar,
then lay in some Marrow, Candied Orange and Citron Pill, with some
Candied Eringo Roots; then cover it with butter, and close it with your
Paste, and so bake it, then cut it up, and put in white Wine, Butter,
and the yolks of Eggs and Sugar; cover it again, and serve it to the
Table.


72. _To make an Oyster-Pie._

Make your Paste as before, and lay it in your Pan, then lay in Butter,
and then put in as many great Oysters as will almost fill your Pan, with
their Liquor strained, some whole Pepper, Mace and Nutmeg; then lay in
Marrow and the Yolks of hard Eggs, so cover them with Butter, close
them, and bake your Pie, then put in White Wine, Anchovies, Butter and
the Yolks of Eggs; cover it again and serve it the Table.


73. _To make a Pig-Pie._

Take a large Pig and slit it in two, and bone it, onely the two sides,
not the head, then having your Paste ready laid in your Pan, and some
Butter in the bottom, lay in your Pig, season it with Pepper, Salt,
Nutmeg and Mace, and one handful of Sage shred small and mixed with the
Spice and Salt, then lay in more Butter, close it, and bake it.

Serve it in cold with Mustard, and garnish your Dish with Bay Leaves.

If you would eat it hot, you must leave out the Pepper and some of the
Salt, and put in store of Currans, and when it comes out of the Oven,
put in some Butter, Vinegar, and Sugar, and so serve it.


74. _To make a Rasberry Tart._

Take some Puff-paste rolled thin, and lay it into your Baking-Pan, then
lay in your Rasberries and cover them with fine Sugar, then close your
Tart and bake it; then cut it up, and put in half a Pint of Cream, the
yolks of two or three Eggs well beaten, and a little Sugar; then serve
it in cold with the Lid off, and sugar strewed upon the brims of the
Dish.


75. _To make a Carp Pie._

Have your Paste ready laid in your bake-pan, and some Butter in the
bottom.

Then take a large Carp, scale him, gut him, and wash him clean, and dry
him in a Cloth, then lay him into your Pan with some whole Cloves, Mace,
and sliced Nutmeg, with two handfuls of Capers, then put in some White
Wine, and mix some Butter with Salt, and lay all over; then close it,
and bake it; this is very good to be eaten either hot or cold.


76. _To boil a Goose or Rabbits with Sausages._

Take a large Goose a little powdered, and boil it very well, or a couple
of Rabbits trussed finely; when either of these are almost boiled, put
in a Pound of Sausages, and boil them with them, then lay either of
these into a Dish, and the Sausages here and there one, with some thin
Collops of Bacon fryed, then make for Sauce, Mustard and Butter, and so
serve it in.


77. _To make a Fricasie of Veal, Chicken, or Rabbits, or of any thing
else._

Take either of these and cut them into small pieces, then put them into
a frying pan with so much water as will cover them with a little salt,
whole Spice, Limon Pill and a bundle of sweet herbs, let them boil
together till the Meat be tender, then put in some Oysters, and when
they are plumped, take a little Wine, either White or Claret, and two
Anchovies dissolved therein with some Butter, and put all these to the
rest, and when you think your Meat is enough, take it out with a little
Skimmer, and put it into a Dish upon Sippets; then put into your Liquor
the yolks of Eggs well beaten, and mix them over the fire, then pour it
all over your Meat; Garnish your Dish with Barberries, and serve it in;
this Dish you may make of raw meat or of cold meat which hath been left
at Meals.


78. _To make Scotch Collops of Veal or Mutton._

Take your meat and slice it very thin, and beat it with a rolling-pin,
then hack it all over, and on both sides with the back of a Knife, then
fry it with a little Gravie of any Meat, then lay your Scotch Collops
into a Dish over a Chafingdish of Coals, and dissolve two Anchovies in
Claret Wine, and add to it some butter and the yolks of three Eggs well
beaten, heat them together, and pour it over them:

Then lay in some thin Collops of Bacon fryed, some Sausage meat fried,
and the yolks of hard Eggs fryed after they are boiled, because they
shall look round and brown, so serve it to the Table.


79. _To make a Pudding of a Manchet._

Take a Manchet, put it into a Posnet, and fill the Posnet up with Cream,
then put in Sugar and whole Spice, and let it boil leisurely till all
the Cream be wasted away, then put it into a Dish, and take some
Rosewater, and Butter and Sugar, and pour over it, so serve it in with
fine Sugar strewed all over it.

Your Manchet must be chipped before you put it into the Cream.


80. _To make a Calves head Pie._

Make your Paste, and lay it into your Pan as before, then lay in Butter,
and then your Calves Head, being tenderly boiled, and cut in little thin
bits, and seasoned with Pepper, Salt and Nutmeg, then put in some
Oysters, Anchovies and Claret Wine, with some yolks of hard Eggs and
Marrow, then cover it with Butter, and close it and bake it; when it is
baked, eat it hot.


81. _To dry Tongues._

Take some Pump water and Bay salt, or rather refined Saltpeter, which is
better; make a strong Brine therewith, and when the Salt is well melted
in it, put in your Tongues, and let them lie one Week, then put them
into a new Brine, made in the same manner, and in that let them lie a
week longer, then take them out, and dry-salt them with Bay Salt beaten
small, till they are as hard as may be, then hang them in the Chimney
where you burn Wood, till they are very dry, and you may keep them as
long as you please; when you would eat of them, boil them with
[Transcriber's note: word missing] in the Pot as well as Water, for that
will make them look black, and eat tender, and look red within; when
they are cold, serve them in with Mustard and Sugar.


82. _To make Angelot Cheese._

Take some new Milk and strokings together, the quantity of a Pail full,
put some Runnet into it, and stir it well about, and cover it till your
Cheese be come, then have ready narrow deep Moats open at both ends,
and with your flitting Dish fill your Moats as they stand upon a board,
without breaking or wheying the Cheese, and as they sink, still fill
them up, and when you see you can turn them, which will be about the
next day, keep them with due turning twice in a day, and dry them
carefully, and when they are half a year old, they will be fit to be
eat.


83. _To make a Hare-Pie._

Take the flesh of a very large Hare, and beat it in a Mortar with as
much Marrow or Beef Suet as the Hare contains, then put in Pepper, Salt,
Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace, as much as you judge to be fit, and beat it
again till you find they be well mixed, then having your Paste ready in
your Baking-Pan, lay in some Butter, and then your Meat, and then Butter
again; so close it, and bake it, and when it is cold, serve it in with
Mustard and Sugar, and garnish your Dish with Bay leaves; this will keep
much longer than any other Pie.


84. _To rost a Shoulder of Venison or of Mutton in Bloud._

Take the Bloud of either the Deer or the Sheep, and strain it, and put
therein some grated Bread and Salt, and some Thyme plucked from the
Stalks, then wrap your Meat in it and rost it, and when you see the
bloud to be dry upon it, baste it well with butter, and make sauce for
it with Claret Wine, Crums of Bread and Sugar, with some beaten Cinamon,
salt it a little in the rosting, but not too much; you may stick it with
Rosemary if you will.


85. _To stew a Pig._

Lay a large Pig to the Fire, and when it is hot, skin it, and cut it
into divers pieces, then take some white wine and strong broth, and stew
it therein with an Onion or two cut very small, a little Pepper, Salt,
Nutmeg, Thyme, and Anchovies, with some Elder Vinegar, sweet Butter and
Gravie; when it is enough, lay Sippets of French Bread in your Dish, and
put your Meat thereon.

Garnish your Dish with Oranges and Limons.


86. _To make a Fricasie of Sheeps feet._

Take your Sheeps feet tenderly boiled, and slit them, and take out the
knot of hair within, then put them into a Frying-pan with as much water
as will cover them, a little Salt, Nutmeg, a blade of Mace, and a bundle
of sweet herbs, and some plumped Currans; when they are enough, put in
some Butter, and shake them well together, then lay Sippets into a Dish,
and put them upon them with a Skimmer, then put into your Liquor a
little Vinegar, the yolks of two or three Eggs, and heat it over the
fire, and pour it over them; Garnish your Dish with Barberries, and
serve it to the Table.


87. _To make a Steak-Pie with Puddings in it._

Lay your Paste ready in your Pan, and lay some butter in the bottom,
then lay a Neck of Mutton cut into steaks thereon, then take some of the
best of a Leg of Mutton minced small, with as much Beef Suet as Mutton;
season it with beaten Spice and Salt, and a little Wine, Apples shred
small, a little Limon Pill, a little Verjuice and Sugar, then put in
some Currans, and when they are well mixed, make it into Balls with the
yolks of Eggs, and lay them upon the steaks, then put in some Butter and
close your Pie and bake it, and serve it in hot.


88. _To dress Salmon or other Fish by Infusion, a very good way._

Take a Joul of Salmon, or a Tail, or any other part, or any other Fish
which you like, put it into a Pot or Pan, with some Vinegar, Water and
Salt, Spice, sweet herbs, and white Wine; when it is enough, lay it into
a Dish, and take some of the Liquor with an Anchovie or two, a little
Butter and the yolks of Eggs beaten; heat these over the fire, and poure
over your Fish; if you please, you may put in shrimps, but then you must
put in the more Butter; Garnish your Dish with some Limon or Orange, and
some Shrimps.


89. _To make Loaves to Butter._

Take the yolks of twelve Eggs, and six Whites, a little Yeast, Salt and
beaten Ginger, wet some Flower with this, and make it into a Paste, let
it lie to rise a while, and then make it into Loaves, and prick them,
and bake them, then put in white wine and butter and sugar, and serve it
in.


90. _To make a Calves Chaldron Pie, and Puddings also of it._

Take a fat Calves Chaldron boiled tender, and shred it very small, then
season it with beaten spice and salt:

Then put in a pound of Currans and somewhat more, and as much Sugar as
you think fit, and a little Rosewater; then having your Pie ready, fill
it with this, and press it down; close it and bake it, then put some
Wine into it, and so eat it.

If you will make Puddings of it, you must add a little Cream and grated
bread, a little Sack, more Sugar, and the yolks of Eggs, and so you may
bake them, or boil, or fry them.


91. _To make Rice-Cream._

Boil a quart of Cream, then put in two handfuls of Rice Flower, and a
little fine Flower, as much Sugar as is fit, the yolk of an Egg, and
some Rosewater.


92. _To make a Pompion-Pie._

Having your Paste ready in your Pan, put in your Pompion pared and cut
in thin slices, then fill up your Pie with sharp Apples, and a little
Pepper, and a little Salt, then close it, and bake it, then butter it,
and serve it in hot to the Table.


93. _To fry Pompion._

Cut it in thin slices when it is pared, and steep it in Sack a while,
then dip it in Eggs, and fry it in Butter, and put some Sack and Butter
for Sauce, so serve it in with salt about the Dish brims.


94. _To make Misers for Children to eat in Afternoons in Summer._

Take half a Pint of good small Beer, two spoonfuls of Sack, the Crum of
half a penny Manchet, two handfuls of Currans washed clean and dried,
and a little of grated Nutmeg, and a little Sugar, so give it to them
cold.


95. _To fry Toasts._

Take a twopenny white Loaf, and pare away the Crust, and cut thin slices
of it, then dip them first in Cream, then in the yolks of Eggs well
beaten, and mixed with beaten Cinamon, then fry them in Butter, and
serve them in with Verjuice, Butter and Sugar.


96. _To boil or rather stew Carps in their own Blood._

Take two fair Carps, and scowr them very well from slime with water and
a little salt, then lay them in a Dish and open their bellies, take away
their Guts, and save the Blood and Rows in the Dish, then put in a Pint
of Claret Wine, some whole Spice and some Salt, with a little
Horse-Radish Root, then cover them close, and let them stew over a
Chafingdish of Coals, and when they are enough, lay them into a Dish
which must be rubbed with a Shelots, and Sippets laid in, then take a
little of the Liquor, and an Anchovie or two, with a little Butter, heat
them together, and pour it over them, then garnish your Dish with
Capers, Oranges or Limons, and serve it in very hot.


97. _To make Fritters._

Take half a Pint of Sack and a Pint of Ale, a little Yest, the yolks of
twelve Eggs, and six Whites, with some beaten Spice and a very little
salt, make this into thick Batter with fine Flower, then boil your Lard,
and dip round thin slices of Apples in this Batter, and fry them; serve
them in with beaten spice and sugar.


98. _To pickle Coleflowers._

Take some white wine Vinegar and salt, with some whole Spice, boil them
together very well, then put in your Coleflowers, and cover them, and
let them stand upon Embers for one hour, then take them out, and when
they are cold, put them into a Pot, and boil the Liquor again with more
Vinegar, and when it is cold, put it to them, and keep them close from
the Air.


99. _To preserve Orange or Limon Pills in thin slices in Jelly._

Take the most beautiful and thickest Rinds, and then cut them in halves,
and take their Meat clean out, then boil them in several waters till a
straw will run through them, then wash them in cold water, and pick them
and dry them:

Then take to a Pound of these, one quart of water wherein thin slices of
Pippins have been boiled, and that the water feels slippery, take to
this water three pounds of Sugar, and make thereof a Syrup, then put in
your Pills and scald them, and set them by till the next day, then boil
them till you find that the Syrup will jelly, then lay your Pills into
your Glasses, and put into your Syrup the Juice of three Oranges and one
Limon; then boil it again till it be a stiff Jelly, and put it to them.


100. _To make Cakes of the Pulp of Limons, or rather the Juice of
Limons._

Take out all the juice part of the Limon without breaking the little
skins which hold it, then boil some Sugar to a Candy height, and put in
this Juice, and stir it about, and immediately put it into a warm Stove,
and put in fire twice or thrice a day; when you see that it doth Candy
on the one side, then turn them out of the Glasses with a wet knife on
the other upon a sleeked Paper, and then let that candy also, and put
them up in a Box with Papers between them.


101. _To make good minced Pies._

Take one pound and half of Veal parboiled, and as much Suet, shred them
very fine, then put in 2 pound of Raisins, 2 pound of Currans, 1 pound
of Prunes, 6 Dates, some beaten Spice, a few Caraway seeds, a little
Salt, Verjuice, Rosewater and Sugar, to fill your Pies, and let them
stand one hour in the Oven:

When they go to Table strew on fine Sugar.


102. _To make a Loaf of Curds._

Take the Curds of three quarts of Milk rubbed together with a little
Flower, then put in a little beaten Ginger, and a little Salt, half a
Pint of Yest, the yolks of ten Eggs, and three Whites: work these into a
stiff Paste with so much Flower as you see fit, then lay it to rise in a
warm Cloth a while, then put in Butter, Sugar, Sack, and some beaten
Spice, and so serve it in.


103. _To make Cheese Loaves._

Take the Curds of three quarts of Milk, and as much grated Bread as
Curd, the yolks of twelve Eggs, and six Whites, some Cream, a little
Flower, and beaten Spice, a little Salt, and a little Sack; when you
have made it in a stiff Paste with a little flower, roul some of it thin
to fry, and serve them in with beaten Spice and Sugar strewed over them.

Then make the rest into a Loaf, and bake it, then cut it open, and serve
it in with Cream, Butter and Sugar.


104. _To fry Oysters._

Take of your largest Oysters, wash them and dry them, and beat an Egg or
two very well, and dip them in that, and so fry them, then take their
Liquor, and put an Anchovy to it, and some Butter, and heat them
together over the fire, and having put your fryed Oysters in a Dish,
pour the Sawce over them and serve them in.


105. _To broil Oysters._

Take your largest Oysters, and put them into Scollop Shells, or into the
biggest Oyster shells with their own Liquor, and set them upon a
Gridiron over Charcoals, and when you see they be boiled in the Liquor,
put in some Butter, a few Crums of Bread, and a little Salt, then let
them stand till they are very brown, and serve them to the Table in the
Shells upon a Dish and Pie-Plate.


106. _To rost Oysters._

Take the largest, and spit them upon little long sticks, and tie them to
the Spit, then lay them down to the fire, and when they are dry, bast
them with Claret Wine, and put into your Pan two Anchovies, and two or
three Bay-leaves, when you think they are enough, bast them with Butter,
and dredge them, and take a little of that liquor in the Pan, and some
Butter, and heat it in a Porringer, and pour over them.


107. _To make most excellent and delicate Pies._

Take two Neats tongues tenderly boiled, and peel them, and mince them
small with some Beef Suet or Marrow, then take a pound of Currans and a
pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned, some beaten Spice, Rosewater, a
little Salt, a little Sack and Sugar.

Beat all these with the minced meat in a Mortar till it come to a
perfect Paste, then having your Paste ready laid in your baking-Pan,
fill it or them with this meat, then lay on the top some sliced Dates,
and so close them, and bake them, when they are cold they will cut
smooth like Marmalade.


108. _To make fine Custards._

Take two quarts of Cream and boil it well with whole Spice, then put in
the yolks of twelve Eggs, and six Whites well beaten and strained, then
put in these Eggs over the fire, and keep them stirring lest they turn,
then when they are thoroughly hot, take it off and stir it till it be
almost cold, then put in Rosewater and Sugar, and take out the whole
Spice, then put your Custard into several things to bake, and do not let
them stand too long in the Oven; when you serve them in, strew on small
French Comfits of divers colours, or else fine Sugar, which you please.


109. _To make a Stump Pie._

Take a pound of Veal and as much Suet, parboil your Veal, and shred them
together, but not very small, then put in one pound of Raisins, one
pound of Currans, four Ounces of Dates stoned and sliced thin, some
beaten Spice, Rosewater and Sugar, and a little Salt, then take the
yolks of Eggs well beaten, and mix amongst the rest of the things very
well, then having your Pie ready, fill it and press it down, then lid
it, and bake it.


110. _To make Egg-Pies._

Take the yolks of eight hard Eggs, and shred them small with their
weight of Beef Suet minced very small also, then put in one pound of
Currans, four Ounces of Dates stoned and sliced, some beaten Spice,
Limon pill, Rosewater and Sugar, and a little Salt, mix them well
together, if you please, you may put in an Apple shred small, so fill
your Pies and bake them, but not too much, serve them to the Table with
a little Wine.


