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THE LADIES’ KNITTING AND NETTING BOOK.

BY MISS WATTS.


SECOND SERIES.


Second Edition.

ENTERED AT STATIONERS’ HALL.


LONDON:
JOHN MILAND, 35, CHAPEL STREET,
BELGRAVE SQUARE.


1840.


Lessons given in knitting and netting.
For terms and address, apply to the Publisher.

W. DAVY, PRINTER, GILBERT STREET, OXFORD STREET.


[i]

CONTENTS.

PAGE
Gentlemen’s Knitted Gloves 1
Netted ditto 3
Feather ditto 5
Plain open Mittens 8
Another Plain ditto 10
Annet ditto 11
Honeycomb ditto 13
Matrimony ditto 15
Lambs’-wool ditto ib.
Round Netted ditto 17
Mitten, with a leaf wreath round the top 18
Feather Mits 20
Cuffs, Peacock Stitch 21
Netted Cuffs 22
Warm ditto 23
Muffatees 24
Ditto ib.
Gentlemen’s ditto 25
Cushion Cover 26
Sofa Pillow ditto 27
Striped Cushion ditto ib.
Knitted Mat, with Fringe 28
Netted Mat 30
[ii]Vase ditto ib.
Table mats 31
Table ditto, in one piece 32
Napkin Ring 33
A Pence Purse, or Jug ib.
Bouquetier. No. 1. 35
Ditto No. 2. 36
Tidy Basket 37
Ladder Stitch Bag 38
Crossed Stitch ditto 39
Netted ditto 40
Fringe ib.
Netted ditto 41
Scarf ditto ib.
Fringe 42
Rug ditto ib.
Carriage Rug 43
Striped Purse 44
Chequered ditto 45
Purse in Round Netting ib.
Matrimony—For a Purse 46
Another ib.
Annet Purse 47
Honeycomb Purse 48
Another Honeycomb ib.
Netted Purse 49
Single Diamond Netting ib.
Treble ditto 50
Knitted Purse 52
Stitches for Purses. No. 1. 53
Ditto. No. 2. ib.
Ditto.        No. 3. 54
Ditto.        No. 4. ib.
[iii]Ditto.        No. 5. 55
Stitches for Purses. No. 6 56
Ditto          No. 7 57
Bead Netting ib.
Ditto 58
Dice Knitting ib.
Open Fan, for a Quilt 60
Gauffre Fans, for ditto 62
Ribbed Squares, for ditto 64
Open work Fan, for ditto 65
An Open Border 66
Another Border 67
A Last Border, for a Quilt 68
Grecian Border 69
Diamond Knitting 70
Border for a Table Cover 71
Border and Fringe 72
Scarf for the Throat 73
Scarf Edge 74
Scarf 75
Netted ditto 76
Porcupine Boa ib.
Leggings 77
Waistcoat 78
Knitted ditto 79
Warm Tippet 80
Night Cap 82
Ditto 83
Lambs’-wool sleeve 84
Cephaline ib.
Diamond Knitting 85
Another ditto 87
Small Feather Pattern 89
[iv]Double Eyelet Knitting ib.
Gouty Shoes 90
To Increase and Decrease in Double Knitting 91
Double Knitted Soles 92
Lambs’-wool Boot 93
Baby’s Lambs’-wool Cap 94
Ditto Hat ib.
Ditto Stockings 95
Ditto Gaiters 97
Ditto Spencer ib.
Ditto Stays 99
Ditto Socks 101
Netted Curtain 103
Brioche ib.
A Blanket 105
Blanket in strips ib.
Netted Lace 106
Puff Netting 107
A Cool Night-cap ib.
Suspenders 108
Parisian Net Knitting 110
Diamond Knitting 112
Four Patterns for Doyleys, &c. 113
Mazaniello Cap 115
Muff 117
Ditto 119
Terms used in Knitting 120

[1]

THE LADIES’ KNITTING AND NETTING BOOK.

SECOND SERIES.

Gentlemen’s Knitted Gloves.

Four needles No. 15, and fine German lambs’-wool.

Cast on 88 stitches, 28 on each of 2 needles, and 32 on the 3rd, knit round, knitting and ribbing 4 stitches alternately; when you have done about one inch, continue with plain [2]knitting2-* until your glove is long enough to begin increasing for the thumb, which is done by knitting twice in one stitch (that is, when you have knitted the stitch, knit it again at the back before you slip it off the needle,) in the middle of a needle. Knit a plain round; then increase twice in every other round before and after the last increase; continue this until you have stitches enough for the thumb (about 29); take all the stitches except those for the thumb, on two other needles; divide the stitches for the thumb on 3 of your 4 needles and knit round, decreasing gradually at the join towards the end; take the remaining stitches, about 9, on a worsted needle and sew it up. Divide the stitches for the hand again on your needles, taking up 5 stitches at the bottom of the thumb for the gusset; knit two rounds; in the next three rounds decrease 3 stitches of the gusset: knit plain until the[3] glove is long enough to begin the fingers; begin with the first finger, which will require 27 stitches, decrease as you may think fit at the end of the finger. This will leave 25, 23, and 21 stitches for the 3 succeeding fingers. When you have finished the first finger, you must take up 4 stitches at the bottom for a gusset, these may be decreased or not according to the size required.

Netted Gloves.

The mesh to net these gloves should be No. 14, and the netting silk fine.

Begin on a round foundation of 50 stitches; net 6 rounds, net 1 round, putting the silk twice round the mesh, this is to make a place to run the ribbon in; net 6 rounds, then begin to increase for the thumb by netting twice in one stitch, net one stitch, net twice in the next stitch: continue to increase in the same manner every other round, before and after[4] where you increased last, until you have 19 (or 21 for rather a large size) stitches for the thumb; net one round, then net the stitches for the thumb round, when you have done 1 round decrease once in every round at the join for 4 or 5 rounds; net until the thumb is long enough and in the last round take 2 stitches in 1 and sew up the end: (the fingers are finished in the same way.) Fasten on your silk at the bottom of the thumb, and net 4 extra stitches for a gusset; net 5 rounds, in the 6th decrease 2 stitches of the 4; net 10 or 12 rounds according to the size required. Now begin the first finger, for which 16 stitches are required, net round and finish like the thumb; the other fingers are done in the same way, except that you must make a gusset of two stitches, which are not to be decreased, at the bottom of the finished finger, this allows 15 stitches, including the two of the gusset, for the second finger, 14 for the third, and 12 for the fourth. Run a pattern on the back with flox silk.