111. _To make hashed Meat._

Take a Leg or Shoulder of Mutton, lay it down to the fire, and as it
doth rost, cut it off in little bits, and let it lie in the Pan, bast it
with Claret wine and Butter, and a little Salt, and put two or three
Shelots in your Pan, when you have cut off so much as you can, lay the
bones into a Dish over a Chafingdish of Coals, and put your Meat to it
with the Liquor, and two Anchovies, cover it, and let it stew a while;
when it is enough, put in some Capers, and serve it in with Sippets;
Garnish your Dish with Olives and Capers, and Samphire; thus you may do
with any cold meat between two Dishes.


112. _To make a Fricasie of Oysters._

Take a quart of Oysters and put them into a frying pan with some white
Wine and their own Liquor, a little Salt, and some whole Spice, and two
or three Bay Leaves, when you think they be enough, lay them in a dish
well warmed, then add to their Liquor two Anchovies, some Butter, and
the yolks of four Eggs; Garnish your Dish with Barberries.


113. _To make a Fricasie of Eels._

Take a midling sort of Eels, scour them well, and cut off the heads and
throw them away, then gut them, and cut them in pieces, then put them
into a frying pan with so much white Wine and water as will cover them,
then put in whole Spice, a bundle of sweet herbs and a little Salt, let
them boil, and when they be very tender, take them up and lay them into
a warm Dish, then add to their Liquor two Anchovies, some Butter and
the yolks of Eggs, and pour over them:

Thus you may make Fricasies of Cockles or of Shrimps, or Prawns.

Garnish your Dish with Limon and Barberries.


114. _To make an Eel-Pie._

Take your largest Eels, and flay them, and cut them in pieces, then
having your Pie ready with Butter in the bottom, season your Eels with
Pepper, Salt and Nutmeg, then lay them in and cover them with Butter, so
close it and bake it, if you please, you may put in some Raisins of the
Sun, and some large Mace, it is good hot or cold.


115. _To souce an Eel and Collar it._

Take a very large fat Eel and scour it well, throw away the head and gut
her, and slit her down the back, season her with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg
and Mace, then boil her in white Wine, and Salt and Water, with a bundle
of sweet herbs and some Limon Pill, when it is well boiled, take it up
and lay it to cool; then put good store of Vinegar into the Liquor, and
when it is cold, put in your Eel, and keep it:

You must roul it up in a Collar and tie it hard with a Tape, and sew it
up in a Cloth, then put it in to boil; when it hath lain a week, serve
it to the Table with a Rosemary Branch in the middle, and Bay Leaves
round the Dish sides, eat it with Mustard.


116. _To stew Eels._

Take them without their heads, flay them and cut them in pieces, then
fill a Posnet with them, and set them all on end one by one close to one
another, and put in so much White Wine and Water as will cover them,
then put in good store of Currans to them, whole Spice, sweet herbs, and
a little Salt, cover them and let them stew, and when they are very
tender, put in some Butter, and so shake them well, and serve them upon
Sippets; Garnish your Dish with Orange or Limon and raw Parsley.


117. _To make a Herring Pie._

Take four of the best pickled Herrings, and skin them, then split them
and bone them, then having your Pie in readiness with Butter in the
bottom, then lay your Herrings in halves into your Pie one lay of them,
then put in Raisins, Currans and Nutmeg, and a little Sugar, then lay in
more Butter, then more Herrings, Fruit and Spice, and more Butter, and
so close it, and bake it; your Herrings must be well watered.


118. _To rost a Pike and to lard it._

Take a large Pike, and scale it, gut it, and wash it clean, then lard it
on the back with pickled Herring and Limon Pill, then spit it and lay it
down to the fire to rost, bast it often with Claret Wine and Butter,
when it is enough, make Sauce for it with Claret Wine and Butter, and
serve it in.


119. _To boil fresh Salmon._

Take a Joll or a Tail of fresh Salmon, then take Vinegar and Water, Salt
and whole Spice, and boil them together, then put in your Salmon, and
when it is boiled, take some Butter and some of the Liquor with an
Anchovie or two, and a little white Wine and a quart of Shrimps out of
their Shells, heat these together, and so Dish your Salmon, and pour
this over it.

Garnish your Dish with Shrimps and Anchovies, and Slices of Limon.


120. _To boil a Cods Head._

Boil Wine, Water and Salt together, with whole Spice and sweet herbs,
and a little Horse-Radish Root, then put in your Cods head, and boil it
very well, then drain it well from the Water, and lay it in a dish over
a Chafingdish of Coals:

Then take some of the Liquor and two Anchovies, some butter and some
Shrimps, heat them over the fire, and pour over it, then poach some Eggs
and lay over it, and also about the Brims of the Dish; Garnish your Dish
with Limon and Barberries, so serve it to the Table very hot:

Thus you may do Haddocks or Whitings, or any other fresh Fish you like
best.


121. _To make Olives of Veal._

Take thin slices of a Leg of Veal, and have ready some Suet finely
shred, some Currans, beaten Spice, sweet herbs, and hard yolks of Eggs,
and a little salt mixed well together, then strew it upon the insides of
your slices of Meat, and roul them up hard, and make them fast with a
scure, so spit them and roste them, baste them with Butter, and serve
them in with Vinegar, Butter and Sugar.


122. _To make an Olive Pie._

Having your Paste in readiness with Butter in the bottom, lay in some of
the forenamed Olives, but not fastned with a Scure, then put in Currans,
hard Eggs, and sweet Butter, with some herbs shred fine; be sure you
cover it well with Butter, and put in a little white Wine and Sugar, and
close it, and bake it, eat it hot or cold, but hot is better.


123. _To make a Ball to take Stains out of Linnen, which many times
happens by Cooking or Preserving._

Take four Ounces of hard white Sope, beat it in a Mortar, with two small
Limons sliced, and as much Roch Allom as a Hazle Nut, when they are
beaten well together, make it up in little Balls, rub the stain
therewith and then wash it in warm water, till you see it be quite out.


124. _To make a fine Pomander._

Take two Ounces of Laudanum, of Benjamin and Storax one Ounce, Musk six
gr. as much of Civet, as much of Ambergreece, of Calamus Aromaticus, and
Lignum Aloes, of each the weight of a Groat, beat all these in a hot
Mortar and with a hot Pestel, till it come to a perfect Paste, then take
a little Gum Dragon steeped in Rosewater, and rub your hand withal, and
make it up with speed, and dry them, but first make them into what
shapes you please, and print them.


125. _A very fine washing-Ball._

Take three Ounces of Orrice, half an Ounce of Cypress-wood, 2 Ounces of
Calamus Aromaticus, 1 ounce of Damask-Rose leaves, 2 Ounces of
Lavender-flowers, a quarter of an Ounce of Cloves, beat all these and
searce them fine, then take two pounds and an half of Castile Sope
dissolved in Rose water, and beat all these forenamed things with the
Sope in a Mortar, and when they are well incorporated, make it into
Balls, and keep them in a Box with Cotton as long as you please.


126. _To make French Broth called Kink._

Take a leg of Beef and set it over the fire with a good quantity of fair
water, when it boils, scum it, and what meat soever you have to dress
that day, either of Fowl or small meat, put it all into this Liquor and
parboil it, then take out those small meats, and put in some French
Barley, and some whole Spice, one Clove or two of Garlick, and a handful
of Leeks, and some Salt; when it is boiled enough, pour it from the
Barley, and in put a little Saffron; so serve it in; and garnish your
Dish with sliced Oranges or Limons, and put a little of the juice
therein.


127. _To make Broth of a Lambs Head._

Boil it with as much water as will cover it, with whole Spice, and a
little Salt, and a bundle of sweet herbs, then put in strained Oatmeal
and Cream, and some Currans, when you take it up, put in Sack and Sugar,
then lay the Head in a Dish, and put the Broth to it, and serve it in.


128. _To season a Chicken-Pie._

Having your Paste rolled thin, and laid into your baking-pan, lay in
some Butter, then lay in your Chickens quartered, and seasoned with
Pepper, Nutmeg and a little Salt, then put in Raisins, Currans, and
Dates, then lay Butter on the top, close it and bake it, then cut it up,
and put in Clouted Cream, Sack and Sugar.


129. _To make an Herb Pie._

Take Spinage, hard Lettice, and a few sweet herbs, pick them, wash them,
and shred them, and put them into your Pie with Butter, and Nutmeg and
Sugar, and a little Salt, to close it and bake it, then draw it and open
it, and put in Clouted Cream; Sack and Sugar, and stir it well together,
and serve it in.


130. _To roste Lobsters._

Take two fair Lobsters alive, wash them clean, and stop the holes as you
do to boil, then fasten them to a Spit, the insides together; make a
good fire, and strew Salt on them, and that will kill them quickly, bast
them with Water and Salt till they be very red, then have ready some
Oysters stewed and cut small; put them into a Dish with melted Butter
beaten thick with a little water, then take a few spoonfuls of the
Liquor of the stewed Oysters, and dissolve in it two Anchovies, then put
it to the melted Butter, then take up your Lobsters, and crack the
shells that they may be easie to open.


131. _To make a Pumpion Pie._

Take a Pumpion, pare it, and cut it in thin slices, dip it in beaten
Eggs and Herbs shred small, and fry it till it be enough, then lay it
into a Pie with Butter, Raisins, Currans, Sugar and Sack, and in the
bottom some sharp Apples; when it is baked, butter it and serve it in.


132. _To make an Artichoke Pudding._

Boil a quart of Cream with whole Spice, then put in half a pound of
sweet Almonds blanched, and beaten with Rosewater; when they have boiled
well, take it from the fire, and take out the Spice, when it is almost
cold, put in the yolks of ten Eggs, some Marrow and some bottoms of
Artichokes, then sweeten it with Sugar and put in a little Salt, then
butter a Dish, and bake it in it, serve it to the Table stuck full of
blanched Almonds, and fine Sugar strewed over it.


133. _To pickle Sprats like Anchovies._

Take a Peck of the biggest Sprats without their heads, and salt them a
little over night, then take a Pot or Barrel, and lay in it a Lay of Bay
salt, and then a lay of Sprats, and a few Bay leaves, then salt again;
thus do till you have filled the Vessel, put in a little Limon Pill also
among your Bay leaves, then cover the Vessel and pitch it, that no Air
get in, set it in a cool Cellar, and once in a week turn it upside down;
in three Months you may eat of them.


134. _To keep Artichokes all the Year._

Gather your Artichokes with long stalks, and then cut off the stalks
close to them, then boil some water, with good Pears and Apples sliced
thin, and the Pith of the great stalks, and a Quince or two quartered to
give it a relish; when these have boiled a while, put in your
Artichokes, and boil all together till they be tender, then take them up
and set them to cool, then boil your Liquor well and strain it, when
your Artichokes be cold, put them into your Barrel, and when the Liquor
is cold, pour it over them, so cover it close that no Air get in.


135. _To make Pasty of a Joll of Ling._

Make your Crust with fine Flower, Butter, cold Cream, and two yolks of
Eggs:

Roul it thin and lay it in your Bake-pan, then take part of a Joll of
Ling well boiled, and pull it all in Bits, then lay some Butter into
your Pasty and then the Ling, then some grated Nutmeg, sliced Ginger,
Cloves and Mace, Oysters, Muscles, Cockles, and Shrimps, the yolks of
raw Eggs, a few Comfits perfumed, Candied Orange Pill, Citron Pill, and
Limon Pill, with Eringo Roots:

Then put in white Wine, and good store of Butter, and put on a thick
lid, when it is baked, open it, and let out the steam.


136. _To make French Servels._

Take cold Gammon of Bacon, fat and lean together, cut it small as for
Sausages, season it with Pepper, Cloves and Mace, and a little Shelots,
knead it into a Paste with the yolks of Eggs, and fill some Bullocks
Guts with it, and boil them; but if you would have them to keep, then do
not put in Eggs.

When you have filled the Guts, boil them, and hang them up, and when you
would eat them, serve them in thin slices with a Sallad.


137. _To make a Pallat Pie._

Take Oxe Pallats and boil them so tender that you may run a straw
through them; to three Palates take six Sheeps tongues boiled tender and
peeled, three sweet-Breads of Veal, cut all these in thin slices, then
having your Pie ready, and Butter in the bottom, lay in these things,
first seasoned with Pepper, Salt and Nutmeg, and Thyme and Parsley shred
small, and as the Season of the year is, put into it Asparagus,
Anchovies, Chesnuts, or what you please else, as Candied Orange Pill,
Limon Pill, or Citron Pill, with Eringo roots, and yolks of hard Eggs,
some Marrow and some Oysters, then lay in good store of Butter on the
top, so close it and bake it, then put in white Wine, buter, the yolks
of Eggs, and Vinegar and Sugar; heat them together over the fire, and
serve it in.


138. _To make Sauce for Fowles or Mutton._

Take Claret Wine, Vinegar, Anchovies, Oisters, Nutmeg, Shelot, Gravie of
Mutton or Beef, sweet Butter, Juice of Limon, and a little Salt, and if
you please Orange or Limon Pill.


139. _To make Oat-Cakes._

Take fine Flower, and mix it very well with new Ale Yest, and make it
very stiff, then make it into little Cakes, and roul them very thin,
then lay them on an Iron to bake, or on a baking stone, and make but a
slow fire under it, and as they are baking, take them and turn the edges
of them round on the Iron, that they may bake also, one quarter of an
hour will bake them; a little before you take them up, turn them on the
other side, only to flat them; for if you turn them too soon, it will
hinder the rising, the Iron or Stone whereon they are baked, must stand
at a distance from the fire.


140. _To make a rare Lamb Pie._

Take a Leg of Lamb, and take the meat clean out of it at the great end,
but keep the skin whole, then press the Meat in a Cloth, and mince it
small, and put as much Beef Suet to it as the Meat in weight, and mince
it small, then put to it Naples Bisket grated fine, season it with
beaten Spice, Rosewater, and a little Salt, then put in some Candied
Limon Pill, Orange Pill, and Citron Pill shred small, and some Sugar,
then put part of the Meat into the skin, then having your Pie in
readiness, and Butter in the bottom, lay in this Meat, then take the
rest of your Meat, and make it into Balls or Puddings with yolks of
Eggs, then lay them into the Pie to fill up the Corners, then take
Candied Orange, Limon and Citron Pill, cut in long narrow slices and
strew over it; you may put in Currans and Dates if you please, then lay
on Butter, and close up your Pie and bake it, and leave a Tunnel, when
it is baked, put in Sack, Sugar, yolks of Eggs and Butter heat together,
if you put in Marrow, it will be the better.


141. _To fry Garden Beans._

Boil them and blanch them, and fry them in Sweet Butter, with Parsley
and shred Onions and a little Salt, then melt Butter for the Sauce.


142. _To make a Sorrel Sallad._

Take a quantity of French Sorrel picked clean and washed, boil it with
water and a little Salt, and when it is enough, drain it and butter it,
and put in a little Vinegar and Sugar into it, then garnish it with hard
Eggs and Raisins.


143. _To make good cold Sallads of several things._

Take either Coleflowers, or Carrots, or Parsneps, or Turneps after they
are well boiled, and serve them in with Oil, Vinegar and Pepper, also
the Roots of red Beets boiled tender are very good in the same manner.


144. _To make the best sort of Pippin Paste._

Take a pound of raw Pippins sliced and beaten in a Mortar, then take a
pound of fine Sugar and boil it to a candy height with a little fair
water, then put in your Pippins, and boil it till it will come from the
bottom of the Posnet, but stir it for fear it burn.


145. _To make Sauce for a Leg of Veal rosted._

Take boiled Currans, and boiled Parsley, and hard Eggs and Butter and
Sugar hot together.


146. _To make Sauce for a Leg of Mutton rosted with Chesnuts._

Take a good quantity of Chesnuts, and boil them tender, then take the
shells off, and bruise them small, then put to them Claret Wine, Butter
and a little Salt, so put it into the Dish to the Meat, and serve it in.


147. _To keep Quinces white, either to preserve whole, or for white
Marmalade or Paste._

Coddle them with white Wine and Water, and cover them with sliced
Pippins in the Codling.


148. _To make little Pasties with sweet Meats to fry._

Make some Paste with cold water, butter and flower, with the yolk of an
Egg, then roul it out in little thin Cakes, and lay one spoonful of any
kind of Sweet meats you like best upon every one, so close them up and
fry them with Butter, and serve them in with fine Sugar strewed on.


149. _To boil a Capon on the French fashion._

Boil your Capon in water and salt, and a little dusty Oatmeal to make it
look white, then take two or three Ladles full of Mutton Broth, a Faggot
of sweet herbs, two or three Dates cut in long pieces, a few parboiled
Currans, and a little whole Pepper, a little Mace and Nutmeg, thicken
it with Almonds; season it with Verjuice, Sugar, and a little sweet
Butter, then take up your Capon and lard it well with preserved Limon,
then lay it in a deep Dish, and pour the broth upon it; then Garnish
your Dish with Suckets and preserved Barberries.


150. _To Souce a Pike, Carp or Bream._

Draw your Fish, but scale it not, and save the Liver of it; wash it very
well, then take white Wine, as much water again as Wine, boil them
together with whole Spice, Salt and a bundle of sweet Herbs, and when
boiles put in your Fish, and just before it a little Vinegar; for that
will make it crisp: when it is enough, take it up and put it into a
Trey, then put into the Liquor some whole Pepper, and whole Ginger, and
when it is boiled enough, take it off and cool it, and when it is quite
cold, put in your Fish, and when you serve it in, lay some of the Jelly
about the Dish sides, and some Fennel and Sawcers of Vinegar.


151. _To boil a Gurnet on the French fashion._

Draw your Gurnet and wash it, boil it in water and salt and a bundle of
sweet herbs; when it is enough, take it up and put it into a Dish with
Sippets over a Chafingdish of Coals; then take Verjuice, Butter, Nutmeg
and Pepper, and the yolks of two Eggs, heat it together, and pour over
it; Garnish your Dish as you please.


152. _To rost a Leg of Mutton on the French fashion._

Take a Leg of Mutton, and pare off all the Skin as thin as you can, then
lard it with sweet Lard, and stick it with Cloves, when it is half
rosted, cut off three or four thin pieces, and mince it with sweet
herbs, and a little beaten Ginger, put in a Ladle full of Claret wine,
and a little sweet butter, two sponfuls of Verjuice and a little Pepper,
a few Capers, then chop the yolks of two hard Eggs in it, then when
these have stewed a while in a Dish, put your bonie part which is rosted
into a Dish, and pour this on it and serve it in.


153. _To rost a Neats tongue._

Chop sweet herbs fine with a piece of raw Apple, season it with Pepper
and Ginger, and the yolk of an Egg made hard and minced small, then
stuff your Tongue with this, and rost it well, and baste it with Butter
and Wine; when it is enough, take Verjuice, Butter, and the Juice of a
Limon, and a little Nutmeg, then Dish your Tongue and pour this Sauce
over it and serve it in.


154. _To boil Pigeons with Rice._

Take your Pigeons and truss them, and stuff their bellies with sweet
herbs, then put them into a Pipkin with as much Mutton broth as will
cover them, with a blade of Mace and some whole Pepper; boil all these
together until the Pigeons be tender, and put in Salt:

Then take them from the fire, and scum off the Fat very clean, then put
in a piece of sweet Butter, season it with Verjuice, Nutmeg and a little
Sugar, thicken it with Rice boiled in sweet Cream. Garnish your Dish
with preserved Barberries and Skirret Roots boiled tender.


155. _To boil a Rabbit._

Take a large Rabbit, truss it and boil it with a little Mutton Broth,
white Wine and a blade of Mace, then take Lettuce, Spinage, and Parsley,
Winter-Savory and sweet Marjoram, pick all these and wash them clean,
and bruise them a little to make the Broth look green, thicken it with
the Crust of a Manchet first steeped in a little Broth, and put in a
little sweet Butter, season it with Verjuice and Pepper, and serve it to
the Table upon Sippets; Garnish the Dish with Barberries.


156. _To boil a Teal or Wigeon._

Parboil either of these Fowls and throw them into a pail of fair Water,
for that taketh away the Rankness, then rost them half, and take them
from the fire, and put sweet herbs in the bellies of them, and stick the
Brests with Cloaves, then put them in a Pipkin with two or three ladles
full of Mutton broth, very strong of the Meat, a blade of whole Mace,
two or three little Onions minced small; thicken it with a Toast of
Houshold bread, and put in a little Butter, then put in a little
Verjuice, so take it up and serve it.


157. _To boil Chickens or Pigeons with Goosberries or Grapes._

Boil them with Mutton Broth and white Wine, with a blade of Mace and a
little Salt, and let their bellies be filled with sweet herbs, when they
are tender thicken the Broth with a piece of Manchet, and the yolks of
two hard Eggs, strained with some of the Broth, and put it into a deep
Dish with some Verjuice and Butter and Sugar, then having Goosberries or
Grapes tenderly scalded, put them into it, then lay your Chickens or
Pigeons into a Dish, and pour the Sauce over them, and serve them in.


158. _A made Dish of Rabbits Livers._

Take six Livers and chop them fine with sweet herbs and the yolks of two
hard Eggs, season it with beaten Spice, and Salt, and put in some
plumped Currans, and a little melted Butter, so mix them very well
together, and having some Paste ready rouled thin, make it into little
Pasties and fry them, strew Sugar over them and serve them.


159. _To make a Florentine with the Brawn of a Capon, or the Kidney of
Veal._

Mince any of these with sweet Herbs, then put in parboiled Currans, and
Dates minced small, and a little Orange or Limon Pill which is Candied
shred small, season it with beaten Spice and Sugar, then take the yolks
of two hard Eggs and bruise them with a little Cream, a piece of a short
Cake grated, and Marrow cut in short pieces, mix all these together with
the forenamed Meat, and put in a little Salt and a little Rosewater, and
bake it in a Dish in a Puff-Past, and when you serve it strew Sugar over
it.


160. _A Friday Pie without Fish or Flesh._

Wash a good quantity of green Beets, and pluck out the middle string,
then chop them small, with two or three ripe Apples well relished,
season it with Pepper, Salt, and Ginger, then add to it some Currans,
and having your Pie ready, and Butter in the bottom, put in these herbs,
and with them a little Sugar, then put Butter on the top, and close and
bake it, then cut it up, and put in the juice of a Limon and Sugar.


161. _To make Umble Pies._

Boil them very tender, and mince them very small with Beef Suet and
Marrow then season it with beaten Spice and Salt, Rosewater and Sugar
and a little Sack, so put it into your Paste with Currans and Dates.


162. _To bake Chickens with Grapes._

Scald your Chickens and truss them, and season them with Pepper, Salt
and Nutmeg, and having your Pie ready, and Butter laid in the bottom,
put in your Chickens, and then more butter, and bake them with a thin
Lid on your Pie, and when it is baked, put in Grapes scalded tender,
Verjuice, Nutmeg, Butter and Sugar, and the Juice of an Orange; so serve
it in.


163. _To make a good Quince-Pie._

Take your fairest Quinces and Coddle them until a straw will run through
them, then core them and pare them, then take their weight in fine
Sugar, and stuff them full of Sugar, then having your Pie ready, lay in
your Quinces, and strew the rest of your Sugar over them, and put in
some whole Cloves and Cinamon, then close it, and bake it; you must let
it stand in the Oven four or five hours; serve it in cold and strew on
Sugar.


164. _To make Tarts of Pippins._

Having some Puff-Past ready in a Dish or Pan, lay in some preserved
Pippins which have Orange Pill in them, and the Juice of Orange or
Limon, so close them and bake them a little.


165. _To make a good pie of Beef._

Take the Buttock of a fat Oxe, slice it thin, mince it small and beat it
in a Mortar to a Paste, then lard it very well with Lard, and season it
with beaten Spice, then make your Pie, and put it in with some Butter
and Claret Wine, and so bake it well, and serve it in cold with Mustard
and Sugar, and garnish it with Bay-leaves.


166. _To bake a Swan._

Scald it and take out the bones, and parboil it, then season it very
well with Pepper, Salt and Ginger, then lard it, and put it in a deep
Coffin of Rye Paste with store of Butter, close it and bake it very
well, and when it is baked, fill up the Vent-hole with melted Butter,
and so keep it; serve it in as you do the Beef-Pie.


167. _To bake a Turkey or Capon._

Bone the Turkey but not the Capon, parboil them, and stick Cloves on
their brests, lard them and season them well with Pepper and Salt, and
put them in a deep Coffin with good store of Butter, and close your Pie,
and bake it, and soak it very well; when it is baked, fill it up with
melted Butter, and when it is quite cold, serve it in and eat it with
Mustard and Sugar: garnish it with Bay Leaves.


168. _To make Fritters._

Take the Curds of a Sack Posset, the Yolks of six Eggs, and the Whites
of two, with a little fine Flower to make it into a thick Batter, put in
also a Pomewater cut in small pieces, some beaten Spice, warm Cream, and
a spoonful of Sack, and a little strong Ale; mingle all these very well,
and beat them well, and fry them in very hot Lard, and serve them in
with beaten Spice and fine Sugar.


169. _To bake Woodcocks, Black-birds Sparrows or Larks._

Truss and parboil them, then season them with Pepper and Salt, and put
them into a Pie with good store of Butter, and so bake them, then fill
them up with Butter.


170. _To bake a Goose._

Bone your Goose and parboil it, and season it with Pepper and Salt, and
lay it into a deep Coffin with good store of Butter top and bottom, then
bake it very well, and when it is baked, fill up the pie at the
Vent-hole with melted Butter, and so serve it in with Mustard and Sugar
and Bay-Leaves.


171. _To make Pancakes so crisp as you may set them upright._

Make a dozen or a score of them in a little Frying-pan, no bigger than a
Sawcer, then boil them in Lard, and they will look as yellow as Gold,
and eat very well.


172. _To make blanched Manchet._

Take six Eggs, half a Pint of sweet cream, and a penny Manchet grated,
one Nutmeg grated, two spoonfuls of Rosewater, and two Ounces of Sugar,
work it stiff like a Pudding, then fry it in a very little frying-pan,
that it may be thick.

Fry it brown, and turn it upon a Pie-Plate; cut it in quarters and strew
Sugar on it and serve it in.


173. _To make a sierced Pudding._

Mince a Leg of Mutton with sweet herbs, and some Suet, make it very
fine, then put in grated Bread, minced Dates, Currans, Raisins of the
Sun stoned, a little preserved Orange or Limon, and a few Coriander
seeds bruised, Nutmeg, Ginger, and Pepper, mingle all together with
Cream and raw Eggs wrought together like a Paste, and bake it, and put
for Sauce the yolk of an Egg, Rosewater, Sugar and Cinamon, with a
little Butter heat together, when you serve it in, stick it with Almonds
and Rosemary; you may boil it also if you please, or rost some of in a
Lambs Cawl.


174. _To make a Fricasie of Eggs._

Beat twelve Eggs with Cream, Sugar, beaten spice and Rosewater, then
take thin slices of Pomewater Apple, and fry them well with sweet
Butter; when they are enough, take them up, and cleanse your pan, then
put in more butter and make it hot, and put in half your Eggs and fry
them; then when the one side is fryed lay your Apples all over the side
which is not fryed, then pour in the rest of your Eggs, and then turn it
and fry the other side, then serve it in with the Juice of an Orange and
Butter, and Sugar.


175. _To make a_ Cambridge_-Pudding._

Take grated bread searced through a Cullender, then mix it with fine
Flower, minced Dates, Currans, beaten Spice, Suet shred small, a little
salt, sugar and rosewater, warm Cream and Eggs, with half their Whites;
mould all these together with a little Yest, and make it up into a Loaf,
but when you have made it in two parts, ready to clap together, make a
deep hole in the one, and put in butter, then clap on the other, and
close it well together, then butter a Cloth and tie it up hard, and put
it into water which boiles apace, then serve it in with Sack, Butter and
Sugar.

You may bake it if you please in a baking-pan.


176. _To make a Pudding of Goose Blood._

Save the blood of a Goose, and strain it, then put in fine Oatmeal
steeped in warm Milk, Nutmeg, Pepper, sweet Herbs, Sugar, Salt, Suet
minced fine, Rosewater, Limon Pill, Coriander seeds, then put in some
Eggs, and beat all these together very well, then boil them how you do
like, either in a buttered Cloth or in Skins, or rost it within the Neck
of the Goose.


177. _To make Liver Puddings._

Take a Hogs Liver boiled and cold, grate it like Bread, then take new
Milk and the Fat of a Hog minced fine, put it to the Bread and the
Liver, and divide it into two parts, then dry herbs or other if you can
minced fine, and put the Herbs into one part with beaten Spice,
Anniseeds, Rosewater, Cream and Eggs, Sugar and Salt, so fill the Skins
and boil them.

To the other part put preserved Barberries, diced Dates, Currans, beaten
Spice, Salt, Sugar, Rosewater, Cream and Eggs, so mix them well
together, and fill the Skins and boil them.


178. _To make a Chiveridge Pudding._

Take the fattest Guts of your Hog clean scoured, then fluff them with
beaten Spice and sliced Dates, sweet herbs, a little Salt, Rosewater,
Sugar, and two or three Eggs to make it slide; so fill them, tie them up
like Puddings and boil them; when they are enough serve them.


179. _To make Rice Puddings in Skins._

Take two quarts of Milk and put therein as it is yet cold, two good
handfuls of Rice clean picked and washed, set it over a slow fire and
stir it often, but gently; when you perceive it to swell, let it boil
apace till it be tender and very thick, then take it from the fire, and
when it is cold, put in six Eggs well beaten, some Rosewater and Sugar,
beaten Spice and a little Salt, preserved Barberries and Dates minced
small, some Marrow and Citron Pill; mingle them well together and fill
your Skins, and boil them.


180. _To make a stewed Pudding._

Take the yolks of three Eggs and one White, six spoonfuls of sweet
Cream, a little beaten spice, and a quarter of a pound of Sewet minced
fine, a quarter of a pound of Currans, and a little grated bread,
Rosewater, Sugar and Salt; mingle them well together, and wrap them up
in little pieces of the Cawl of Veal, and fasten them with a little
stick, and tie each end with a stick, you may put four in one dish, then
take half a pint of strong Mutton Broth, and 6 spoonfuls of Vinegar,
three or four blades of large Mace, and one Ounce of Sugar, make this to
boil over a Chafingdish of Coals, then put in your Puddings, and when
they boil, cover them with another Dish, but turn them sometimes, and
when you see that they are enough, take your Puddings and lay them in a
warm Dish upon Sippets, then add to their Broth some Sack, Sugar, and
Butter, and pour over them; garnish your Dish with Limon and Barberries.


181. _To make a_ Sussex _Pudding._

Take a little cold Cream, Butter and Flower, with some beaten Spice,
Eggs, and a little Salt, make them into a stiff Paste, then make it up
in a round Ball, and as you mold it, put in a great piece of Butter in
the middle; and so tye it hard up in a buttered Cloth, and put it into
boiling water, and let it boil apace till it be enough, then serve it
in, and garnish your dish with Barberries; when it is at the Table cut
it open at the top, and there will be as it were a Pound of Butter, then
put Rosewater and Sugar into it, and so eat it.

In some of this like Paste you may wrap great Apples, being pared
whole, in one piece of thin Paste, and so close it round the Apple, and
throw them into boiling water, and let them boil till they are enough,
you may also put some green Goosberries into some, and when either of
these are boiled, cut them open and put in Rosewater Butter and Sugar.


182. _To make_ French _Puffs._

Take Spinage Parsley and Endive, with a little Winter savory, and wash
them, and mince them very fine; season them with Nutmeg, Ginger and
Sugar, season them with Eggs, and put in a little Salt, then cut a Limon
into thin round slices, and upon every slice of Limon lay one spoonful
of it.

Then fry them, and serve them in upon some Sippets, and pour over them
Sack, Sugar and butter.


183. _To make Apple Puffs._

Take a Pomewater, or any other Apple that is not hard or harsh in taste,
mince it with a few Raisins of the Sun stoned, then wet them with Eggs,
and beat them together with the back of a Spoon, season them with
Nutmeg, Rosewater, Sugar, and Ginger, drop them into a frying pan with a
Spoon into hot Butter, and fry them, then serve them in with the juice
of an Orange and a little Sugar and Butter.


184. _To make Kickshaws, to bake or fry in what shape you please._

Take some Puff-paste and roul it thin, if you have Moulds work it upon
them with preserved Pippins, and so close them, and fry or bake them,
but when you have closed them you must dip them in the yolks of Eggs,
and that will keep all in; fill some with Goosberries, Rasberries, Curd,
Marrow, Sweet-breads, Lambs Stones, Kidney of Veal, or any other thing
what you like best, either of them being seasoned before you put them in
according to your mind, and when they are baked or fryed, strew Sugar on
them, and serve them in.


185. _To make an_ Italian _Pudding._

Take a penny white loaf and pare off the crust, then cut it like Dice,
then take some Beef Suet shred small, and half a pound of Raisins of the
Sun stoned, with as many Currans, mingle them together and season them
with beaten Spice and a little Salt, wet them with four Eggs, and stir
them gently for fear of breaking the Bread, then put it in a dish with a
little Cream and Rosewater and Sugar, then put in some Marrow and Dates,
and so butter a dish and bake it, then strew on Sugar and serve it.


186. _To hash Calves Tongues._

Boil them tender and pill them, then lard them with Limon Pill, and lard
them also with fat Bacon, then lay them to the Fire and half rost them;
then put them in a Pipkin with Claret Wine, whole Spice and sliced
Limon, and a few Caraway Seeds, a little Rosemary and a little Salt,
boil all together and serve them in upon Toasts. Thus you may do with
Sheeps Tongues also.


187. _To boil a Capon._

Take strong Mutton Broth, and truss a Capon, and boil him in it with
some Marrow and a little Salt in a Pipkin, when it is tender, then put
in a pint of White Wine, half a pound of Sugar, and four Ounces of Dates
stoned and sliced, Potato Roots boiled and blanched, large Mace and
Nutmeg sliced, boil all these together with a quarter of a pint of
Verjuyce, then dish the Capon, and add to the Broth the yolks of six
Eggs beaten with Sack, and so serve it; garnish dish with several sorts
of Candied Pills and Preserved Barberries, and sliced Limon with Sugar
upon every slice.


188. _To boil a Capon with Rice._

Truss your Capon and boil him in water and salt, then take a quarter of
a pound of Rice, first boiled in Milk, and put in with some whole Spice
and a little Salt, when it is almost enough put in a little Rosewater,
and half a pound of Almonds blanched and beaten, strain them in, and put
in some Cream and Sugar, then when your Capon is enough, lay it in a
dish, and pour the Broth thereon; garnish your Dish as you please, and
serve it in.


189. _To boil a Capon with Pippins._

Parboil your capon after it is trussed, then put it into a pipkin with
Mutton Broth and Marrow, and a little Salt, with a quart of White-Wine,
a little Nutmeg and Dates stoned and sliced, then put in a quarter of a
pound of fine Sugar, then take some Pippins stewed with Sugar, Spice and
a little water, and put them in, then lay your Capon into a Dish, and
lay some Naples Biskets for Sippets, then bruise the yolks of eight hard
Eggs and put into your Broth, with a little Sack, and pour it over your
Capon; Garnish your Dish and serve it in.


190. _To boil Chickens with Lettuce the very best way._

Parboil your Chickens and cut them in Quarters, and put them into a
Pipkin with some Mutton Broth, and two or three sweet Breads of Veal,
and some Marrow, and some Cloves, and a little Salt, and a little Limon
Pill; then take good store of hard Lettuce, cut them in halves and wash
them, and put them in; then put in Butter and Sack and white Wine, with
a little Mace and Nutmeg, and sliced Dates, let all these stew upon the
Fire, and when they be enough, serve them in with Toasts of white Bread
for Sippets; Garnish the Dish with Limon and Barberies, and what else
you please; thus you may do Pigeons.


190. [Transcriber's Note: so numbered in original] _To boil a Rabbit
with Grapes or with Goosberries._

Truss your Rabbit whole, and boil it in some Mutton Broth till it be
tender;

Then take a pint of White Wine, and a good handful of Spinage chopped,
the yolks of hard Eggs cut in quarters, put these to the Rabbit with
some large Mace; a Fagot of sweet Herbs and a little Salt and some
Butter, let them boil together a while, then take your Rabbet and lay it
in a Dish and some Sippets, then lay over it some Grapes or Goosberries,
scalded with Sugar, and pour your Broth over it.


191. _To boil a Rabbit with Claret Wine._

Boil a Rabbet as before, then slice Onions and a Carrot root, a few
Currans and a Fagot of sweet herbs, and a little Salt, minced Parsley,
Barberries picked, large Mace, Nutmeg and Ginger, put all these into a
Pipkin with the Rabbet, half a Pound of Butter, and a Pint of Claret
Wine, and let them boil together till it be enough, then serve it upon
Sippets.