[5]

Feather Gloves.

Four needles No. 19, and very fine cotton are required.

Cast 64 stitches on 1 needle, and 38 on each of the other two: knit round, knitting and ribbing 5 stitches alternately until you have half an inch. Then knit a round, putting the cotton round the needle, and knitting 2 stitches taken together, this is to make a runner for the ribbon. Knit 3 rounds plain. Knit the stitches of the first needle plain and begin the feather pattern for the back with the second needle, bring the cotton forward knit a stitch, repeat this twice, decrease by knitting 2 stitches taken together 3 times, knit 1 stitch, which is the centre stitch of the pattern, decrease 3 times, increase 3 times, and repeat these 19 stitches until you come to the needle with 64 stitches, which is always plain knitting. Knit 3 rounds. Repeat these 4 rounds until the glove is long enough to begin to increase[6] for the thumb: after the 3 plain rounds, knit 1 stitch, increase 1 by taking up a stitch between 2 stitches, knit 1, increase 1: continue to increase in the same manner before and after the last increase, every other round, continuing the pattern on the 2 needles as before. When you have 9 stitches for the thumb, and have knitted the round without increasing, knit a stitch, bring the cotton forward, knit a stitch, knit 2 stitches taken together, knit a stitch (this is to be the centre stitch of the thumb), knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit a stitch, knit 1 stitch, increase as before.

When you have knitted the 3 rounds, increasing as usual, on the 1st needle, knit 1 stitch, increase 1, bring the cotton forward, knit a stitch, repeat this, decrease twice, knit the centre stitch, decrease twice, increase twice, increase the stitch for the thumb. In the next round of the holes of the pattern you will have 17 stitches for the thumb: increase as usual, knit 2 stitches, increase twice, decrease twice; knit the centre stitch, decrease twice, increase twice, knit 2, increase 1. In[7] future you will have stitches enough to make the pattern down the thumb like the pattern at the back, which is to be done with the 19 middle stitches of the thumb, the rest on either side are to be knitted plain: when you have increased 45 stitches and knitted 1 round, take all the other stitches on 2 other needles, and knit the thumb round, gradually decreasing a few stitches at the join. When the thumb is finished take the stitches for the hand on your needles as before, take up 5 stitches for the gusset at the bottom of the thumb, and continue knitting as before, (on the third needle you will have an odd stitch, which belongs to the 1st needle, it will prevent any mistake if you pass it on to the 1st needle); after doing a few rounds, decrease the gusset stitches until you have 64 stitches on the 1st needle: continue the pattern as before, and when the glove is long enough, begin the 1st finger with the first plain 20 stitches and the opposite 19; knit round, continuing the pattern down the outside of the finger: when you have done this finger, take[8] up 4 stitches for the gusset at the bottom of the 1st finger,8-* 16 plain stitches, and 19 of the pattern. The other 2 fingers are done in the same manner: 14 plain stitches, 19 of the pattern, for the third finger, and 12 plain stitches and 19 of the pattern for the 4th finger, these numbers do not include the gusset stitches.

When finished, sew a piece of lace round the top, and run a narrow ribbon in the holes.

Plain open Mittens.

Begin on a round foundation of 30 or 34 stitches, with a mesh No. 14, and moderately fine silk.

Net 6 rounds, net 1 round with the silk twice round the mesh, (for the ribbon to run in,) and 6 rounds with it once round the mesh; in the next round, net 14 stitches, increase 1 stitch in both the following stitches, complete the[9] round, and net 2 rounds without increase. Increase again in the next round before and after the stitches in which you increased before; net 2 rounds. Continue to increase 2 stitches every 3rd round until you have increased 7 times on each side, (to make the thumb fit nicely, the increase stitches should be made over each other for the last 3 times.) Net 1 round and the 14 thumb stitches. Net the thumb round for a round or two, and decrease by netting 2 together, if necessary, until the thumb fits tight; when it is nearly long enough net 1 round, 2 stitches in every stitch twice round the mesh; 1 round, taking the 2 stitches together, on a finer mesh, and 2 rounds on the fine mesh to finish. Cut off the silk, and fasten it on at one side of the thumb, make 2 stitches on each side and continue to net until the mitten is long enough. Finish the hand in the same way in which the thumb was finished. If it be thought an improvement, the 4 last rows can be repeated at the wrist, or a lace sewn on to finish it.

[10]

Another plain Mitten.

On a smaller mesh than the preceding.

Begin with a foundation of 39 stitches, net 3 rows with the silk once round the mesh, 1 row with it twice round the mesh, and 3 more rows with it once. Now begin to net rounds instead of rows, by netting the last stitch of the row to the first. Net 9 rounds. Net 6 stitches, increase 1 in the 7th, finish the round. In the next round increase a stitch on each side of the stitch added last round, finish the round and net another round without increase. Increase outside the last additional stitches every other round until you have 7 additional stitches. Net a plain round. Next round, increase within the additional stitches; a plain round. Increase a second time within the last increase; net 3 plain rounds; continue to net until you come to the stitch over the last added stitch, net this to the corresponding stitch on the other side of the thumb, net[11] round the thumb (decreasing to make it fit properly) until it is nearly long enough: finish it by netting 1 round with double silk twice, and 3 rounds with single silk once, round the mesh. To finish the hand, fasten on the silk at the side of the thumb, make 2 additional stitches on each side, (if after 2 rows you decrease these 4 stitches to 2 the thumb will set better), and net until the mitten is nearly long enough, then repeat twice the 4 rounds with which the thumb is finished; the last round should be done on rather a finer mesh.

Annet Mittens.