192. _To boil a wild Duck._

Truss and parboil it, then half rost it, then carve it, and save the
Gravie, then take Onions and Parsley sliced, Ginger and Pepper, put the
Gravie into a Pipkin, with Currans, Mace, Barberries, and a quart of
Claret Wine, and a little Salt, put your Duck with all the forenamed
things into it, and let them boil till it be enough, then put in butter
and sugar, and serve it in upon Sippets.


193. _To boil a tame Duck._

Take your Duck and truss it, and boil it with water and salt, or rather
Mutton broth, when it hath boiled a while, put in some whole Spice, and
when it is boiled enough, take some white wine and butter, and good
store of Onions boiled tender in several waters, with a little of the
Liquor wherein the Duck hath boiled, and a little Salt: put your Duck
into a Dish, and heat these things together and pour over it; and serve
it; garnish the Dish with boiled Onions and Barberries.


194. _To boil Pigeons with Capers and Samphire._

Truss your Pigeons, and put them into a Pipkin with some Mutton broth
and white Wine, a bundle of sweet herbs, when they are boiled, lay them
into a Dish, then take some of the broth with some Capers and Limon
sliced, and some butter, heat these together and pour over them; then
fry thin slices of Bacon, and lay upon them, and some Samphire washed
from the Salt, and some slices of Limon; Garnish your Dish with the same
and serve it in.


195. _To boil Sausages._

Take two pounds of Sausages, and boil them with a quart of Claret Wine
and a bundle of sweet herbs, and whole Cloves and Mace; then put in a
little Butter, when they are enough, serve them in with this Liquor and
some Mustard in Sawcers.


196. _To boil Goose Giblets._

Boil them with water and salt, and a bundle of sweet herbs, Onions and
whole spice, when they are enough, put in Verjuice and Butter, and some
Currans plumped, and serve them upon Sippets.

Thus you may dress Swans Giblets.


197. _To boil Giblets with Roots and good Herbs._

Boil them in a quart of Claret, Ginger and Cloves, and a Faggot of sweet
herbs, Turneps and Carots sliced, with good store of Spinage and a
little salt; when they are enough, serve them upon Sippets.

And add to the Broth some Verjuice and the yolks of Eggs; Garnish your
Dish with Parsley and pickled Barberries.


198. _To smoor a Neck of Mutton._

Cut your Steaks, and put them into a Dish with some Butter, then take a
Faggot of sweet herbs and some gross Pepper and a little Salt, and put
them to them; cover your Dish, and let them stew till they are enough,
turning them sometimes, then put in a little Claret Wine and Anchovies,
and serve them upon Sippets.


199. _To smoor Veal._

Cut thin slices of Veal and hack them over with the back of a Knife,
then lard them with Lard, and Fry them with strong Beer or Ale till they
be enough, then stew them in Claret wine with some whole Spice and
Butter and a little salt.

Garnish your Dish with Sausages fryed; and with Barberries, to serve
them in.


200. _To smoor Steaks of Mutton another way._

Cut part of a Leg of Mutton into steaks, and fry it in White Wine and a
little salt, a bundle of herbs, and a little Limon Pill, then put it
into a Pipkin with some sliced Limon, without the Rind, and some of the
Liquor it was fried in, and Butter and a little Parslie, boil all
together till you see it be enough, then serve it in, and garnish your
Dish with Limon and Barberries.


201. _To smoor Chickens._

Cut them in Joints and fry them with sweet Butter, then take white Wine,
Parsley and Onions chopp'd small, whole Mace and a little gross Pepper,
a little Sugar, Verjuice and Butter, let these and your fried Chicken
boil together, then fry the Leaves of Clary with Eggs, put in a little
Salt to your Chickens, and when they are enough, serve them in this
fried Clary, and garnish your Dish with Barberries.


202. _To fry Museles, or Oysters, or Cockles to serve in with Meat, or
by themselves._

Take any of these and parboil them in their own Liquor, then dry them,
flower them, and fry them, then put them into a Pipkin with Claret wine,
whole Spice and Anchovies, and a little butter, so let them stew
together, and serve them in either with a Duck, or by themselves, as you
like best.


204. [Transcriber's note: so numbered in original] _To dress Calves
feet._

Take Calves feet tenderly boiled, and slit them in the middle, then put
them in a Dish with sweet Butter, Parsley and Onions chopped a little
Thyme, large Mace, Pepper with a little Wine Vinegar, and a little salt,
let all these stew together till they are enough, then lay your Calves
feet in a Dish, and pour the Sauce over them, then strew some raw
Parsley and hard Eggs chopped together over them with slices of Limon
and Barberries.


205. _To hash Neats tongues._

Boil them and blanch them, and slice them thin then take Raisins of the
Sun, large Mace, Dates sliced thin, a few blanched Almonds and Claret
wine with a little salt; boil all these together with some sweet butter,
verjuice and sugar; when they are enough, serve them in and thicken the
Sauce with yolks of Eggs; garnish your Dish with Barberries.


206. _Another way to hash Neats Tongues._

Boil Neats Tongues very tender, peel them and slice them thin, then take
strong meat broth, blanched Chesnuts, a Faggot of sweet herbs, large
Mace, and Endive, a little Pepper and whole Cloves and a little Salt;
boil all these together with some butter till they be enough; garnish
your Dish as before.


207. _To boil Chickens in white-broth._

Take three Chickens and truss them, then take two or three blades of
Mace, as many quartered Dates, four or five Lumps of Marrow, a little
Salt and a little Sugar, the yolks of three hard Eggs, and a quarter of
a Pint of Sack, first boil your Chickins in Mutton broth, and then add
these things to them, and let them boil till they are enough, then lay
your Chickens in a Dish, and strain some Almonds blanched and beaten
into it, serve it upon Sippets of French Bread; garnish your Dish with
hard Eggs and Limons.


208. _To boil Partridges._

Put two or three Partridges into a Pipkin with as much water as will
cover them, then put in three or four blades of Mace, one Nutmeg
quartered, five or six Cloves, a piece of sweet Butter, two or three
Toasts of Manchet toasted brown, soke them in Sack or Muskadine, and
break them, and put them into the Pipkin with the rest, and a little
Salt, when they are enough, lay them in a Dish, and pour this Broth over
them, then garnish your Dish with hard Eggs and sliced Limon, and serve
it in.


209. _To boil a Leg of Mutton._

Take a large Leg of Mutton and stuff it well with Mutton Suet, Salt and
Nutmeg, boil it in water and Salt, but not too much, then put some of
that broth into another Pot, with three or four blades of Mace, some
Currans and Salt, boil them till half be consumed, then put in some
sweet Butter, and some Capers and a Limon cut like Dice with the Rind
on, a little Sack, and the yolks of two hard Eggs minced; then lay your
Mutton into a Dish upon Sippets, and pour this Sauce over it; scrape
Sugar on the sides of your Dish, and lay on slices of Limon and
Barberries.


210. _To stew Trouts._

Put two Trouts into a fair dish with some white Wine, sweet butter, and
a little whole Mace, a little Parsley, Thyme and Savory minced, then put
in an Anchovy and the yolks of hard Eggs; when your Fish is enough,
serve it on Sippets, and pour this over it, and garnish your Dish with
Limon and Barberries, and serve them in: you may add Capers to it if you
please, and you may do other Fish in this manner.


211. _To boil Eels in Broth to serve with them._

Flay and wash your Eels and cut them in pieces about a handful long,
then put them into a pot with so much Water as will cover them, a little
Pepper and Mace, sliced Onions, a little grated bread, and a little
Yest, a good piece of sweet butter, some Parsley, Winter Savory and
Thyme shred small; let them boil softly half an hour, and put in some
Salt, with some Currans; when it is enough, put in Verjuice and more
Butter, and so serve it; Garnish your Dish with Parsley, Limon and
Barberries, put Sippets in your Dish.


212. _To boil a Pike with Oysters._

Take a fair Pike and gut it and wash it, and truss it round with the
tail in the mouth, then take white Wine, Water and Salt, with a bundle
of sweet herbs, and whole Spice, a little Horse-radish; when it boils,
tie up your Pike in a Cloth, and put it in, and let it boil till it
swims, for then it is enough; then take the Rivet of the Pike, and a
Pint of great Oysters with their Liquor, and some Vinegar, large Mace,
gross Pepper, then lay your Pike in a Dish with Sippets, and then heat
these just named things with some Butter and Anchovies, and pour over
it; garnish your Dish as you please.


213. _To make a grand Sallad._

Take a fair broad brimm'd dish, and in the middle of it lay some pickled
Limon Pill, then lay round about it each sort by themselves, Olives,
Capers, Broom Buds, Ash Keys, Purslane pickled, and French Beans
pickled, and little Cucumbers pickled, and Barberries pickled, and
Clove Gilliflowers, Cowslips, Currans, Figs, blanched Almonds and
Raisins, Slices of Limon with Sugar on them, Dates stoned and sliced.

Garnish your Dish brims with Candied Orange, Limon and Citron Pill, and
some Candied Eringo roots.


214. _To rost Pig with a Pudding in his Belly._

Take a fat Pig and truss his head backward loking over his back, then
make such Pudding as you like best, and fill his belly with it, your
Pudding must be stiff, then sew it up, and rost your Pig, when it is
almost enough, wring upon it the Juice of a Limon, and when you are
ready to take it up, wash it over with yolks of Eggs, and before they
can dry, dredge it with grated bread mixed with a little Nutmeg and
Ginger, let your Sauce be Vinegar, Butter and Sugar, and the yolks of
hard Eggs minced.


215. _To rost a Leg of Mutton with Oisters._

Take a large Leg of Mutton and stuff it well with Mutton Sewet, with
Pepper, Nutmeg Salt and Mace, then rost it and stick it with Cloves,
when it is half rosted cut off some of the under side of the fleshy end,
in little thin Bits, then take a Pint of Oisters and the Liquor of them,
a little Mace, sweet Butter and Salt, put all these with the Bits of
Mutton into a Pipkin till half be consumed; then Dish your Mutton and
pour this Sauce over it, strew Salt about the Dish side and serve it in.


216. _To make a Steak-Pie._

Cut a Neck of Mutton in steaks, then season it with Pepper and Salt, lay
your Paste into your Baking Pan, and lay Butter in the bottom, then lay
in your steaks, and a little large Mace, and cover it with Butter, so
close it, and bake it; and against it is baked, have in readiness good
store of boiled Parslie minced fine, and drained from the water, some
white Wine and some Vinegar, sweet Butter and Sugar, cut open your Pie,
and put in this Sauce, and shake it well, and serve it to the Table; it
is not so good cold as hot.


217. _To rost a Haunch or a Shoulder of Venison, or a Chine of Mutton._

Take either of these, and lard it with Lard, and stick it thick with
Rosemary, then roft it with a quick fire, but do not lay it too near;
baste it with sweet butter: then take half a Pint of Claret wine, a
little beaten Cinamon and Ginger, and as much sugar as will sweeten it,
five or six whole Cloves, a little grated bread, and when it is boiled
enough, put in a little Sweet butter, a little Vinegar, and a very
little Salt, when your meat is rosted, serve it in with Sauce, and strew
salt about your Dish.


218. _To rost a Capon with Oysters and Chesnuts._

Take some boiled Chesnuts, and take off their shells, and take as many
parboil'd Oysters, then spit your Capon, and put these into the belly of
it, with some sweet Butter, rost it and bast it with sweet Butter, save
the Gravie, and some of the Chesnuts, and some of the Oysters, then add
to them half a Pint of Claret Wine, and a pice of sweet Butter and a
little Pepper, and a little Salt, stew these altogether till the Capon
be ready, then serve them in with it; Garnish your Dish as you please.


219. _To rost Shoulder or Fillet of Veal with farcing herbs._

Wash your meat and parboil it a little, then take Parsley,
Winter-savory, and Thyme, of each a little minced small, put to them the
yolks of three or four hard eggs minced, Nutmeg, Pepper and Currans and
Salt, add also some Suet minced small; work all these with the yolk of a
raw Egg, and stuff your Meat with it, but save some, and set it under
the meat while it doth rost, when your meat is almost rosted enough, put
to these in the Dish, a quarter of a pint of White Wine Vinegar, and
some Sugar, when your meat is ready, serve it in with this Sauce, and
strew on Salt.


220. _To make boiled Sallads._

Boil some Carots very tender, and scrape them to pieces like the Pulp of
an Apple, season them with Cinamon and Ginger and Sugar, put in Currans,
a little Vinegar, and a piece of sweet Butter, stew these in a Dish, and
when they begin to dry put in more Butter and a little Salt, so serve
them to the Table, thus you may do Lettuce, or Spinage or Beets.


221. _To boil a Shoulder of Veal._

Take a Shoulder of Veal and half boil it in Water and Salt, then slice
off the most part of it, and save the Gravie; then take that sliced
meat, and put it in a Pot with some of the Broth that boiled it, a
little grated Bread, Oister Liquor, Vinegar, Bacon scalded and sliced
thin, a Pound of Sausages out of their skins, and rolled in the yolks of
Eggs, large Mace and Nutmeg, let these stew about one hour, than put in
one Pint of Oisters, some sweet herbs, and a little Salt, stew them
together, then take the bone of Veal and broil it and Dish it, then add
to your Liquor a little Butter, and some minced Limon with the Rind, a
Shelot or two sliced, and pour it over, then lay on it some fryed
Oysters; Garnish your Dish with Barberries and sliced Limon, and serve
it in.


222. _To boil a Neck of Mutton._

Boil it in water and salt, then make sauce for it with Samphire and a
little of the Broth, Verjuice, large Mace, Pepper and Onion, the yolks
of hard Eggs minced, some sweet herbs and a little salt, let these boil
together half an hour or more:

Then beat it up with Butter and Limon; then dish your Meat upon Sippets,
and pour it on; garnish your Dish with the hard Whites of Eggs and
Parsley minced together, with sliced Limon, so serve it; thus you may
dress a Leg or a Brest of Mutton if you please.


223. _To stew a Loin of Mutton._

Cut your meat in Steaks, and put it into so much water as will cover it,
when it is scummed, put to three or four Onions sliced, with some
Turneps, whole Cloves, and sliced Ginger, when it is half stewed, put
in sliced Bacon and some sweet herbs minced small, some Vinegar and
Salt, when it is ready, put in some Capers, then dish your Meat upon
Sippets and serve it in, and garnish your Dish with Barberries and
Limon.


224. _To boil a Haunch of Venison._

Boil it in water and salt, with some Coleflowers and some whole spice;
then take some of the Broth, a little Mace, and a Cows Udder boiled
tender and sliced thin, a little Horse-radish root searced, and a few
sweet herbs; boil all these together, and put in a little Salt, when
your Venison is ready, dish it, and lay your Cows Udder and the
Coleflowers over it, then beat up your Sauce, and pour over it; then
garnish your Dish with Limon and Parsley and Barberries, and so serve
it; this Sauce is also good with a powdered Goose boiled, but first
larded.


225. _To make white Broth with Meat or without._

Take a little Mutton broth, and as much of Sack, and boil it with whole
Spice, sweet herbs, Dates sliced, Currans and a little Salt, when it is
enough, or very near, strain in some blanched Almonds, then thicken it
with the yolks of Eggs beaten, and sweeten it with Sugar, and so serve
it in with thin slices of white Bread:

Garnish with stewed Prunes, and some plumped Raisins.

This may be served in also with any meat proper for to be served with
white Broth.


226. _To make good stewed Broth._

Take a hinder Leg of Beef and a pair of Marrow Bones, boil them in a
great Pot with water and a little Salt, when it boiles, and is skimmed,
put in some whole Spice, and some Raisins and Currans, then put in some
Manchet sliced thin, and soaked in some of the Broth, when it is almost
enough, put in some stewed Prunes, then Dish your Meat, and put into
your Broth a little Saffron or red Saunders, some white Wine and Sugar,
so pour it over your Meat, and serve it in; Garnish your Dish with
Prunes, Raisins and fine Sugar.


227. _To stew Artichokes._

Take the bottoms of Artichokes tenderly boiled, and cut them in
Quarters, stew them with white Wine, whole Spice and Marrow, with a
little Salt:

When they are enough, put in Sack and Sugar, and green Plumbs preserved,
so serve them; garnish the Dish with Preserves.


228. _To stew Pippins._

Take a pound of Pippins, pare them and core them, and cut them in
quarters.

Then take a pint of water and a pound of fine Sugar, and make a Syrup,
and scum it, then put in your Pippins and boil them up quick, and put in
a little Orange or Limon Pill very thin; when they are very clear, and
their Syrup almost wasted, put in the juice of Orange and Limon, and
some Butter; so serve them in upon Sippets, and strew fine Sugar about
the Dish sides.


229. _To make a Sallad with fresh Salmon._

Your Salmon being boiled and souced, mince some of it small with Apples
and Onyons, put thereto Oyl, Vinegar, and Pepper; so serve it to the
Table: Garnish your Dish with Limon and Capers.


230. _To rost a Shoulder of Mutton with Oisters._

Take a large Shoulder of Mutton, and take sweet herbs chopped small, and
mixed with beaten Eggs and a little Salt, take some great Oisters, and
being dried from their Liquor, dip them in these Eggs, and fry them a
little, then stuff your meat well with them, then save some of them for
sauce, and rost your Mutton, and baste it with Claret Wine, Butter, and
Salt, save the Gravie, and put it with the Oisters into a Dish to stew
with some Anchovies, and Claret Wine: when your meat is enough, rub the
Dish with a Shelot, and lay your meat in it, and then put some Capers
into your Sauce, and pour over it, so serve it in; Garnish your Dish
with Olives, Capers, and Samphire.


231. _To rost a Calves Head with Oisters._

Split your Calves Head as to boil, and let it lie in water a while, then
wash it well, and cut out the Tongue, then boil your Head a little, also
the Tongue and Brains, then mince the Brains and Tongue with a little
Sage, Oisters and Marrow put amongst it when it is minced, three or four
Eggs well beaten, Ginger, Pepper, Nutmeg, Grated Bread and Salt, and a
little Sack, make it pretty thick, then take the Head and fill it with
this, and bind it close, and spit it and rost it, and save the Gravie
which comes from it in a Dish, baste it well with Butter, put to this
Gravie some Oisters, and some sweet Herbs minced fine, a little white
Wine, and a sliced Nutmeg; when the Head is rosted, set the Dish of
Sauce upon hot Coals with some Butter and a little salt, and the Juice
of an Orange, beat it up thick and Dish your Head, and serve it in with
this Sauce; garnish your Dish with stewed Oisters and Barberries.