Begin with 60 stitches. Net 4 rows; then net 1 row with the silk twice round the mesh, 2 rows with it once round the mesh, and begin to net rounds instead of rows. In the 1st round, every stitch has the silk passed twice round the mesh. 2nd round, pull the 1st stitch through the 2nd (from the back), net it, pull the 2nd stitch through the middle of the 1st,[12] net it (taking care not to twist it), pull the 3rd through the 4th, net it, pull the 4th through the middle of the 3rd, net it, repeat these stitches until the round is completed. Net 1 round passing the silk twice round the mesh. In the next round, which is like the second, care must be taken that the thick part comes over the open part in the last pattern. In the round which follows, net 11 stitches twice round the mesh, increase 2 stitches in the 12th, net 5, and increase 2 stitches in the 6th. (All the stitches in this round have the silk passed twice round the mesh.) The next round is like the 2nd. Net 1 round twice round the mesh; then 1 like the 2nd. Repeat both these rounds. Net a round passing the silk twice round the mesh, increasing 2 stitches on each side; these additional stitches should be 4 further back than the last were, so as to leave a row of open stitches slanting from the 1st to the 2nd. Net 4 rounds as before. Increase again. Net 4 rounds more, and increase 2 stitches on each side over the last additional stitches. Net 3 rounds, and[13] proceed to make the thumb as directed in the last pattern. When the thumb is nearly long enough, net 1 round twice round the mesh, 2 stitches in each stitch. In the next round net the 2 stitches as 1, and finish with 5 plain rounds, for the last of which use a very small mesh. To complete the hand fasten on the silk at the side of the thumb, make 2 stitches on each side, net the alternate rounds, and finish the hand like the thumb.

Honey-comb Mittens.

Mesh No. 17, foundation 46 or 48 stitches.

Net 3 rows. Net 1 row, putting the silk twice round the mesh; 2 rows once round the mesh; then begin netting in rounds. 1st round, for every stitch put the silk twice round the mesh. 2nd round, (each stitch once round the mesh,) net the 2nd stitch first half turning it; then net the 1st stitch plain. Net the 4th stitch half turning it, then net the 3rd[14] plain, and finish the round in the same manner. Every alternate repetition of the pattern you must plain net 1 stitch before beginning the pattern, so as to bring the thick stitch over the open one. Net a plain round, and begin again with the 1st. The same pattern is continued throughout the mitten, but for brevity the number of rounds only is given. When 6 rounds are done, net 10 stitches increase 2 in the 11th, net 3, and increase 2 more in the 4th. Net 2 rounds, and increase again 2 stitches in the stitch which would have been over the 1st stitch in which you increased, (had you not increased,) net 7 and increase 2 more. Net 2 rounds, and in the next round increase again 2 stitches on each side of the thumb. Net 2 rounds, and increase a 4th time; net 2 rounds, and then net the first and last stitches of the thumb together. Decrease if necessary, and when the thumb is nearly long enough, finish with double silk, 1 round twice round the mesh, 1 round once round, 1 round twice round, and 2 once round the mesh. Fasten on the silk at the bottom of the thumb, add 1[15] stitch on each side, and net the alternate rounds of the pattern until the mitten is long enough to be finished like the thumb.

Matrimony Mittens.

The increase and diminution are precisely the same as in the last mitten; the increase stitches are made in the plain knitted rounds. As this stitch is given for a purse, it is not necessary to repeat it. The mitten must be netted on a foundation of 48 or 50 stitches.

Note.—It will be observed that the last patterns for mittens, begin with rows instead of rounds, this is to prevent the necessity of untieing the ribbon every time the mitten is taken off: a button is fastened to one side of the opening and a loop is made on the other.

Lambs’-wool Mittens.

[16]

This mitten is made open, and when finished is sewn up.

Begin on a foundation of 53 stitches, and with a mesh a quarter of an inch wide.

Net 4 rows. Net 1 row with silk, on a mesh half the size of the 1st. Net 2 rows with lambs’-wool on the 1st mesh. 1 row with silk on the 2nd. Repeat these rows of lambs’-wool and silk 4 times: then in the middle of the row, net 13 stitches of wool on the large mesh, and net the same back again. Net 1 row of silk, 2 of lambs’-wool, 1 of silk, these stitches form the thumb. Begin again on the hand part of the mitten: net 2 rows of lambs’-wool (leaving out the 13 thumb stitches), 1 row of silk, 2 rows of lambs’-wool, 1 of silk, 2 of lambs’-wool, and 1 of silk. All the rows of lambs’-wool are netted on the large mesh; all those of silk on the small mesh. Sew up the thumb and hand, and run a ribbon in at the top of the first row of silk.

This mitten may be made of one, two, or three colours.

[17]

Mitten in Round Netting.

Begin on a round foundation of 44 stitches, with a mesh No. 14.

Pass the needle under the silk every stitch, as directed, in round netting for a purse, throughout the mitten. Net 4 rounds. 1 round twice round the mesh. 2 rounds once round the mesh, increase a stitch, taking care to take the left hand side of the stitch as that by the twist you give the silk will be nearer the right side of the stitch; net 2 stitches, increasing in the last. Net two rounds. Increase 2 stitches in the third round, (the increase stitches are one before and one after the stitches which are over those in which the increase was made last time); increase in the same way 5 times, netting 2 rounds between each increase. Increase over the last added stitches 3 times, and net several rounds until the mitten is long enough for the thumb stitches to be joined together. Join the first and last stitches over[18] the last added stitches, and net round, decreasing occasionally to make the thumb fit. When the thumb is long enough, cut off the silk and fasten it on at the bottom; increase 4 stitches, (2 on each side) and net round until the hand part of the mitten is long enough.

If desired, the hand and thumb may be finished with a narrow lace, or a round of plain netting, 2 stitches in each stitch, which in the next round are netted as one stitch, on a small mesh.

Mittens.

With a leaf wreath round the top.

Four needles No. 16, and two different coloured silks are required, for instance brown and blue.

Cast 30 stitches on each of 3 needles with the brown silk and rib one round. Rib 1 stitch with the blue silk, knit 4 with the brown, knit 2 stitches bringing the silk forward between[19] each, knit 3 stitches, repeat these stitches all round. Rib 1 stitch with the blue, with the brown knit 2 stitches taken together, knit 7, knit 2 taken together, repeat all round and continue these 2 rounds alternately until 5 rounds of holes appear. Knit a plain round of brown; knit 2 plain rounds of blue and increase 2 stitches on each needle. Knit 4 blue stitches and 4 brown stitches alternately, round. Knit 1 brown stitch, knit 4 blue, 4 brown; repeat the last 8 stitches, round. Knit 2 brown stitches, 4 blue, 4 brown; repeat the last 8 stitches round. Knit 3 brown stitches, 4 blue, 4 brown; repeat the last 8 stitches round. Knit 1 round, blue, 1 round, brown, 1 round, blue. Make the other half of the wreath the same reversed. Knit 2 blue rounds, 1 brown round, in the last 2 rounds decrease to 28 stitches on each needle. Bring the blue silk forward, knit 2 stitches taken together, repeat this all round. Knit 1 plain round. Repeat the last 2 rounds until 18 or 20 rounds of holes appear; then with a spare needle take off 14 stitches for the thumb; cast 14 stitches on the[20] right hand needle, and continue the pattern as before until you have 14 rounds of holes above the thumb. Knit the wreath as before and finish with a brown round.

Take up the 14 stitches for the thumb, knit about 14 rounds of holes, and finish with a brown round.

Feather Mits.

These mits are very nice and warm to draw over long gloves in going to evening parties. Four needles, No. 13, and German lambs’-wool are required; the wool should be knitted in shades of either half or a whole skein of wool.

Cast 38 stitches on one, and 19 on each of the 2 other needles. Knit a plain round. Bring the wool forward, knit 1 stitch, repeat this twice; decrease, taking 2 stitches together 3 times; knit 1 stitch, this is the centre stitch of the pattern, and is always plain knitting; decrease 3 times; increase 3 times;[21] repeat these 19 stitches all round. Plain knit 3 rounds. These 4 rounds repeated form the pattern.

Cuffs, Peacock Stitch.

Four needles No. 20, and lace thread or very fine cotton are required.

Cast 32 stitches on each of 3 needles. Purl 3 stitches, knit 3 stitches, bring the thread forward, knit 8 stitches, bringing the thread forward between each, knit 2 stitches, repeat these stitches round. 2nd round. Purl 3 stitches, pass the thread back, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit plain until within 2 stitches of the purl, knit them taken together, repeat all round. Repeat this last round until you have only 15 stitches before and after the purled stitches. Purl 3 stitches pass the thread back, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 2[22] stitches, bring the thread forward, and knit 8 stitches bringing the thread forward between each, knit 1 stitch, knit 2 taken together, repeat this for the round; then begin again at the 2nd round. When the cuff is long enough cast off and sew a bit of lace at each edge.

Netted Cuffs.

Four skeins of colored lambs’-wool and 6 of white; a steel pin No. 14, a flat wooden mesh ½ an inch wide, and a foundation of 120 stitches, are required.

Net 2 rows of colored lambs’-wool with the steel pin; 1 row with white lambs’-wool and the large mesh; then 1 row with the colored, netting 2 white stitches in one, which reduces the stitches to half the number; net another row of colored wool, 1 of white, 2 of colored, &c., until there are 7 rows of white, besides the first, with 2 rows of colored between each. Net 2 rows of colored, 1 of white, netting 2[23] stitches in every colored one, and finish with 2 rows of colored.

Sew it up, double it and run in a ribbon. This forms a very warm and pretty cuff to wear over the sleeve. The white rows are netted on the wide mesh, the colored on the small mesh.

Warm Cuffs.

Two needles are required.

Cast on any number of stitches according to the size of your needles; knit 12 rows plain; knit 1 row putting the wool twice round the needle; rib a row, putting the wool twice round the needle; repeat the last 2 rows until you have about a quarter of a yard, and finish by knitting 12 rows as at first.

Sew it up and fold the top and bottom together.

[24]

Muffatees.

Four needles No. 17, and fine German lambs’-wool are required.

Cast 24 stitches on each of 3 needles, knit round, knitting and ribbing 3 alternate stitches varying the color at pleasure: when the muffatee is about six inches long, begin double knitting24-* on coarser needles; when you have knitted about 2 inches, knit 6 plain rows and cast off; sew up the part that is in double knitting.

Muffatees.

Two middling sized ivory needles and rather fine wool, the color may be varied at pleasure.

Cast on 40 stitches, knit 4 rows; rib 1 row; continue to repeat these rows, reckoning the[25] cast on row as one; when the muffatee is long enough cast off and sew it up.

These muffatees are very pretty, made on fine needles with German wool.

Gentlemen’s Muffatees.

Two needles No. 14, 4 skeins of colored German lambs’-wool and 4 of white.

Cast on 54 stitches; bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, and knit 2 stitches taken together; repeat the same to the end of the row; every row is the same; knit up 1 skein of colored wool, 2 of white, and finish the muffatee with 1 skein of colored wool; sew it up.

These muffatees are also very nice for ladies, to be worn outside the sleeve in very cold weather: they are then knitted with coarse lambs’-wool, the first part done on large needles, the centre on smaller, and the remainder on the large needles again.

[26]

Cushion Cover.

This requires 4 needles No. 16, and moderately fine cotton or German lambs’-wool, white or colored, according to fancy.

Cast 100 stitches on each of 2 needles, and 101 on the 3rd; with your 4th needle knit the 2nd stitch, drawing it over the first; knit the 1st stitch, (which will thus stand 2nd); knit the 4th stitch, then the 3rd, the 6th, and 5th, and continue the same all round, when you will find an odd stitch at the end of your needle, slip this stitch on to the next needle, and continue the pattern as before. You will now find an odd stitch at the end of each needle, which you must always slip on to the next needle.

When you have knitted as much as, when laid flat, will make a square, knit or sew up one end, slip in the cushion, sew up the other end, and surround it with a cord or fringe.

[27]

Sofa Pillow Cover.

Four Needles No. 11.

Cast 74 stitches on each of 3 needles; knit 1 round with the thread twice round the needle; in the 2nd round begin by knitting the 2nd stitch, slipping it over the 1st; knit the 1st; knit the 4th and 3rd stitches, 6th and 5th, and continue the same all round; knit one round with the thread twice round the needle, and repeat the 2nd round; these two rounds form the pattern.

When your work is as long as it is wide, (rather more than half a yard) cast off, and surround it with a cord or fringe.

Striped Cushion Cover.

Cast 100 stitches on each of 3 needles No. 11; knit the 2nd stitch slipping it over the 1st; knit the 1st, knit the 4th before the 3rd, the[28] 6th before the 5th, and continue the same all round. Every round is the same.

Knitted Mat with Fringe.

Four needles No. 14, and rather stout lambs’-wool.