232. _Sauce for Woodcocks Snites._

When you spit your Fowl, put in an Onion in the Belly, when it is
rosted, take the Gravie of it, and some Claret Wine, and an Anchovie
with a little Pepper and Salt, so serve them.


233. _To make Sauce for Partridges._

Take grated Bread, Water and Salt, and a whole Onion boiled together,
when it is well boiled, take out the Onion, and put in minced Limon, and
a piece of Butter, and serve them in with it.


234. _To rost Larks with Bacon._

When your Larks are pull'd and drawn, wash them and spit them with a
thin slice of Bacon and a Sage Leaf between the Legs of every one, make
your Sauce with the Juice of Oranges and a little Claret Wine, and some
Butter, warm them together, and serve them up with it.


235. _To make Sauce for Quails._

Take some Vine Leaves dried before the fire in a dish and mince them,
then put some Claret Wine and a little Pepper and Salt to it, and a
piece of Butter, and serve them with it.

This Sauce is also for rosted Pigeons.


236. _To rost a whole Pig without the Skin, with a Pudding in his
Belly._

Make ready the Pig for the Spit, then spit it and lay it down to the
fire, and when you can take off the Skin, take it from the fire and flay
it, then put such a Pudding as you love into the Belly of it, then sew
it up, and stick it with Thyme and Limon Pill, and lay it down again, and
rost it and bast it with Butter, and set a Dish under it to catch the
Gravie, into which put a little sliced Nutmeg, and a little Vinegar, and
a little Limon and some Butter; heat them together: when your Pig is
enough, bread it, but first froth it up with Butter and a little Salt,
then serve it in with this Sauce to the Table with the Head on.


237. _To fry Artichokes._

Take the bottoms of Artichokes tenderly boiled, and dip them in beaten
Eggs and a little Salt, and fry them with a little Mace shred among the
Eggs; then take Verjuice, Butter and Sugar, and the Juice of an Orange,
Dish your Artichokes, and lay on Marrow fried in Eggs to keep it whole,
then lay your Sauce, or rather pour it on, and serve them in.


238. _To make Toasts of Veal._

Take a rosted Kidney of Veal, cold and minced small, put to it grated
bread, Nutmeg, Currans, Sugar and Salt, with some Almonds blanched and
beaten with Rosewater, mingle all these together with beaten Eggs and a
little Cream, then cut thin slices of white Bread, and lay this Compound
between two of them, and so fry them, and strew Sugar on them, and serve
them in.


239. _To make good Pancakes._

Take twenty Eggs with half the Whites, and beat them well and mix them
with fine flower and beaten Spice, a little Salt, Sack, Ale, and a
little Yeste, do not make your Batter too thin, then beat it well, and
let it stand a little while to rise, then fry them with sweet Lard or
with Butter, and serve them in with the Juice of Orange and Sugar.


240. _To fry Veal._

Cut part of a Leg of Veal into thin slices, and hack them with the back
of a Knife, then season them with beaten Spice and Salt, and lard them
well with Hogs Lard, then chop some sweet herbs, and beat some Eggs and
mix together and dip them therein, and fry them in Butter, then stew
them with a little white Wine and some Anchovies a little while, then
put in some Butter, and shake them well, and serve them in with sliced
Limon over them.


241. _To make good Paste._

Take to a peck of fine flower three pound of butter, and three Eggs, and
a little cold Cream, and work it well together, but do not break your
Butter too small, and it will be very fine Crust, either to bake meat
in, or fruit, or what else you please.

It is also a very fine Dumplin, if you make it into good big Rolls, and
boil them and butter them, or roul some of it out thin, and put a great
Apple therein, and boil and butter them, with Rosewater, Butter and
Sugar.


242. _To make good Paste to raise._

Take to a Peck of Flower two pounds of Butter and a little tried Suet,
let them boil with a little Water or Milk, then put two Eggs into your
Flower, and mix them well together, then make a hole in the middle of
your Flower, and put in the top of your boiling Liquor, and so much of
the rest as will make it in to a stiff Paste, then lay it into a warm
Cloth to rise.


243. _Paste for cold Baked meats._

Take to every Peck of Flower one pound of Butter or a little more, with
hot Liquor as the other, and put a little dissolved Isinglass in it,
because such things require strength; you may not forget Salt in all
your Pastes, and work these Pastes made with hot Liquor much more than
the other.


244. _To make a Veal Pie in Summer._

Take thin slices of a Fillet of Veal, then having your Pie ready and
Butter in it, lay in your Veal seasoned with a little Nutmeg and Salt so
cover it with Butter, and close it and bake it, then against it be
drawn, scald some Goosberries or Grapes in Sugar and water as to
preserve, and when you open your Pie, put in pieces of Marrow boiled in
white Wine with a little blade of Mace:

Then put these Grapes or Goosberries over all, or else some hard Lettuce
or Spinage boiled and buttered.


245. _To make a Pie of Shrimps, or of Prawns._

Pick them clean from their Shells, and have in readiness your Pie with
Butter in the bottom, then lay in your Fish with some large Mace and
Nutmeg, and then Butter again, and so bake it:

Then cut it up and put in some White Wine and an Anchovy or two, and
some Butter, and so serve them in hot; thus you may do with Lobsters or
Crabs, or with Crafish.


246. _To make a Pie of Larks, or of Sparrows._

Pluck your Birds and draw them, then fill the Bellies of them with this
mixture following, grated bread, sweet herbs minced small, Beef Suet or
Marrow minced, Almonds blanched and beated with Rosewater, a little
Cream; beaten Spice, and a little Salt, some Eggs and some Currans, mix
these together, and do as I have said, then having your Pie ready raised
or laid in your baking-pan, put in Butter, and then fill it with Birds.


Then put in Nutmeg, Pepper and Salt, and put in the yolks of hard Eggs,
and some sweet herbs minced, then lay in pieces of Marrow, and cover it
with Butter, and so close it and bake it; then cut it open and wring in
the Juice of an Orange and some Butter, and serve it.


247. _To make a Lettuce Pie._

Take your Cabbage Lettuce and cut them in halves, wash them and boil
them in water and salt very green, then drain them from the water, so
having your Pie in readiness, put in Butter; then put in your boiled
Lettuce, with some Marrow, Raisins of the Sun stoned, Dates stoned and
sliced thin, with some large Mace, and Nutmeg sliced, then put in more
Butter, close it and bake it; then cut it open, and put in Verjuice,
Butter and Sugar, and so serve it.


[Transcriber's note: no number in original] _To stew a Neck of Mutton._

Put your Neck of Mutton cut in Steaks into so much Wine and Water as
will cover it, with some whole Spice, let it stew till it be enough,
then put in two Anchovies, and a handful of Capers, with a piece of
sweet Butter shake it very well, and serve it upon Sippets.


248. _To make a Pie of a rosted Kidney of Veal._

Mince the Kidney with the Fat, and put to it some sweet herbs minced
very small, a quarter of a pound of Dates stoned, and sliced thin and
minced, season it with beaten Spice, Sugar and Salt, put in half a pound
of Currans, and some grated bread, mingle all these together very well
with Verjuice and Eggs, and make them into Balls, so put some Butter
into your Pie, and then these Balls, then more Butter, so close it and
bake it;

Then cut it open, and put in Verjuice, Butter and Sugar made green with
the Juice of some Spinage, add to it the yolks of Eggs.


249. _To make a Potato Pie._

Having your Pie ready, lay in Butter, and then your Potatoes boiled very
tender, then some whole Spice and Marrow, Dates and the yolks of hard
Eggs blanched Almonds, and Pistacho Nuts, the Candied Pills of Citron,
Orange and Limon, put in more Butter close it and bake it, then cut it
open, and put in Wine, Sugar, the yolks of Eggs and Butter.


250. _To make a Pig Pie._

Spit a whole Pigg and rost it till it will flay, then take it off the
Spit, and take off the Skin, and lard it with Hogs Lard; season it with
Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg and Sage, then lay it into your Pie upon some
Butter, then lay on some large Mace, and some more Butter, and close it
and bake it: It is either good hot or cold.


251. _To make a Carp Pie._

Take a large Carp and scale him, gut and wash him clean, and dry him
well, then lay Butter into your Pie, and fill your Carps belly with this
Pudding; grated bread, sweet herbs, and a little Bacon minced small, the
yolks of hard Eggs and an Anchovie minced, also a little Marrow, Nutmeg,
and then put in a little Salt, but a very little, and make some of this
up in Balls, then Lard the Carp, sew up his Belly, and lay him into
your Pie, then lay in the Balls of Pudding, with some Oysters, Shrimps
and Capers, and the yolks of hard Eggs and a little Slices of Bacon,
then put in large Mace and Butter, so close it and bake it, then cut off
the Lid, and stick it full of pretty Conceits made in Paste, and serve
it in hot.


252. _To make an Almond Tart._

Take a Quart of Cream, and when it boils, put in half a pound of sweet
Almonds blanched and beaten with Rosewater, boil them together till it
be thick, always stirring it for fear it burn, then when it is cold, put
in a little raw Cream, the yolks of twelve Eggs, and some beaten Spice,
some Candied Citron Pill and Eringo Roots sliced, with as much fine
Sugar as will sweeten it, then fill your Tart and bake it, and stick it
with Almonds blanched, and some Citron Pill, and strew on some small
French Comfits of several colours, and garnish your Dish with Almonds
blanched, and preserved Barberries.


253. _To make a dainty White-Pot._

Take a Manchet cut like Lozenges, and scald it in some Cream, then put
to it beaten Spice, Eggs, Sugar and a little Salt, then put in Raisins,
and Dates stoned, and some Marrow; do not bake it too much for fear it
Whey, then strew on some fine Sugar and serve it in.


254. _To make a Red Deer Pie._

Bone your Venison, and if it be a Side, then skin it, and beat it with
an Iron Pestle but not too small, then lay it in Claret wine, and
Vinegar, in some close thing two days and nights if it be Winter, else
half so long, then drain it and dry it very well, and if lean, lard it
with fat Bacon as big as your finger, season it very high with all
manner of Spices and Salt, make your Pie with Rye Flower, round and very
high, then lay store of Butter in the bottom and Bay Leaves, then lay in
your Venison with more Bay leaves and Butter; so close it, and make a
Tunnel in the middle, and bake it as long as you do great Loaves, when
it is baked, fill it up with melted Butter, and so keep it two or three
months, serve it in with the Lid off, and Bay Leaves about the Dish; eat
it with mustard and sugar.


255. _To make a Pie of a Leg of Pork._

Take a Leg of Pork well powdred and stuffed with all manner of good
Herbs, and Pepper, and boil it very tender, then take off the Skin, and
stick it with Cloves and Sage Leaves, then put it into your Pie with
Butter top and bottom, close it and bake it, and eat it cold with
Mustard and Sugar.


256. _To make a Lamprey Pie._

Take your Lamprey and gut him, and take away the black string in the
back, wash him very well, and dry him, and season him with Nutmeg,
Pepper and Salt, then lay him into your Pie in pieces with Butter in the
bottom, and some Shelots and Bay Leaves and more Butter, so close it and
bake it, and fill it up with melted Butter, and keep it cold, and serve
it in with some Mustard and Sugar.


257. _To make a Salmon Pie._

Take a Joll of Salmon raw, and scale it and lay it into your Pie upon
Butter and Bay leaves, then season it with whole spice and a little
Salt, then lay on some Shrimps and Oysters with some Anchovies, then
more Spice and Butter, so close the lid and bake it, but first put in
some White Wine, serve it hot, then if it wants, put in more Wine and
Butter.


258. _To make a Pudding of French Barley._

Take French Barley tenderly boiled, then take to one Pint of Barley half
a Manchet grated, and four Ounces of sweet Almonds blanched and beeten
with Rosewater, half a Pint of Cream, and eight Eggs with half the
Whites, season it with Nutmeg, Mace, Sugar and Salt, then put in some
Fruit, both Raisins and Currans, and some Marrow, mingle these well
together, and fill Hogs Guts with it.


259. _To make a hasty Pudding in a Bag or Cloth._

Boil a Quart of thick Cream with six spoonfuls of fine Flower, then
season it with Nutmeg and Salt, then wet a Cloth, and flower it and
butter it, then boil it, and butter it, and serve it in.


260. _To make a Shaking Pudding._

Take a Quart of Cream and boil it, then put in some Almonds blanched and
beaten, when it is boiled and almost cold, put in eight Eggs, and half
the Whites, with a little grated Bread, Spice and Sugar, and a very
little Salt;

Then wet Flower and Butter, and put it in a Cloth and boil it, but not
too much, serve it in with Rosewater, Butter and Sugar, and strew it
with small French Comfits.


261. _To make a Haggus Pudding._

Take a Calves Chaldron well scowred, boiled, and the Kernels taken out,
mince it small, then take four or five Eggs, and half the Whites, some
thick Cream, grated bread, Rosewater and Sugar, and a little Salt,
Currans and Spice, and some sweet herbs chopped small, then put in some
Marrow or Suet finely shred, so fill the Guts, and boil them.


262. _To make an Oatmeal Pudding._

Take the biggest Oatmeal and steep it in warm Cream one night, then put
in some sweet herbs minced small, the yolks of Eggs, Sugar, Spice,
Rosewater and a little Salt, with some Marrow, then Butter a Cloth, and
boil it well, and serve it in with Rosewater, Butter and Sugar.


263. _To make Puddings of Wine._

Slice two Manchets into a Pint of White Wine, and let your Wine be first
mulled with Spice, and with Limon Pill, then put to it ten Eggs well
beaten with Rosewater, some Sugar and a little Salt, with some Marrow
and Dates, so bake it a very little, strew Sugar on it, and serve it;
instead of Manchet you may use Naples Bisket, which is better.


264. _To make Puddings with Hogs Lights._

Parboil them very well, and mince them small with Suet of a Hog, then
mix it with bread grated, and some Cream and Eggs, Nutmeg, Rosewater,
Sugar and a little Salt, with some Currans, mingle them well together,
and fill the Guts and boil them.


265. _To make Stone Cream._

Boil a quart of Cream with whole spice then pour it out into a Dish, but
let it be one quarter consumed in the boiling, then stir it till it be
almost cold, then put some Runnet into it as for a Cheese, and stir it
well together, and colour it with a little Saffron, serve it in with
Sack and Sugar.


266. _To make a Posset Pie with Apples._

Take the Pulp of rosted Apples and beat it well with Sugar and Rosewater
to make it very sweet, then mix it with sweet Cream, and the yolks of
raw Eggs, some Spice and Sack, then having your Paste ready in your
Bake-pan, put in this stuff and bake it a little, then stick it with
Candied Pills, and so serve it in cold.


267. _To dry Pippins about_ Christmas _or before._

When your Houshold Bread is drawn, then set in a Dish full of Pippins,
and about six hours after take them out and lay them in several Dishes
one by one, and flat them with your hands a little, so do twice a day,
and still set them into a warm Oven every time till they are dry enough;
then lay them into Boxes with Papers between every Lay.


268. _To make Snow Cream._

Take a Quart of Cream, and 4 Ounces of blanched Almonds, beaten and
strained, with half a Pint of White Wine, a piece of Orange Pill and a
Nutmeg sliced, and three Sprigs of Rosemary, mix these things together,
and let them stand three hours, then strain it, and put the thick part
into a deep Dish, and sweeten it with Sugar, then beat some Cream with
the Whites of Eggs till it be a thick Froth, and cast the Froth over it
to a good thickness.


269. _To boil Whitings or Flounders._

Boil some White Wine, Water, and Salt, with some sweet Herbs and whole
Spice; when it boils put in a little Vinegar, for that will make Fish
crisp, then let it boil apace and put in your Fish, and boil them till
they swim, then take them out and drain them, and make Sauce for them
with some of the Liquor and an Anchovie or two, some Butter and some
Capers, heat them over the Fire, and beat it up thick and pour it over
them; garnish your Dish with Capers and Parsley, Oranges and Limons and
let it be very hot when you serve it in.


270. _To make a Pie of a Gammon of Bacon._

Take a _Westphalia_ Gammon, and boil it tender with hay in the Kettle,
then take off the Skin and stick it with Cloves and strew it with
Pepper, then make your Pie ready, and put it therein with Butter at the
bottom, then cover your Bacon with Oysters, parboiled in Wine and their
own Liquor, and put in Balls made of Sausage meat, then put in the
Liquor of the parboiled Oysters, some whole Spice and Bay Leaves, with
some Butter, so close it, and bake it and eat it cold, you may put into
it the yolks of hard Eggs if you please, serve it with Mustard Sugar and
Bay Leaves.


271. _To bake a Bulloks Cheek to be eaten hot._

Take your Cheek and stuff it very well with Parsley and sweet herbs
chopped, then put it into a Pot with some Claret wine and a little
strong Beer, and some whole Spice, and so season it well with Salt to
your taste, and cover your Pot and bake it, then take it out, and pull
out the Bones, and serve it upon tosted bread with some of the Liquor.


272. _To bake a Bullocks Cheek to eat cold, as Venison._

Take a Bullocks Cheek, or rather two fair fat Cheeks, and lay them in
water one night, then take out every bone, and stuff it very well with
all manner of Spice and Salt, then put it into a Pot, one Cheek clapped
close together upon the other, then lay it over with Bay Leaves, and put
in a Quart of Claret Wine, so cover the Pot and bake it with Houshold
Bread, when you draw it, pour all the Liquor out, and take only the fat
of it and some melted Butter, and pour in again, serve it cold with
Mustard and Sugar, and dress it with Bay Leaves, it will eat like
Venison.


273. _To make a Bacon Froize._

Take eight Eggs well beaten, and a little Cream, and a little Flower,
and beat them well together to be like other Batter, then fry very thin
slices of Bacon, and pour some of this over, then fry it, and turn the
other side, and pour more upon that, so fry it and serve it to the
Table.


274. _To make fryed Nuts._

Take Eggs, Flower, Spice and Cream, and make it into a Paste, then make
it into round Balls and fry them, they must be as big as Walnuts, be
sure to shake them well in the Pan and fry them brown, then roul some
out thin, and cut them into several shapes, and fry them, so mix them
together, and serve them in with Spice beaten and Sugar.