Cast 2 stitches on each of 3 needles; knit 2 rounds; increase by bringing the wool forward before every stitch every 3rd round, until you have 16 on each needle; knit 2 rounds; purl 2 rounds; knit 1 round, increasing (as before) with every 3rd stitch; knit 4 rounds; knit 1 round increasing every 3rd stitch; knit 4 rounds; knit 1 round increasing every 3rd stitch; knit 3 rounds; purl 1 round; knit 1 round; purl 1 round; knit 1 round; purl 1 round; knit 1 round. Take the wool with which you mean to make your fringe and cut it into lengths (you will require as many pieces as you have stitches in a round) about 3½ inches long. Fold the two ends of one of the[29] lengths together and loop in on the needle with which you are about to begin to knit, put the needle through the 1st stitch, hold the piece of fringe with the third finger of the left hand, and knit the stitch, by which you fix the bit of fringe; loop on another piece, place it under the third finger of the left hand and knit the stitch; continue the same all round; in the next round knit each piece of fringe with the adjoining stitch, all round, and cast off.

Turn to the back of your mat and pick up the stitches of the round before that in which you looped on the fringe; knit 1 round, purl 1 round, knit 1 round, purl 1 round, knit 1 round, and cast off.

Cut a round piece of card the size of the mat, cover it with green baize or colored paper, and sew the edge which is under the fringe firmly to the edge of the card all round.

[30]

Netted Mat.

To put between plates.

This mat is netted round. The mesh should be about a ¼ of an inch wide. Net 60 stitches putting the cotton twice round the mesh; net 24 rounds with the cotton once round the mesh, then 1 round twice round the mesh; thread the stitches of this and the first round together, and tie it tight, (this is the centre).

Thread the needle with double cotton; and with a much wider mesh net a round, passing the needle through by the knots of the 13th round for a fringe. The color can be varied at pleasure.

Knitted Vase Mat.

Two needles No. 14.

This mat is to be knitted in two colors, (violet and maize are very pretty). Cast on 3 stitches, increase 2 every row until you have 15; knit[31] 2 rows plain, and decrease 1 stitch in every other row, to a point. Knit 3 pieces of each color, sew them together with the points in the centre, and surround the mat with a fringe. (No. 6 of the former vol.)

Table Mats.

These mats are knitted in 6 pieces, 2 side pieces and 4 end pieces.

Side piece. Cast on 20 stitches, knit 18, turn your work, slip 1 of the 2 stitches on the right-hand needle upon the other needle, pass the cotton back, and replace the stitch as it was before, (this must be repeated every time you return without knitting the whole row, to prevent a hole); knit the 18 stitches back again; in the next row knit 16 and return, and continue to knit 2 stitches less each time until you knit only 2; then knit 4, and continue to add 2 to the number each turn, until you knit 18 and back again; cast off.

End piece. Cast on 20 stitches; knit 3[32] stitches, increase 1, knit to within 2 of the end and return; knit 3, increase 1, knit to within 4 of the end and return; continue to increase in every 4th stitch and to leave 2 more at the end each turn until you have 32 stitches left behind and only 4 knitted; then continue to knit 2 more stitches each time, without increasing any more until only 2 are left behind; cast off.

Join these pieces together with the points meeting in the centre, and surround the mat with a fringe. The size may be altered by varying the size of the needles, and round mats may be made with 6 of the side pieces.

Table Mat.

In one piece.

Cast on 3 stitches, and increase 2 in every row until you have 21; increase 2 stitches in every 4th row until you have 29 stitches; increase 1 stitch in every 4th row until you[33] have 32 stitches; knit 8 rows; this makes half the mat. Knit the other half to correspond, decreasing where you before increased. Surround it with a fringe. The size can be altered by varying the size of the pins.

Napkin Ring.

This ring must be made of string, or stout cord, and with rather fine pins.

Cast 12 stitches on each of 3 needles; knit 4 rounds; rib 4 rounds; knit 3 rounds, and cast off rather tight.

A Pence Purse, or Jug.

Five needles No. 17, and 2 skeins of German lambs’-wool of different colors, are required.

Begin with the handle: cast on 4 stitches and knit backwards and forwards, in common [34]knitting, until it is an inch and a half long; loop 6 stitches on the same needle, 26 on the second, and 10 on the third, (the 5th needle is not required yet). Knit off the 1st needle, knitting 2 and ribbing 2 stitches alternately; with the 2nd needle rib 2, knit 2, rib 2, pass the wool back, slip a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit the succeeding stitches plain until within 7 of the end; then knit 2 taken together, knit 1, rib 2, knit 2; on the next needle rib 2 and knit 2 alternately; continue to repeat this round until you have only 12 stitches on the 2nd needle, and you will find you have made the spout. Knit 3 rounds, ribbing 2 and knitting 2 alternately; take the other color and knit 5 rounds in the same manner, then 3 rounds with the first color, 5 with the second; 1 round of plain knitting with the first color, 3 rounds ribbed, 1 plain round making a stitch between every 2 stitches; 3 rounds ribbed with the second color, knit a plain round; in the next 2 rounds, bring the wool forward and knit 2 stitches together. With the first color, knit 1 plain[35] round and 3 ribbed; repeat the last 7 rounds. Now divide the stitches on 4 needles, (there should be 12 on each,) begin plain knitting, decreasing 1 stitch on each needle; continue the same for 5 rounds, decreasing alternately at the beginning, middle, and end of each needle; knit 3 rounds, decreasing as you think necessary to keep it a good round shape; divide the stitches on 3 needles, knit a plain round, rib 3 rounds without decreasing. Begin again to decrease, and continue to do so, until you have only 3 stitches on each needle; fasten off with a worsted needle, and sew down the handle.

Bouquetier. No. 1.

You will require 5 needles No. 14, and two knots of silver twist.

Cast 6 stitches on each of 3 needles; knit 1 round; in the second round knit and rib 3 stitches alternately, and continue the same for[36] 44 or 48 rounds. Plain knit 1 round, bring the thread forward, (thus increasing by a loop stitch), knit 3 stitches; bring the thread forward, knit 3; and continue the same all round. Knit 2 plain rounds. In the next round bring the thread forward at the beginning and in the middle of each needle, thus increasing 6 stitches in the round. Knit 2 rounds plain, continue to increase in the same manner (6 stitches every 3rd round) until you have 16 stitches on each needle. Knit 8 stitches, with the 5th needle rib the same stitches back again, and continue to knit and rib alternate rows, decreasing to a point by taking 2 stitches together in the centre of 2 rows out of 3. Finish the other 5 leaves in the same manner.

Bouquetier. No. 2.

Four needles No. 14.

Cast 6 stitches on each of 3 needles. Knit and rib 3 stitches alternately for 48 rounds.[37] Then knit and rib alternate rounds, increasing 2 stitches every round where it will be least observed, until you have 40 stitches in the round; turn and knit back again; knit backwards and forwards, decreasing 1 stitch at the beginning and 1 stitch at the end of every row, (for you will perceive those which were rounds have become rows) until the bouquetier ends in a point.

Tidy Basket.

Seven of each needles, No. 16, 14, and 12.

Cast 2 stitches on each of 4 needles, No. 16; knit round, increasing 4 stitches in each round, until you have 9 stitches on each needle; divide your stitches on 6 needles, and purl 3 rounds; knit 3 rounds, increasing 3 times in each of the 2 first rounds, and 6 times in the third. Alternately knit and purl 2 stitches for 3 rounds; repeat the same 3 rounds with the larger needles, No. 14; and 3 rounds more with the largest, No. 12. Knit 1 round plain,[38] and cast off 20 stitches; knit 4 stitches, cast off another 20, and knit the remaining 4 for the handle, until it is nearly 3 inches long; then knit it to the 4 stitches which were left on the opposite side of the basket.

Cover a round bit of card with paper, the color of the basket, and fasten it to the bottom on the inside.

Ladder Stitch Bag.

Two needles No. 12.

Cast on 50 stitches. Second row, knit and rib 2 stitches alternately; and in the 3rd row, knit and rib the same stitches: in the 2 following rows reverse the knitting and ribbing; continue this pattern for 12 rows, and also for 10 stitches at the beginning and end of each row, to form a border all round. Plain knit 1 row (between the borders). In the next row, (after the 10 stitches) knit the 2nd stitch, pulling it over the 1st; knit the 1st; knit the[39] 4th and 3rd, 6th and 5th; continue the same to the end of the row: every row is alike. Continue this pattern until the bag is nearly long enough. Add a border as at first, and make the other side to correspond. Knit or sew up the sides, and run a ribbon round the top.

Crossed Stitch Bag.

Two needles No. 12.

Cast on 50 stitches. Knit one row with the cotton twice round the needle, and in the next row, knit the 2nd stitch, slipping it over the 1st; knit the 1st, then the 4th and 3rd, 6th and 5th, and continue the same to the end of the row. Begin again at the row twice round the needle.

When you have knitted enough for the bag, cast off, and sew up the sides.

[40]

Netted Bag.

To hold the ball when knitting.

These bags are plain netted, and the size of the foundation must of course vary according to the size you wish to have your bag. They are very pretty netted with very narrow ribbon in different colors. The mesh should be rather wide; when the bag is half deep enough, net in a ring, (either brass or whalebone), then net on until the bag is sufficiently long.

Fringe.

Cast on 12 stitches; knit 6 stitches plain, bring the wool forward, knit 2 stitches taken together, bring the wool forward, knit 2 taken together, bring the wool forward, knit 2 together. 2nd row, begin with the wool forward, knit 2 stitches together, repeat this twice and knit the remaining 6 plain; continue[41] these 2 rows until the fringe is the length required, then cast off the 6 stitches for the head and unravel the 6 stitches of plain knitting.

Netted Fringe.

To go round a bag.

Net 300 stitches on a mesh ½ an inch wide. Take a smaller mesh, (No. 15,) and net a row taking 3 stitches in 1. Net a plain row. Net a row, putting the silk twice round the mesh. Net 3 rows once round the mesh. Take a rather larger mesh and net one row, which finishes the fringe. Cut it off of the foundation.

Scarf Fringe.

To be knitted in coarse gold colored flox silk.

Cast on 12 stitches. 1st row, bring the silk forward and knit 2 stitches taken together,[42] knit 2 stitches, bring the silk forward and knit 2 taken together, knit 6 stitches. 2nd row, knit 8 stitches, bring the silk forward, knit 2 taken together, knit 2 stitches, repeat these 2 rows until you have a sufficient length for the end of a scarf, cast off 6 stitches, and unravel those that were plain knitted.

Fringe.

Cast on 9 stitches; slip 1 stitch, knit 2, bring the cotton forward and knit 2 taken together, knit 1, bring the cotton forward, knit 2 taken together, knit the last. Every row is alike. When you have done a sufficient length cast off 5 stitches, and leave 4 to unravel for the fringe.

Rug Fringe.

Two knitting needles No. 11, a ball of coarse knitting cotton, and some yarn or coarse wool are required. Cut the yarn into lengths of about two inches.

[43]

Cast on 30 stitches with the cotton, knit 2 stitches, take 2 bits of yarn, fold the ends together and loop them towards you, on your right hand needle, knit a stitch; loop on the yarn after every stitch until within 2 stitches of the end of the row, which knit. The back row is plain knitting, being careful to knit the yarn with the stitch. Repeat these two rows.

Carriage Rug.

Two needles No. 12, a ball of coarse cotton or fine string, and some coarse yarn cut into lengths of about two inches.

With the ball cast on 40 stitches, and knit 1 row. Knit 1 stitch, place 1 piece of the yarn between the needles so that one end be on each side; knit 1 stitch, pass the end of the yarn which is towards you between the needles, knit 1 stitch, repeat the same to within 2 stitches of the end and knit them plain; knit 1 plain row. 3rd row, knit 2 stitches before[44] you put on the yarn, which will leave you 1 stitch at the end of the row; this altering the yarn stitch makes the mat look thicker. When the strip is as long as you wish the rug to be, cast off and begin another. When the strips are sewed together and lined, this makes a very warm mat.

Striped Purse.

Mesh No. 17; foundation 72 stitches wide.

Net 4 plain rows; net 1 row putting the silk twice round the mesh; in the next row net the 2nd stitch first, (in netting it half turn it), then net the 1st in the same way; repeat these stitches to the end of the row. Net 3 plain rows. Net 1 row putting the silk twice round the mesh, then a row netting the 2nd stitch first, and so on until the purse is wide enough.

N.B. This purse is very pretty with only 2 small rows instead of 4, and netted in shades of different colors.

[45]

Chequered Purse.

Mesh No. 17, and as many needles as you wish to have squares.

Net 6 stitches in pink silk backwards and forwards for 12 rows; net 6 stitches of brown silk, beginning at the distance of 6 stitches from the pink; pass the brown silk through the loop of the pink, and when the rows form alternate squares of pink and brown, begin with the pink over the brown, and the brown over the pink.

Purse in Round Netting.