275. _To make a_ Sussex _Pancake._

Take only some very good Pie Paste made with hot Liquor, and roul it
thin, and fry it with Butter, and serve it in with beaten spice and
sugar as hot as you can.


276. _To make a Venison Pasty._

Take a Peck of fine Flower, and three Pounds of fresh Butter, break your
Butter into your Flower, and put in one Egg, and make it into a Past
with so much cold cream as you think fit, but do not mould it too much,
then roul it pretty thin and broad, almost square, then lay some Butter
on the bottom, then season your Venison on the fleshy side with Pepper
grosly beaten, and Salt mixed, then lay your Venison upon your butter
with the seasoned side downward, and then cut the Venison over with your
Knife quite cross the Pasty to let the Gravie come out the better in
baking, then rub some seasoning in those Cuts, and do not lay any else
because it will make it look ill-favoured and black, then put some paste
rouled thin about the Meat to keep it in compass, and lay Butter on the
top, then close it up and bake it very well, but you must trim it up
with several Fancies made in the same Paste, and make also a Tunnel or
Vent, and just when you are going to set it into the Oven, put in half a
Pint of Clarret Wine, that will season your Venison finely, and make it
shall not look or taste greasie, thus you may bake Mutton if you please.


277. _To make a brave Tart of several Sweet Meats._

Take some Puff-paste, and roule it very thin, and lay it in the bottom
of your baking-pan, then lay in a Lay of preserved Rasberries, then some
more Paste very thin to cover them, then some Currans preserved, and
then a Sheet of Paste to cover them, then Cherries, and another Sheet to
cover them, then any white Sweet-Meat, as Pippins, white Plumbs or
Grapes, so lid it with Puff-paste, cut in some pretty Fancy to shew the
Fruit, then bake it, and stick it full of Candied Pills, and serve it in
cold.


278. _To make Ice and Snow._

Take new Milk and some Cream and mix it together, and put it into a
Dish, and set it together with Runnet as for a Cheese, and stir it
together, when it is come, pour over it some Sack and Sugar, then take a
Pint of Cream and a little Rosewater, and the Whites of three Eggs, and
whip it to a froth with a Birchen Rod, then as the Froth arises, cast it
upon your Cream which hath the Runnet in it, till it lies deep, then lay
on Bunches of preserved Barberries here and there carelesly, and cast
more Snow upon them, which will look exceeding well; then garnish your
Dish being broad brim'd with all kind of Jellies in pretty-fancies, and
several Colours.


279. _To make a Mutton Pie._

Cut a Loin or Neck of Mutton in steaks, and season it with Pepper and
Salt, and Nutmeg, then lay it in your Pie upon Butter; then fill up your
Pie with Apples sliced thin, and a few great Onions sliced thin, then
put in more Butter, and close it and bake it, and serve it in hot.


280. _To poach Eggs the best way._

Boil Vinegar and Water together with a few Cloves and Mace, when it
boiles break in your Eggs, and turn them about gently with a Tin slice
till the White be hard, then take them up, and pare away what is not
handsom, and lay them on Sippets, and strew them over with plumped
Currans, then take Verjuice, Butter and Sugar heat together, and pour
over, and serve them in hot.


281. _A good Sallad in Winter._

Take a good hard Cabbage, and with a sharp Knife shave it so thin as you
may not discern what it is, then serve it with Oil and Vinegar.


282. _Another Sallad in Winter._

Take Corn Sallad clean picked and also well washed, and clear from the
water, put it into a Dish in some handsom form with some Horse Radish
scraped, and some Oil and Vinegar.



283. _To make Sorrel Sopps for Green Geese or Chickens, or for a Sick
Body to eat alone._

Take a good quantity of French Sorrel clean picked, and stamp it in a
Mortar, then strain it into a Dish, and set it over a Chafing dish of
Coals, and put a little Vinegar to it, then when it is thick by wasting,
wring in the Juice of a Limon and sweeten it with Sugar, and put in a
little grated bread and Nutmeg, then warm another Dish with thin slices
of white bread, and put some butter to your Sorrel Liquor, and pour over
them, serve them in with Slices of Limon and fine Sugar.


284. _To make Green Sauce for a powdred Leg of Pork, or for a Spring._

Take a great quantity of French Sorrel, and pick out the Strings and
wash it well, and drain it clean from the water, then stamp it in a
Mortar till it be extream fine, then put in grated bread and beat it
again, then a few Currans and the yolks of hard Eggs, and when it is
beaten to a kind of Pap, put in a little Vinegar and Sugar into it; so
serve it in upon a Plate with your Meat.


285. _To make_ Vin de Molosso, _or Treacle Wine._

Take fair Water and make it so strong with Molossoes, otherwise called
Treacle, as that it will bear an Egg, then boil it with a Bag of all
kinds of Spices, and a Branch or two of Rosemary, boil it and scum it,
and put in some sweet herbs or flowers, according to the time of the
year, boil it till a good part be consumed, and that it be very clear,
then set it to cool in several things, and when it is almost cold, work
it with yest, as you do Beer, the next day put it into the Vessel, and
so soon as it hath done working stop it up close, and when it hath stood
a fortnight, bottle it, this is a very wholesom Drink against any
Infection, or for any that are troubled with the Ptisick.


286. _For a Consumption, an excellent Medicine._

Take Shell Snails, and cast Salt upon them, and when you think they are
cleansed well from their slime, wash them, and crack their Shells and
take them off, then wash them in the distilled Water of Hysop, then put
them into a Bag made of Canvas, with some white Sugar Candy beaten, and
hang up the Bag, and let it drop as long as it will, which if you bruise
the Snails before you hang them up, it is the better; this Liquor taken
morning and evening a Spoonful at a time is very rare.


287. _A Suitable Dish for Lent._

Take a large Dish with broad Brims, and in the middle put blanched
Almonds round about them, Raisins of the Sun, and round them Figs, and
beyond them all coloured Jellies, and on the Brims Fig-Cheese.


288. _To make a Rock in Sweet-Meats._

First take a flat broad voiding Basket, then have in readiness a good
thick Plum Cake, then cut your Cake fit to the bottom of the Basket, and
cut a hole in the middle of it, that the foot of your Glass may go in,
which must be a Fountain-Glass, let it be as high a one as you can get;
put the foot of it in the hole of the Cake edgling that it may stand the
faster, then tie the Cake fast with a Tape to the Basket, first cross
one way and then another, then tie the foot of the Glass in that manner
too, that it may stand steady, then cut some odd holes in your Cake
carelesly, then take some Gum Dragon steeped in Rosewater, and mix it
with some fine Sugar, not too thick, and with that you must fasten all
your Rock together, in these holes which you cut in your Cake you must
fasten some sort of Biskets, as Naples Biskets, and other common Bisket
made long, and some ragged, and some coloured, that they may look like
great ill-favoured, Stones, and some handsome, some long, some short,
some bigger, and some lesser, as you know Nature doth afford, and some
of one colour and some of another, let some stand upright and some
aslannt, and some quite along, and fasten them all with your Gum, then
put in some better Sweet-meats, as Mackeroons and Marchpanes, carelesly
made as to the shape, and not put on the Rock in a set form, also some
rough Almond Cakes made with the long slices of Almonds (as I have
directed before;) so build it up in this manner, and fasten it with the
Gum and Sugar, till it be very high, then in some places you must put
whole Quinces Candied, both red and white, whole Orange Pills and Limon
Pills Candied; dried Apricocks, Pears and Pippins Candied, whole
Peaches Candied, then set up here and there great lumps of brown and
white Sugar-candy upon the stick, which much resembles some clusters of
fine Stones growing on a Rock; for Sand which lies sometimes among the
little Stones, strew some brown Sugar; for Moss, take herbs of a Rock
Candy; then you must make the likeness of Snakes and Snails and Worms,
and of any venomous Creature you can think of; make them in Sugar Plate
and colour them to their likeness, and put them in the holes that they
may seem to lurk, and some Snails creeping one way and some other; then
take all manner of Comfits, both rough and smooth, both great and small,
and colour many of them, some of one colour and some of another, let
some be white and some speckled, then when you have coloured them, and
that they are dry, mix them together and throw them into the Clefts, but
not too many in one place, for that will hide the shape of your work,
then throw in some Chips of all sorts of Fruit Candied, as Orange,
Limon, Citron, Quince, Pear, and Apples, for of all these you may make
Chips; then all manner of dryed Plumbs, and Cherries, Cornelions dryed,
Rasps and Currans; and in some places throw a few Prunelles, Pistacho
Nuts, blanched Almonds, Pine Kernels, or any such like, and a pound of
the great round perfumed Comfits; then take the lid off the top of the
Glass and fill it with preserved Grapes, and fill another with some
Harts-horn Jelly, place these two far from one another, and if you set
some kind of Fowl, made in Marchpanes, as a Peacock, or such like, and
some right Feathers gummed on with Gum Arabick, let this Fowl stand as
though it did go to drink at the Glass of Harts-horn Jelly, and then
they will know who see it, that those two liquid Glasses serve for
resemblance of several Waters in the Rock.

Then make good store of Oyster shells and Cockle shells of Sugar Plate,
let some be pure white as though the Sea water had washed them, some
brown on the outside, and some green, some as it were dirty, and others
worn away in some Places, some of them broke, and some whole, so set
them here and there about the Rock, some edgling, and some flat, some
the hollow side upward, and some the other, then stick the Moss, some
upon the shells, and some upon the stones, and also little branches of
Candied Fruits, as Barberries, Plums, and the like, then when all is
done, sprinkle it over with Rosewater, with a Grain or two of Musk or
Ambergreece in it; your Glass must be made with a reasonable proportion
of bigness to hold the Wine, and from that, in the middle of it, there
must be a Conveyance to fall into a Glass below it, which must have
Spouts for the Wine to play upward or downward, then from thence in
another Glass below, with Spouts also, and from thence it hath a
Conveyance into a Glass below that, somewhat in form like a Sillibub
Pot, where the Wine may be drunk out at the Spout; you may put some
Eringo Roots, and being coloured, they will shew very well among the
other Sweet-Meats, tie your Basket about with several sorts of small
Ribbons: Do not take this for a simple Fancy, for I assure you, it is
the very same that I taught to a young Gentlewoman to give for a Present
to a Person of Quality.




TO THE READER.


_Courteous Reader,

I Think it not amiss, since I have given you, as I think, a very full
Direction for all kinds of Food both for Nourishment and Pleasure, that
I do shew also how to eat them in good order; for there is a Time and
Season for all things: Besides, there is not anything well done which
hath not a Rule, I shall therefore give you several Bills of Service for
Meals according to the Season of the Year, so that you may with ease
form up a Dinner in your Mind quickly; afterwards I shall speak of
ordering of Banquets; but these things first, because Banquets are most
proper after Meals.

All you who are knowing already and Vers'd in such things, I beseech you
to take it only as a_ Memorandum; _and to those who are yet unlearned, I
presume they will reap some Benefit by these Directions; which is truly
wished and desired by_

Hanna Woolley _alias_ Chaloner.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Service for extraordinary Feasts in the Summer._


1. A Grand Sallad.

2. A boiled Capon or Chickens.

3. A boiled Pike or Bream.

4. A Florentine in Puff Paste.

5. A Haunch of Venison rosted.

6. A Lomber Pie.

7. A Dish of Green Geese.

8. A Fat Pig with a Pudding in the belly.

9. A Venison Pasty.

10. A Chicken Pie.

11. A Dish of young Turkeys.

12. A Potato Pie.

13. A couple of Caponets.

14. A Set Custard.


_The Second Course_

1. A Dish of Chickens rosted.

2. Souced Conger or Trouts.

3. An Artichoke Pie.

4. A Cold Baked Meat.

5. A Souced Pig.

6. A Dish of Partridges.

7. An Oringado Pie.

8. A Dish of Quails.

9. Another cold Baked Meat.

10. Fresh Salmon.

11. A Dish of Tarts.

12. A Joll of Sturgeon.


_The Third Course._

1. Dish of fried Perches.

2. A Dish of Green Pease.

3. A Dish of Artichokes.

4. A Dish of Lobsters.

5. A Dish of Prawns or Shrimps.

6. A Dish of Anchovies.

7. A Dish of pickled Oysters.

8. Two or three dried Tongues.

       *       *       *       *       *

_Another Bill of Fare for Winter Season._


1. A Collar of Brawn.

2. A Capon and White Broth.

3. A boiled Gurnet.

4. A Dish of boiled Ducks or Rabbits.

5. A rosted Tongue and Udder.

6. A made Dish in Puff-Paste.

7. A Shoulder of Mutton with Oysters.

8. A Chine of Beef.

9. A Dish of Scotch Collops of Veal.

10. Two Geese in a Dish.

11. An Olive Pie.

12. A Pig.

13. A Loin of Veal.

14. A Lark Pie.

15. A Venison Pasty.

16. A Dish of Capons, two in a Dish or three.

17. A Dish of Set Custards.


_The Second Course._

1. Young Lamb cut in Joints, three Joints in a Dish Larded.

2. A couple of Fat Rabbets.

3. A Kickshaw fried or baked.

4. A Dish of rofted Mallards.

5. A Leash of Partridges.

6. A Pigeon Pie.

7. Four Woodcocks in a Dish.

8. A Dish of Teal, four or six.

9. A cold baked Meat.

10. A good Dish of Plover.

11. Twelve Snites in a Dish.

12. Two Dozen of Larks in a Dish.

13. Another cold baked Meat.


_The Third Course._

1. An Oister Pie hot.

2. A Dish of fried Puffs.

3. Three or four dried Neats Tongues.

4. A Joll of Sturgeon.

5. Laid Tarts in Puff-paste.

6. Pickled Oisters.

7. A Dish of Anchovies and Caveare.

8. A Warden Pie or Quince Pie.


_Note_, That when your last Course is ended, you must serve in your
Meat-Jellies, your Cheeses of several sorts, and your Sweet-meats.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare for lesser Feasts._


1. An Almond Pudding boiled or baked.

2. A Dish of boiled Pigeons with Bacon.

3. A Leg of Mutton, boiled with good Sauce, or a leg of Pork.

4. A Dish of rosted Olives of Veal.

5. A Dish of Collops and Eggs.

6.A piece of rosted Beef.

7. A Dish of Scotch Collops.

8. A Loin of Veal.

9. A fat Pig rosted.

10. Two Turkies in a Dish.

11. A Venison Pasty.

12. A Dish of Pheasants or Partridges.

13. A Dish of Custards in little China Pots.


_The Second Course._

1. Three or four Joints of Lamb rosted asunder, though never so small.

2. A Couple of Rabbits.

3. A Dish of Mallard, Teal or Widgeon.

4. A Leash of Partridges or Woodcocks.

5. A Pigeon Pie.

6. A Dish of Plovers or Snites.

7. A Dish of fat Chickens rosted.

8. A Warden or Quince Pie.

9. A Sowced Pig.

10. A Dish of Tarts of several sorts.

11. A Dish of Lobsters, or Sturgeon.

12. A Dish of pickled Oysters.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare for Fish Days and Fasting Days in Ember week, or in
Lent._


1. A Dish of Butter newly Churned.

2. A Dish of Rice Milk or Furmity.

3. A Dish of Buttered Eggs.

4. A Dish of stewed Oysters.

5. A Dish of Gurnets boiled.

6. A boiled Sallad.

7. A boiled Pike or two Carps stewed.

8. A Dish of Buttered Loaves.

9. A Pasty of Ling.

10. A Dish of Buttered Salt Fish.

11. A Dish of Smelts.

12. A Dish of White Herrings broiled.

13. A Potato Pie or Skirret Pie.

14. A Dish of Flounders fryed.

15. An Eel Pie or Carp Pie.

16. A Dish of fryed Whitings.

17. A Dish of Salt Salmon.

18. A Dish of Custards.

19. A Joll of Sturgeon.

20. A Dish of Pancakes or Fritters.


_The Second Course._

1. A Dish of Eels spichcockt.

2. A Fricasie of Eels.

3. A Dish of fryed Puffs.

4. A Dish of Potatoes stewed.

5. A Dish of fryed Oysters.

6. A Dish of blanched Manchet.

7. An Oyster Pie with Parsneps.

8. A Pippin Pie Buttered.

9. A Dish of Buttered Shrimps.

10. Two Lobsters rosted.

11. A Dish of Tarts of Herbs.

12. A Dish of souced Fish.

13. A Dish of pickled Oysters.

14. A Dish of Anchovies and Caveare.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare without feasting; only such a number of Dishes as are
used in Great and Noble Houses for their own Family, and for familiar
Friends with them._


_The First Course in Summer Season._

1. A Fine Pudding boiled or baked.

2. A Dish of boiled Chickens.

3. Two Carps stewed or a boiled Pike.

4. A Florentine in Puff-Paste.

5. A Calves head, the one half hashed, and the other broiled.

6. A Haunch of Venison rosted.

7. A Venison Pasty.

8. A Couple of fat Capons, or a Pig, or both.


_The Second Course._

1. A Dish of Partridges.

2. An Artichoke Pie.

3. A Dish of Quails.

4. A cold Pigeon Pie.

5. A Souced Pig.

6. A Joll of fresh Salmon.

7. A Dish of Tarts of several sorts.

8. A Westphalia Gammon and dried Tongues about it.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare in Winter in Great Houses._


1. A Collar of Brawn.

2. A Capon and White Broth, or two boiled Rabbits.

3. Two rosted Neats Tongues and an Udder between them.

4. A Chine of Beef rosted.

5. A made Dish in Puffpaste.

6. A Shoulder of Mutton stuffed with Oysters.

7. A fine Sallad of divers sorts of Herbs and Pickles.

8. An Eel Pie or some other Pie.

9. Three young Turkies in a Dish.

10. A Dish of souced Fish, what is most in season.


_The Second Course in Winter in great Houses._

1. A Quarter of Lamb rosted, the Joints Larded with several things, and
rosted asunder.

2. A Couple of Rabbits.

3. A Kickshaw fried.

4. A Dish of Mallard or Teals.

5. A Cold Venison Pasty, or other cold Baked meat.

6. A Dish of Snites.

7. A Quince or Warden Pie.

8. A Dish of Tarts.

9. A Joll of Sturgeon.

10. A Dish of pickled Oysters.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare for Fish Days in Great Houses and at familiar Times._


1. A Dish of Milk, as Furmity, or the like.

2. A Dish of stewed Oysters or buttered Eggs.

3. A boiled Gurnet, or such like.

4. A Dish of Barrel Cod buttered.

5. A Dish of Buttered Loaves or fryed Toasts.

6. A Pasty made of a Joll of Ling.

7. A Potato Pie, or Skirret Pie.

8. A Dish of Plaice or Flounders.

9. A Piece of salt Salmon.

10. A Carp Pie cold, or Lamprey Pie.


_The Second Course to the Same._

1. A Dish of Eels spitchcockt.

2. A Chine of Salmon broiled.

3. A Dish of Oysters fryed.

4. An Apple pie buttered.

5. A Dish of fryed Smelts.

6. A Dish of buttered Shrimps.

7. A Dish of Skirrets fryed.

8. Two lobsters in a Dish.

9. A Dish of pickled Oysters.

10. A Dish of Anchovies.


When all these are taken away, then serve in your Cheeses of all sorts,
and also your Creams and Jellies, and Sweet-meats after them, if they be
required.