Mesh No. 14; a foundation 72 stitches wide.

Every row is alike. After the needle has been drawn through the stitch (as in common netting), before pulling the stitch tight, it is passed under that part of the silk which goes through the stitch.

[46]

Matrimony.—For a Purse.

Mesh No. 15, and a foundation of 60 or 70 stitches.

Net 1 row. 2nd row, net the 2nd stitch first then net the first, passing the needle through the second as well as the first, to join them together; repeat these stitches to the end of the row. 3rd row, plain netting. 4th row, net a stitch, miss a stitch, net the next, then net the stitch you missed, passing the needle through the last stitch, (it will be seen that the object in netting a stitch before beginning the pattern is to prevent the joined stitches being over each other); repeat the 2 last stitches to the end of the row, netting the last stitch.

Another.

Begin on a foundation of 60 stitches, with a mesh No. 15. Net a row, passing the silk[47] twice round the mesh. 2nd row, (once round the mesh,) net the 2nd stitch first, half turning it, then net the other plain, net the 4th, half turning it, then the 3rd plain, repeat these stitches until the row is finished. Begin again with the 1st row.

Annet Purse.

Mesh No. 17, and foundation of 60 stitches.

Net the 1st row, passing the silk twice round the mesh every stitch. 2nd row, pull the 1st stitch through the 2nd from the back, net it; pull the 2nd stitch through the middle of the 1st, (taking care not to twist it), net it; pull the 3rd through the 4th, net it; pull the 4th through the middle of the 3rd, net it; repeat these stitches to the end of the row. Begin again with the 1st row, netting 1 stitch plain before beginning the pattern.

[48]

Honey-comb Purse.

On a foundation of 60 stitches. Net 1 plain row. 2nd row, pass the 2nd stitch through the 1st, net it, (in netting it give it a twist so as to half turn it); net the 1st; pass the 4th through the 3rd (half turning it) and net it; net the 3rd; repeat these stitches to the end of the row. Begin again with the first row. Next row net the 1st stitch plain before beginning the pattern.

Another Honey-comb.

On a foundation of 60 stitches. Net 1 row passing the silk twice round the mesh. 2nd row; put the side of the 2nd stitch which is nearest the 1st over it, draw it quite through so as to twist the 2 stitches together, half turn and net it, net the first; repeat these stitches to the end of the row. Next row begin again.

[49]

Netted Purse.

In two colors.

Fill 2 needles with 2 colors which contrast well. The purse should be 80 or 90 stitches wide. Fasten on both needles together and net alternate stitches with each, reversing the colors every row. Except in this change of color, every row is the same.

Single Diamond Netting.

On a round foundation with mesh No. 18; 80 stitches will make a purse four inches wide.

Net 1st stitch with the silk twice round the mesh, 2nd stitch once round, 3rd stitch twice round, 4th stitch once round, and so on alternately. When the round is finished, (it will finish by a stitch once round the mesh,) draw[50] out the mesh, put it in one of the long stitches and net the round; every other stitch will be a loop stitch; the round finishes with a loop stitch. Continue these alternate rounds until the purse is long enough for the opening to be begun; then instead of netting round the purse, turn back and net from side to side. The 1st stitch in the 1st row is once round the mesh, the 2nd twice, the 3rd once, the 4th twice, 5th once, &c. In the 2nd row, the first stitch has the silk passed twice round the mesh; it is then taken at its full length and the row continued, each alternate stitch being a loop stitch. When the slit is long enough, (after either 14 or 16 rows,) begin to net round again. If after 14 rows, the 1st stitch in beginning to net round the purse will be once round the mesh.

Treble Diamond Netting.

On a round foundation of 40 stitches, and with a mesh No. 17 or 18.

Net 2 rounds plain. Begin the next round[51] by putting the silk twice round the mesh for the 1st stitch, net 3 stitches, with the silk once round the mesh; repeat these 4 stitches until the round is completed. Take out the mesh and put it in again at the full length of one of the long stitches; net the following stitch, (which will be a long one), net the next a loop stitch, then net the 2 next close to the mesh and slip them off: begin again with netting the long stitch, the loop stitch, the 2 close to the mesh, slip them off; repeat these 4 stitches to the end of the round, finishing of course with 2 stitches close to the mesh. Begin the next round with 2 stitches close to the mesh, 1 loop stitch, 1 stitch close to the mesh, (this stitch must always be slipped off the mesh before netting the next); repeat these stitches to the end of the round. Next round net 3 stitches close to the mesh, 1 loop stitch; repeat these stitches to the end of the round. Begin again with the 1st round, viz.—1 stitch with the silk twice round the mesh, 3 with the silk once round, and proceed as directed until the purse is long enough to begin the opening,[52] which should be begun in a round after that in which you put the silk twice round the mesh for 1 stitch, and once round it for 3. To make the opening: for the 1st stitch pass the silk twice round the mesh, take it out and put it in again at the full length of the 1st stitch, net a stitch, net a loop stitch, net 2 close to the mesh, slip them off, &c. as directed before. When the slit is long enough, begin to net in rounds instead of rows, taking care to make the diamond stitches match.

Knitted Purse.

Four needles are required.

Cast on any number of stitches that will divide by 5. 1st round; bring the silk forward knit 1 stitch, bring the silk forward slip 1 stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 2 taken together, repeat this all round. 2nd round; plain knitting. 3rd round, is the same as the 1st. 4th[53] round plain knitting. 5th round; bring the silk forward, knit 2 stitches, bring the silk forward slip a stitch, knit 2 taken together pull the slipped stitch over, repeat the same all round. 6th round plain knitting. Begin again.

Stitches for Purses. No. 1.

Four needles are required.

Cast 30 stitches on each of three needles. Knit a plain round. In beginning the next round, knit the 2nd stitch (instead of the first,) knit the first; knit the 4th, then the 3rd, the 6th and 5th, and continue the same until the purse is long enough.

No. 2.

With 2 needles.

Cast on 60 or 80 stitches; bring the thread forward, slip a stitch, knit 2 stitches and pass[54] the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted ones; repeat the same to the end of the row. Every row is alike.

No. 3.

With 2 needles.

Cast on any number of stitches which will divide by 3; bring the silk forward, slip a stitch, knit 2 stitches and pass the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted; bring the silk forward slip a stitch, &c. to the end of the row. Knit a plain row and begin again.

No. 4.