Thus I have done with the Bills of Fare in Great Houses, although it be
impossible to name half which are in season for one Meal; but this will
serve you for the number of Dishes, and any Person who is ingenious,
may leave out some, and put in other at pleasure.

      *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare for Gentlemens Houses of Lesser Quality, by which you
may also know how to order any Family beneath another, which is very
requisite._


_The First Course in Summer season._

1. A Boiled Pike or Carp stewed.

2. A very fine Pudding boiled.

3. A Chine of Veal, and another of Mutton.

4. A Calves head Pie.

5. A Leg of Mutton rosted whole.

6. A couple of Capons, or a Pig, or a piece of rost Beef, or boiled
Beef.

7. A Sallad, the best in season.


_The Second Course to the same._

1. A Dish of fat Chickens rosted.

2. A cold Venison Pasty.

3. A Dish of fryed Pasties.

4. A Joll of fresh Salmon.

5. A couple of Lobsters.

6. A Dish of Tarts.

7. A Gammon of Bacon or dried Tongues.


After these are taken away, then serve in your Cheese and Fruit.

_Note_, That this Bill of Fare is for Familiar times.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare for Gentlemens Houses at Familiar Times Winter Season._


_The First Course._

1. A Collar of Brawn.

2. A rosted Tongue and Udder.

3. A Leg of Pork boiled.

4. A piece of rost Beef.

5. A Venison Pasty or other Pie.

6. A Marrow Pudding.

7. A Goose, or Turkie, or Pig.

8. A Sallad of What's in season.


_The Second Course to the same._

1. Two Joints of Lamb rosted.

2. A Couple of Rabbits.

3. A Dish of wild Fowl or Larks.

4. A Goose or Turkie Pie cold.

5. A fryed Dish.

6. Sliced Venison cold.

7. A Dish of Tarts or Custards.

8. A Gammon of Bacon, or dried Tongues, or both in one Dish.


When these are taken away, serve in your Cheese and Fruit as before I
have told you.

       *       *       *       *       *

_A Bill of Fare for Gentlemens Houses upon Fish Days, and at Familiar
Times._


1. A Dish of Buttered Eggs.

2. An Almond Pudding Buttered.

3. A Dish of Barrel Cod Buttered.

4. A Sallad of what's in season.

5. A Dish of Fresh Fish boiled.

6. A Dish of Eels Spitchcockt.

7. An Oyster Pie or Herring Pie.

8. A Fricasie of Eels and Oysters.

9. A Carp Pie cold, or Lamprey Pie.


_. The Second Course to the same._

1. An Apple Pie buttered, or some Pancakes or Fritters.

2. A Dish of fryed Smelts.

3. A Dish of broiled Fish.

4. A Dish of buttered Crabs.

5. A Dish of Lobsters and Prawns.

6. A Joll of Sturgeon or Fresh Salmon.

7. A Dish of Tarts or Custards.

8. A Dish of Anchovies or Pickled Herring.


When these are taken away, serve in your Cheese and Fruit as before I
have told you.

       *       *       *       *       *

Now because I would have every one Compleat who have a Desire to serve
in Noble or Great Houses, I shall here shew them what their Office
requires; And,

First, _For the Kitchin, because without that we shall look lean, and
grow faint quickly._


The Cook, whether Man or Woman, ought to be very well skilled in all
manner of things both Fish and Flesh, also good at Pastry business,
seasoning of all things, and knowing all kinds of Sauces, and pickling
all manner of Pickles, in making all manner of Meat Jellies; also very
frugal of their Lords or of their Masters, Ladies or Mistresses Purse,
very saving, cleanly and careful, obliging to all persons, kind to
those under them, and willing to inform them, quiet in their Office, not
swearing nor cursing, nor wrangling, but silently and ingeniously to do
their Business, and neat and quick about it; they ought also to have a
very good Fancy: such an one, whether Man or Woman, deserves the title
of a fit Cook.

       *       *       *       *       *

_For a Maid under such a Cook._


She ought to be of a quick and nimble Apprehension, neat and cleanly in
her own habit, and then we need not doubt of it in her Office; not to
dress her self, specially her head, in the Kitchin, for that is
abominable sluttish, but in her Chamber before she comes down, and that
to be at a fit hour, that the fire may be made, and all things prepared
for the Cook, against he or she comes in; she must not have a sharp
Tongue, but humble, pleasing, and willing to learn; for ill words may
provoke Blows from a Cook, their heads being always filled with the
contrivance of their business, which may cause them to be peevish and
froward, if provoked to it; this Maid ought also to have a good Memory,
and not to forget from one day to another what should be done, nor to
leave any manner of thing foul at night, neither in the Kitchin, nor
Larders, to keep her Iron things and others clean scowred, and the
Floors clean as well as places above them, not to sit up junketing and
gigling with Fellows, when she should be in bed, such an one is a
Consumer of her Masters Goods, and no better than a Thief; and besides,
such Behaviour favoureth much of Levity. But such an one that will take
the Counsel I have seriously given, will not only make her Superiours
happy in a good Servant, but she will make her self happy also; for by
her Industry she may come one day to be Mistress over others.

       *       *       *       *       *

_Now to the Butler._


He ought to be Gentile and Neat in his Habit, and in his Behaviour,
courteous to all people, yet very saving of his Masters Goods, and to
order himself in his Office as a faithful Steward, charge and do all
things for the honour of his Master or Lady, not suffering their Wine or
Strong Drink to be devoured by ill Companions, nor the small to be drawn
out in waste, nor Pieces of good Bread to lie to mould and spoil, he
must keep his Vessels close stopped, and his Bottles sweet, his Cellars
clean washed, and his Buttery clean, and his Bread-Bins wholsom and
sweet, his Knives whetted, his Glasses clean washed that there be no
dimness upon them, when they come to be used, all his Plate clean and
bright, his Table, Basket and Linnen very neat, he must be sure to have
all things of Sauce ready which is for him to bring forth, that it may
not be to be fetched when it is called for, as Oil, Vinegar, Sugar,
Salt, Mustard, Oranges and Limons, and also some Pepper; he must also be
very neat and handy in laying the Clothes for the Chief Table, and also
the Side-boards, in laying his Napkins in several Fashions, and pleiting
them, to set his Glasses, Plate, and Trencher-Plates in order upon the
Side-boards, his Water-Glasses, Oranges or Limons; that he be careful to
set the Salts on the Table, and to lay a Knife, Spoon and Fork at every
Plate, that his Bread be chipped before he brings it in; that he set
drink to warm in due time if the season require; that he observe a fit
time to set Chairs or Stools, that he have his Cistern ready to set his
Drink in; that none be spilt about the Room, to wash the Glasses when
any one hath drunk, and to wait diligently on them at the Table, not
filling the Glasses too full; such an one may call himself a Butler.

       *       *       *       *       *

_To the Carver._


If any Gentleman who attends the Table, be employed or commanded to cut
up any Fowl or Pig, or any thing else whatsoever, it is requisite that
he have a clean Napkin upon his Arm, and a Knife and Fork for his use,
that he take that dish he should carve from the Table till he hath made
it ready for his Superiours to eat, and neatly and handsomly to carve
it, not touching of it so near as he can with his Fingers, but if he
chance unawares to do so, not to lick his Fingers, but wipe them upon a
Cloth, or his Napkin, which he hath for that purpose; for otherwise it
is unhandsom and unmannerly; the neatest Carvers never touch any Meat
but with the Knife and Fork; he must be very nimble lest the Meat cool
too much, and when he hath done, return it to the Table again, putting
away his Carving Napkin, and take a clean one to wait withal; he must be
very Gentile and Gallant in his Habit, lest he be deemed unfit to attend
such Persons.

       *       *       *       *       *

_To all other Men-Servants or Maid-Servants who commonly attend such
Tables._


They must all be neat and cleanly in their Habit, and keep their Heads
clean kembed, always ready at the least Call and very attentive to hear
any one at the Table, to set Chairs or Stools, and not to give any a
foul Napkin, but see that every one whom their Lord or Master is pleased
to admit to their Table, have every thing which is fit for them, and
that they change their Plates when need shall be; also that they observe
the eyes of a Stranger what they want, and not force them still to want
because they are silent, because it is not very modest for an Inferiour
to speak aloud before their Betters; and it is more unfit they should
want, since they have leave to eat and drink: they must wait diligently,
and at a distance from the Table, not daring to lean on the Chaires for
soiling them, or shewing Rudeness; for to lean on a Chair when they
wait, is a particular favour shewn to any superiour Servant, as the
Chief Gentleman, or the Waiting Woman when she rises from the Table;
they must not hold the Plates before their mouths to be defiled with
their Breath, nor touch them on the right side; when the Lord, Master,
Lady or Mistress shew that favour to drink to any Inferiour, and do
command them to fill for them to pledge them, it is not modesty for them
to deny Strangers that favour, as commonly they do, but to fulfill their
Commands, or else they dishonour the Favour.

When any Dish is taken off the Table, they must not set it down for Dogs
to eat, nor eat it themselves by the way, but haste into the Kitchin
with it to the Cook, that he may see what is to be set away, and what to
be kept hot for Servants; when all is taken away, and Thanks given, they
must help the Butler out with those things which belong to him, that he
may not lose his Dinner.

They must be careful also to lay the Cloth for themselves, and see that
nothing be wanting at the Table, and to call the rest of the Servants to
Meals, whose Office was not to wait at the Table, then to sit down in a
handsom manner, and to be courteous to every Stranger, especially the
Servants of those Persons whom their Lord or Master hath a kindness for.

If any poor Body comes to ask an Alms, do not shut the Door against them
rudely, but be modest and civil to them, and see if you can procure
somewhat for them, and think with your selves, that though you are now
full fed, and well cloathed, and free from care, yet you know not what
may be your condition another day: So much to Inferiour Servants.

       *       *       *       *       *

_To the Gentlewomen who have the Charge of the Sweet-Meats, and such
like Repasts._


_Gentlewomen_,

Perhaps you do already know what belongs to serving in fine Cream
Cheeses, Jellies, Leaches or Sweet-meats, or to set forth Banquets as
well as I do; but (pardon me) I speak not to any knowing Person, but to
the Ignorant, because they may not remain so; besides really there are
new Modes come up now adays for eating and drinking, as well as for
Clothes, and the most knowing of you all may perhaps find somewhat here
which you have not already seen; and for the Ignorant, I am sure they
may ground themselves very well from hence in many accomplishments, and
truly I have taken this pains to impart these things for the general
good of my Country, as well as my own, and have done it with the more
willingness, since I find so many Gentlewomen forced to serve, whose
Parents and Friends have been impoverished by the late Calamities,
_viz._ the late Wars, Plague, and Fire, and to see what mean Places
they are forced to be in, because they want Accomplishments for better.

I am blamed by many for divulging these Secrets, and again commended by
others for my Love and Charity in so doing; but however I am better
satisfied with imparting them, than to let them die with me; and if I do
not live to have the Comfort of your Thanks, yet I hope it will cause
you to speak well of me when I am dead: The Books which before this I
have caused to be put in Print, found so good an acceptance, as that I
shall still go on in imparting what I yet have so fast as I can.

Now to begin with the Ordering those things named to you:

If it be but a private Dinner or Supper in a Noble House, where they
have none to honour above themselves, I presume it may be thus:

In Summer time, when the Meat is all taken away, you may present your
several sorts of Cream Cheeses; One Meal one Dish of Cream of one sort,
the next of another; one or two Scollop Dishes with several sorts of
Fruit, which if it be small fruit, as Rasps or Strawberries, they must
be first washed in Wine in a Dish or Bason, and taken up between two
Spoons, that you touch them not.

With them you may serve three or four small Dishes also with
Sweet-meats, such as are most in season, with Vine Leaves and Flowers
between the Dishes and the Plates, two wet Sweet-meats, and two dry, two
of one colour, and two of another, or all of several colours.

Also a Dish of Jellies of several colours in one Dish, if such be
required.

If any be left, you may melt them again, and put them into lesser
Glasses, and they will be for another time:

If any dry ones be left, they are soon put into the Boxes again.

If any persons come in the afternoon, if no greater, or so great as the
Person who entertains them, then you may present one or two Dishes of
Cream only, and a whipt Sillibub, or other, with about four Dishes of
Sweet-meats served in, in like manner as at Dinner, with Dishes of
Fruit, and some kind of Wine of your own making; at Evenings, especially
on Fasting Days at Night, it is fit to present some pretty kind of
Creams, contrary from those at Dinner, or instead of them some Possets,
or other fine Spoon Meats, which may be pleasant to the taste, with
some wet and dry Sweet-meats, and some of your fine Drinks, what may be
most pleasing.

At a Feast, you may present these things following.

So soon as the Meat is quite taken away, have in readiness your Cream
Cheeses of several sorts and of several of Colours upon a Salver, then
some fresh Cheese with Wine and Sugar, another Dish of Clouted Cream,
and a Noch with Cabbage Cream of several Colours like a Cabbage; then
all sorts of Fruits in season, set forth as followeth:

First, You must have a large Salver made of light kind of Wood, that it
may not be too heavy for the Servitor to carry, it must be painted over,
and large enough to hold six Plates round about and one larger one in
the middle, there must be places made in it to set the Plates in, that
they may be very fast and sure from sliding, and that in the middle the
seat must be much higher than all the rest, because that is most
graceful; your Plates must not be so broad as the Trencher Plates at
Meat, and should be either of Silver or China.

Set your Plates fast, then fill every one with several sorts of Fruits,
and the biggest sort in the middle, you must lay them in very good
order, and pile them up till one more will not lie; then stick them with
little green Sprigs and fine Flowers, such as you fancy best; then serve
in another such Salver, with Plates piled up with all manner of
Sweet-meats, the wet Sweet-meats round about and the dry in the middle,
your wet Sweet-meats must be in little glasses that you may set the more
on, and between every two glasses another above the first of all, and
one on the top of them all; you must put of all sorts of dryed
Sweet-meats in the middle Plate, first your biggest and then your
lesser, till you can lay no more; then stick them all with Flowers and
serve them: And in the Bason of Water you send in to wash the Hands or
Fingers of Noble Persons, you must put in some Orange Flower Water,
which is very rare and very pleasant.

In Winter you must alter, as to the season, but serve all in this
manner; and then dryed Fruits will also be very acceptable; as dryed
Pears and Pippins, Candied Oranges and Limons, Citrons and Eringoes,
Blanched Almonds, Prunelles, Figs, Raisins, Pistachoes and Blanched
Walnuts.


_FINIS._




The CONTENTS of the First Part.


A.

Artichoke Cream.                                       152

Almond Pudding.                                        147

Almond Pudding.                                        144

Artichokes kept.                                       141

Almond Jelly white.                                    140

Almond Paste.                                          126

Almond Butter.                                         120

Apricocks dried.                                       116

Apricocks in Lumps.                                    115

Apricocks dried clear.                                 109

Almond Bread.                                          104

Almond Milk.                                           Ib.

Angelica Candied.                                       98

Apricocks preserved.                                    94

Almond Bakes.                                           88

Almonds candied.                                        85

Almond Butter white.                                    67

Artificial Walnuts.                                     57

Almond Ginger-Bread.                                    59

Ale to drink speedily.                                  42

Ale very rare.                                          41

Aqua Mirabilis.                                          1


B.

Bisket Pudding.                                        146

Black Pudding.                                         143

Bisket very fine.                                      130

Banbury Cake.                                          119

Barberries candied.                                    113

Bean Bread.                                            101

Barberries preserved without fire.                      84

Bullace preserved.                                      74

Black Juice of Licoras.                                 69

Barberries preserved.                                   62

Bisket Cake.                                            26

Balm Water Green.                                       21

Bisket Orange, Limon or Citron.                        130


C.

Clouted Cream.                                         154

Cream of divers things.                                151

Curd Pudding.                                          146

Clove Sugar.                                           142

Cinamon Sugar.                                         ib.

Cake without Sugar.                                    140

Cullis or Jelly.                                       139

Comfits of all Sorts.                                  137

Caudle for a sick body.                                136

Candy as hard as a Rock.                               129

Caroway Cake.                                          112

Cherries in Jelly.                                     108

Cordial for sleep.                                106, 107

Consumption.                                           106

Cordial Syrup.                                         Ib.

Cornish Cake.                                          Ib.

Cakes very fine.                                       105

Cider clear.                                           103

Clear Perry.                                           Ib.

Caroway Cake.                                          102

Cake.                                                   99

Cornelions preserved.                                   95

Currans in Jelly.                                       94

Custard for a Consumption.                             Ib.

Chips of Fruit.                                         89

Chips of Orange or Limon.                               88

Candied Carrots.                                        85

Conserve of Barberries.                                 84

Cordial most excellent.                                 69

Cakes to keep long.                                     82

Cakes with Almonds.                                 48, 82

Court Perfumes.                                         79

China Broth.                                            78

Cristal Jelly.                                         Ib.

Conserve of Violets.                                    75

Cakes very good.                                        61

Cakes of Violets.                                       60

Collops like Bacon in Sweet meats.                      59

Cough of the Lungs.                                    Ib.

Cordial Infusion.                                       58

Cakes very short.                                       57

Conserve of Red Roses.                                  53

Cucumbers pickled.                                      51

Cake with Almonds.                                      47

Cake with Almonds.                                      48

Cordial.                                                45

Cake without Fruit.                                     44

Consumption.                                            41

Chine Cough.                                           Ib.

Cream.                                                 Ib.

Cabbage-Cream.                                          39

Cakes of Quinces.                                       33

Consumption Ale.                                       Ib.

Consumption.                                           Ib.

Cream very fine.                                        31

Cucumbers pickled.                                      30

Candied Flowers.                                        29

Clouted Cream.                                          28

Cough of the Lungs.                                     25

Cordial.                                                14

Cordial.                                                13

Cock-water most excellent.                              11

Cordial Cherry Water.                                    9

Cordial Orange water.                                    5


D.

Damask Powder for Cloths.                              155

Dumplings.                                             148

Dumplings.                                             Ib.

Dumplings.                                             Ib.

Distilled Roses.                                       143

Diet Bread.                                            103

Damsons preserved.                                      96

Damsons preserved white.                                60

Damson Wine.                                            50

Devonshire White-pot.                                   28

Doctor Butlers Water.                                    8

Doctor Chambers Water.                                   3


E.

Elder Water.                                            20


F.

French Bisket.                                         126

Flowers Candied.                                       131

Figs dried.                                            121

Flowers the best way to Candy.                          40

Froth Posset.                                          118

Flowers kept long.                                      83

French Bread.                                           46


G.

Green Pudding.                                         149

Green Ginger wet.                                      133

Grapes dried.                                          132

Grapes kept fresh.                                     131

Ginger-Bread.                                          127

Green Walnuts preserved.                               130

Gooseberries preserved.                                 65

Gooseberry Fool.                                        63

Grapes preserved.                                       59

Gooseberry Wine.                                        50

Gooseberries green.                                     45

Griping of the Guts.                                    43


H.

Hipocras.                                              111

Heart Water.                                            15


I.

Irish Aquavitæ.                                        142

Italian Bisket.                                        111

Jumbolds.                                              184

Jelly of Pippins.                                       97

Jelly of Quinces.                                       91

Jelly of Harts-Horn.                                    87

Juice of Licoras white.                                 80

Jelly very good.                                        68

Iringo Root candied.                                    64

Jelly of Currans.                                       63


L.

Lemonalo.                                              135

Limon Sallad.                                          133

Leach white.                                           104

Leach yellow.                                          105

Leach of Ginger.                                       Ib.

Leach of Cinamon.                                      Ib.

Leach of Dates.                                        Ib.

Limons preserved.                                       89

Leach.                                                  65

Lozenges perfumed.                                      64

Limon Cream.                                            48

[Transcriber's note: there are no page numbers in the original
for some of the following entries.]

Limon Cakes.

Limon Water.


M.

Mustard.

Mustard.

Marmalade of Limons.

Marmalade of Oranges.

Musk Sugar.

Marmalade of Quinces.

Mushroms pickled.

Marmalade of Cherries.                                 116

Marmalade of Oranges.

Marmalade of Cornelions.

Marmalade white.

Medlars preserved.

Marmalade of Pippins.

Marmalade of Wardens.

Marmalade of Damsons.

Marchpane.

Marmalade of Apricocks.

Morphew or Freckles.

Marmalade of Oranges.

Made Dish.

Marmalade of Cherries and Currans.

Marmalade of Apricocks.

Melancholy Water.


N.

Naples Bisket.


O.

Oatmeal Pudding.                                       146

Oranges in Jelly preserv'd.                             77

Orange Pudding.                                         46

Oranges and Limons to preserve.                         56


P.

Pickled Oysters.                                       153

Pickled French Beans.                                  Ib.

Pickled Barberries.                                    152

Poudered Beef kept long.                               154

Pudding to rost.                                       151

Pudding of Calves feet.                                Ib.

Pudding of Rasberries.                                 150

Pudding of Hogs Liver.                                 Ib.

Pudding of Cake.                                       146

Pudding of Rice.                                       145

Paste of Pomewaters.                                   135

Punch.                                                 134

Prunes stewed without Fire.                            Ib.

Pickled Oranges or Limmons.                            131

Potato Bisket.                                         Ib.

Parsnep Bisket.                                        131

Paste short without Butter.                            129

Puffpaste.                                             128

Puffpaste.                                             Ib.

Pistacho Cakes.                                        115

Powder for the Hair.                                   114

Pears or Pippins dried.                                110

Pippins dry and clear.                                 109

Perfume to burn.                                       108

Perfumed Gloves.                                       Ib.

Perfume to burn.                                       107

Pomatum.                                               100

Pippins in Jelly.                                       93

Posset.                                                Ib.

Posset with Sack.                                       93

Posset.                                                Ib.

Plumbs dried.                                           91

Preserved Pears dried.                                  81

Pretty Sweet-meat.                                      87

Paste for the Hands.                                    83

Plumbs dried naturally.                                 81

Pears dried.                                            76

Pippins dried.                                          73

Pippins green preserved.                                71

Peaches preserved.                                     Ib.

Phtisick Drink.                                         67

Paste of Pippins.                                       62

Paste royal.                                            61

Paste of Pippins.                                       54

Paste of Plumbs.                                       Ib.

Plain Bisket Cake.                                      53

Posset without Milk.                                    44

Pennado.                                                43

Purslane pickled.                                       40

Portugal Eggs.                                          29

Perfumed Roses.                                         27

Palsie water by Dr. Mathias.                            23

Plague Water.                                           16

Precious Water.                                          7

Plague Water.                                            2


Q.

Quaking Pudding.                                       147

Quince pickled.                                        141


R.

Roses kept long.                                       140

Rose Leaves dried.                                     124

Red Quinces whole.                                     122

Rasberry Sugar.                                        115

Rasberry Wine.                                          76

Red Roses preserved.                                    58

Rasberries preserved.                                   36

Rosa Solis.                                             14

Rosemary Water.                                          7


S.

Scotch Brewis.                                         143

Syrup of Rasberries, or other Fruits, as Grapes, &c.   135

Syrup of Citrons.                                      134

Sugar Plate.                                           124

Syrup of Roses or other Flowers.                       123

Sack Posset.                                           120

Sillibub.                                              114

Spanish Candy.                                         110

Syrup of Gilliflowers.                                  99

Seed stuff of Rasberries.                               98

Syrup for a Cough.                                      86

Syrup of Violets.                                       86

Syrup for a Cold.                                       79

Syrup of Turneps.                                       68

Signs of Small Pox taken away.                          66

Sugar Plate.                                            56

Snow Cream.                                             55

Shrewsberry Cakes.                                      49

Sillibub.                                               47

Sack Posset.                                            43

Sheeps Guts stretched.                                  40

Samphire boiled.                                        38

Stepony or Raisin Wine.                                Ib.

Sillibub whipt.                                         37

Syrup of Ale.                                          Ib.

Syrup of Turneps.                                       32

Sugar Cakes.                                            31

Signs of Small Pox taken away.                          28

Surfet Water the best.                              18, 22

Sweet Water.                                            18

Snail Water.                                            17

Spirit of Oranges and Limons.                            5

Spirit of Mints.                                         4

Soveraign Water.                                         3


T.

To cast all kinds of Shapes and to colour them.         75

Tuff taffity Cream.                                    112

Thick Cream.                                            40

Trifle.                                                 39

Tincture of Caroways.                                   27

Treacle Water.                                      8 & 16


W.

Walnuts kept long.                                     141

White Plates to eat.                                   117

White Quinces preserved.                                52

Water Gruel.                                            48

Wafer.                                                  35

Water against Infection.                                19

Wormwood water.                                         13

Walnut water.                                           12

Water for the Stone.                                    10

Water for Fainting.                                      6


The End of the Contents of the First Part.




The CONTENTS of the Second Part.


A.

Artichoke Suckers dressed.                             182

Artichoke Cream.                                       184

Artichoke Pie.                                         196

Artichoke Pudding.                                     223

Artichokes kept long.                                  229

Artichokes stewed.                                     277

Artichokes fryed.                                      282

Artichoke Pudding.                                     223

Almond Pudding.                                        161

Apple Tansie.                                          167

An Amulet.                                             168

Almond Pudding.                                        177

Angelot Cheese.                                        202

Apple Puffs.                                           253

Almond Tart.                                           290


B.

Brown Metheglin.                                       159

Beef Collered.                                         160

Barly Cream.                                           162

Barly Broth without Meat.                              188

Barly Broth with Meat.                                 188

Balls to take out Stains.                              228

Broth of a Lambs Head.                                 225

Beef-Pie very good.                                    244

Blanched Manchet.                                      247

Bullocks cheek baked to eat hot.                       299

Bullocks cheek baked to eat cold.                      ib.

Bacon Froize.                                          300


C.

Cheesecakes.                                           163

Cheesecakes.                                           164

Chicken Pie.                                           168

Collar of Brawn.                                       169

Capon boiled.                                          171

Cracknels.                                             172

Codling cream.                                         174

Cheese very stood.                                     175

Cucumbers boiled.                                      182

Collops of Bacon and Eggs.                             187

Cabbage Pottage.                                       192

Capon with white Broth.                                195

Calves foot Pie.                                       ib.

Carp Pie.                                              198

Calves head Pie.                                       201

Calves chaldron Pie with Puddings in it.               207

Coleflower pickled.                                    210

Cheese Loaves.                                         213

Custards very fine.                                    216

Cods head boiled.                                      222

Chicken Pie.                                           226

Capon boiled.                                          236

Chickens boiled with Goosberries.                      241

Chickens baked with Grapes.                            243

Capon baked.                                           245

Cambridge Pudding.                                     249

Chiveridge Pudding.                                    250

Calves Tongue hashed.                                  255

Capon boiled.                                          Ib.

Capon boiled with Rice.                                256

Capon boiled with Pippins.                             Ib.

Chickens boiled with Lettuce.                          257

Chickens smoored.                                      263

Calves feet hashed.                                    264

Chickens in white Broth.                               265

Capon rosted with Oysters.                             271

Calves head with Oysters.                              279

Carp Pie.                                              289

Consumption Remedy.                                    306


D.

Dried Tongues.                                         202

Delicate Pies.                                         215

Ducks boiled.                                          259


E.

Elder Vinegar.                                         159

Eels and Pike Together.                                179

Eels rosted with Bacon.                                180

Eels and Oister Pie.                                   183

Egg Pie.                                               217

Eel Pie.                                               219

Eel souced and collered.                               Ib.

Eels stewed.                                           220

Eels in broth.                                         267


F.

Fresh Cheese.                                          164

Furmity.                                               187

Furmity with Meat Broth.                               189

Furmity with Almonds.                                  Ib.

French Pottage.                                        102

Fricasies of several sorts.                            199

Fricasie of Sheeps feet.                               205

Fried Toasts.                                          209

Fritters.                                              246

Fricasie of Oisters.                                   218

Fricasie of Eels.                                      Ib.

Fresh Salmon boiled.                                   221

French Broth.                                          225

Fine washing Balls for the Hands.                      224

French Servels.                                        230

Florentine baked.                                      242

Friday Pie without fish or flesh.                      Ib.

Fritters.                                              246

Farced Pudding.                                        247

Fricasie of Eggs.                                      248

French Puffs.                                          253

Flounders boiled.                                      298


G.

Green Tansie.                                          167

Gravie Broth.                                          191

Goose dried.                                           193

Goose Giblets with Sausages.                           199

Garden Beans dried.                                    234

Gurnet boiled.                                         238

Goose baked.                                           246

Goose Giblets boiled with Roots and Herbs.             261

Goose Giblets boiled.                                  260

Grand Sallad.                                          268

Gammon of Bacon Pie.                                   298

Green Sauce for Pork.                                  305


H.

Hasty Pudding.                                         199

Hasty Pudding.                                         Ib.

Hasty Pudding.                                         Ib.

Hare Pie.                                              203

Hashed Meats.                                          217

Herring Pie.                                           220

Herb Pie.                                              226

Haunch of Venison rosted.                              273

Haunch of Venison boiled.                              275

Haggus Pudding.                                        294

Hasty Pudding.                                         Ib.


I.

Italian Pudding.                                       254

Ice and Snow.                                          303


K.

Kickshaws to bake or fry.                              254


L.

Lobsters buttered.                                     175

Liver Fritters.                                        177

Loaves to Butter.                                      206

Limon Cakes.                                           212

Loaves of Curds.                                       213

Lobsters rosted.                                       227

Lamb Pie.                                              233

Leg of Mutton rosted.                                  266

Leg of Mutton boiled.                                  238

Leg of Mutton with Oysters.                            270

Loin of Mutton stewed.                                 274

Lark pie.                                              286

Lettuce pie.                                           287

Lampry pie.                                            292

Lenten Dish.                                           307


M. [Transcriber's note: heading omitted in original.]

Metheglin.                                             160

Misers for Childrens Collation.                        208

Minced Pies.                                           212

Made Dish of Rabbet Livers.                            241

Mutton smoored.                                        261

Mutton smoored.                                        262

Mutton Pie.                                            303


N.

Neats Tongue Pie.                                      194

Neats Tongue rosted.                                   239

Neats Tongue hashed.                                   264

Neck of Mutton boiled.                                 274

Neck of Mutton stewed.                                 287

Nuts fried.                                            300


O.

Oatmeal Pudding.                                       165

Olio of several Meats.                                 172

Oysters and Eels in a Pie.                             197

Oysters and Parsneps in a Pie.                         181

Oyster Pie.                                            197

Oranges and Limons in Jelly.                           212

Oisters fried.                                         214

Oisters broiled.                                       ib.

Oysters rosted.                                        ib.

Olives of Veal.                                        222

Oatmeal Pudding.                                       295

Oat-Cakes.                                             232

Olive Pie.                                             223


P.

Puddings in Balls.                                     165

Pigeons boiled.                                        166

Pasty of Veal.                                         170

Pigeon Pie.                                            ib.

Pork rosted without the Skin.                          173

Pig rosted like Lamb.                                  174

Potted Fowl.                                           179

Parsnep Pie with Oysters.                              181

Pig Pie.                                               197

Pudding of Manchet.                                    201

Pompion Pie.                                           208

Pompion fryed.                                         ib.

Pike rosted and larded.                                221

Pomander very fine.                                    224

Pompion Pie.                                           227

Pickled Sprats.                                        223

Pasty of Ling.                                         229

Pallat Pie.                                            231

Pippin Pie.                                            235

Pasties to fry.                                        236

Pigeons boiled with Rice.                              239

Pigeons boiled with Gooseberries.                      ib.

Pippin Tart.                                           244

Pancakes crisp.                                        247

Pudding of Goose Bloud.                                249

Pudding of Liver.                                      250

Pigeons boiled with Capers and Samphire.               260

Partridges boiled.                                     266

Pike boiled with Oysters.                              268

Pig rosted with a Pudding in his Belly.                269

Pippins stewed.                                        277

Pig rosted without the skin with a Pudding in
  his Belly.                                           281

Pancakes very good.                                    283

Paste very good.                                       294

Paste to raise.                                        Ib.

Paste for baked Meat to eat cold.

Pie of Veal.

Pie of Shrimps or Prawns.

Pie of rosted Kidney.

Potato Pie.

Pig Pie.

Pork Pie.

Pudding of French Barlie.

Pomander very fine.

Pudding of wine.

Pudding of Hogs Lights.

Posset Pie.

Pippins dried.

Poached Eggs.

Pippin Paste.

Pippins stewed.


Q.

Quodling Cream.

Quinces to look white.

Quince Pie very good.


R.

Rump of Beef boiled.

Rolls for Noble Tables.

Rolls very short.

Rasberry Tarts.

Rabbets with Sausages.

Rice Cream.

Rabbet boiled.

Rice Pudding.

Rabbet boiled with Grapes.                             258

Rabbet boiled with Claret.                             ib.

Red Deer Pie.                                          291

Rock of Sweet Meats.                                   309


S.

Souced Veal.                                           169

Sauce for Mutton.                                      273

Summer Dish.                                           175

Souced Pig.                                            178

Several Sallads.                                       183

Several Sallads.                                       ib.

Soles dressed very fine.                               186

Spinage Tart.                                          184

Stewed Fish.                                           ib.

Spanish Pap.                                           190

Sallad of cold Meat.                                   193

Sheeps Tongues with Oysters.                           ib.

Scotch Collops.                                        200

Shoulder of Venison, or Shoulder of Mutton
  rosted in Blood.                                     204

Stewed Pig.                                            ib.

Steak Pie with Puddings.                               205

Salmon dressed by Infusion.                            206

Stewed Carps in blood.                                 209

Stump pie.                                             216

Sauce for Fowl.                                        232

Sorrel Sallad.                                         234

Sallad cold.                                           ib.

Sauce for Veal.                                        235

Sauce for a Leg of Mutton.

Souced Fish.

Swan baked.

Small Birds baked.

Stewed Pudding.

Sussex Pudding.

Sausages boiled.

Shell-fish fryed.

Steak Pie.

Shoulder of Venison rosted.

Sallads boiled.

Shoulder of Veal boiled.

Stewed Broth good.

Sallad of Salmon.

Shoulder of Mutton with Oysters.

Stewed Artichokes.

Sauce for Fowl.

Sauce for Partridges.

Sauce for Quails.

Salmon Pie.

Shaking Pudding.

Stone Cream.

Snow Cream.

Sussex Pancake.

Snow and Ice.

Sallad in Winter.

Sallad in Winter.

Sorrel Sops.


T.

To boil a Teal or Wigeon.                              240

Turkey baked.                                          245

Trouts stewed.                                         267

Toasts of Veal fried.                                  282

Tarts of several Sweet-meats.                          302

Treacle Wine.                                          306


V.

Venison baked to keep.                                 178

Umble Pies.                                            243

Veal smoored.                                          262

Veal rosted with farcing herbs.                        273

Veal fried.                                            283

Venison Pasty.                                         301

Vin de Molosso.                                        306


W.

White Broth with Meat.                                 225

White Broth without Meat.                              ib.

White Pot.                                             291

Whitings boiled.                                       298




_Postscript._


Now good Readers, here are three hundred and ten choice Receipts added
for a Second Part of the _Queen-like Closet_, and you may, I am sure,
make many more of them if you observe how many I have taught in one; if
I had not taken that course, only for brevity sake, & that it might not
be tedious and impertinent to you, I might have enlarged this Volume
very much.


_FINIS._





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