On 2 needles.

Bring the thread forward, slip a stitch, knit 2 and pass the slipped stitch over the 2 which are knitted, repeat the same to the end of the row; knit a plain row. These 2 rows form the[55] pattern, but in the 3rd row you must commence by knitting 2 stitches before beginning the pattern, in order that the 1st of the 2 knitted stitches may come over the hole, and for the same purpose you must begin the 6th row by knitting 1 stitch.

This purse is very pretty knitted in 2 colors, alternately 2 rows of each.

No. 5.

Two needles.

Cast on the desired number of stitches. Knit 1 row taking 2 stitches together. 2nd row, turn the thread round the needle to make a stitch, rib a stitch, make a stitch as before, rib a stitch, &c. to the end of the row. 3rd row, plain knitting; in the 4th row, which is ribbed when you come to the hole, knit the stitch belonging to this and that of the last row together, repeat the same with every hole. Begin again at the 1st row.

[56]

No. 6.

Two needles.

Cast on 90 stitches, slip the 1st stitch and finish the row taking 2 stitches together every time, knit the last stitch. 2nd row, slip the 1st stitch, and with the thread twice round the needle knit to the last stitch, which is to be knitted plain. 3rd row, slip the 1st stitch, pick up the thread which is across the hole with the left hand needle and knit it with the next stitch (which is taken at full length) after twinging the thread forward. Bring the thread forward again, pick up the thread which is across the hole and knit it with the next stitch, continue the same to the last stitch which is knitted. 4th row, slip the 1st stitch, knit the 2nd, pick up the thread which is across the hole and knit it with the stitch which is over the hole, continue the same to the end of the row. Begin again at the 1st row.

[57]

No. 7.

Knit the 1st row (except the 1st and last stitches which are knitted plain in every row) taking 2 stitches together. Knit a plain row. 3rd row, slip a stitch, bring the silk forward, pick up the thread which is across the hole, taking care not to twist it, and knit it with the next stitch, continue the same to the end of the row; the 4th row is plain knitting. Begin again at the 1st row.

Bead Netting.

Net a plain row on a foundation the desired length. 2nd row, net to where you wish to place a bead, slip a bead close up to the last knot and net a stitch; repeat the same wherever you wish to place a bead, and the next row will fix these in their places.

[58]

Bead Netting,

With the bead on the knot.

Thread a bead needle with some of your netting silk; net a plain row; net to where you wish to place a bead, thread 1 bead and slip it close to the mesh, net the next stitch, slip the bead under the mesh close up to the last knot, and pass your needle and netting silk through the bead, which fixes it on the knot; repeat the same wherever you wish to place a bead. This netting may be done either round or open.

Dice Knitting.

For a Purse.

This purse is knitted in 2 colors, it must be done with very fine needles and 11 little balls of fine knitting silk.

[59]

Cast on 8 stitches of the 1st color and 8 of the 2nd alternately until you have 80 stitches, using a new ball for each change of color, 2nd row, knit the 8 stitches of the 1st color, pass that silk round the silk of the 2nd color and bring it forward; with the 2nd colored silk knit the 8 stitches of the 2nd color, pass it round the next silk and bring it forward; continue the same to the end of the row. Knit on in the same manner for 14 rows, then to change the color take another ball of your 2nd color and join it on at the beginning of your row, knit with the 2nd color 1 stitch, pass the 1st color forward, knit 1 stitch with the 2nd color, pass the 1st back, knit 1 with the 2nd, pass the 1st forward, and the same for the 8 stitches. You will now find that you have 2 threads of the 2nd color and 1 of the 1st together, pass 1 thread of the 2nd color round the others and bring it forward, knit 1 stitch with the 1st color, bring forward the other thread of the 2nd color, knit 1 stitch with the 1st, pass the 2nd back, knit 1 with the 1st, and continue the same for the rest of[60] the 8 stitches, when you will find 2 threads of the 1st color, and 1 of the 2nd together; twist and bring forward 1 thread of the 1st color, and knit the others as you did those of the 2nd color in the last square. Finish the row in this manner, then knit as at first until another row of squares is completed; reverse the color again.

This is a nice pattern for a carriage mat done with very large needles and stout wool, and also for many other things, as from being neat on both sides it does not require lining.

Open Fan for a Quilt.

Fine cotton and needles No. 17 or 18.

Cast on 62 stitches. Knit 3 rows. In the next row slip a stitch, knit 5, decrease by knitting 2 together, knit until only 8 are left on the left hand needle, knit 2 taken together, knit the rest, (6 on each side are always knitted plain for the border.) Knit a plain row, repeat these[61] 2 last rows, (decreasing 2 stitches in every other row) twice. Slip a stitch, knit 5, bring the cotton forward and purl to the border stitches, decreasing at the beginning and end of the purled stitches. A plain row. Slip a stitch, knit 5, bring the cotton forward, decrease, purl the rest, decreasing again before the border stitches. A plain row. Slip a stitch, knit 5, decrease, knit the rest, decreasing before the border stitches. Slip 1, knit 5, purl to the border stitches. Slip 1, knit 5, decrease, bring the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, bring the cotton forward, slip 1, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, repeat these stitches, decrease, knit to the border. Slip a stitch, knit 5, purl the rest, knit the border stitches. A plain row, decreasing as before. The last 10 rows to be repeated, decreasing 2 stitches every other row until 14 stitches are left; after this every row is plain knitting, still decreasing every other row until only 2 stitches are left, knit them; in the next row knit them together, and draw the cotton through the last stitch.

[62]

Gauffre Fans for a Quilt.

Cast on 72 stitches. Knit 3 rows; the first stitch of every row is slipped throughout the pattern. In the 4th row knit 4 stitches, counting the slipped stitch as one, decrease with the 5th, knit 60, decrease, knit the remaining 4. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, knit 58, decrease 1, knit 4. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, bring the cotton forward, purl 56, decrease 1, knit 4. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, knit 2, slip 2, knit 4, repeat the last 6 stitches seven times, slip 2, knit 2, decrease 1, knit 4. Knit 5, purl 2, slip 2,62-* purl 4, slip 2 and purl 4, seven times, slip 2, purl 2, knit 5. Knit 4, decrease 1, knit 1, slip 2, knit 4, slip 2 and knit 4, seven times, knit 1, decrease 1, knit 4. Knit 5, purl 1, slip 2, purl 4, slip 2, &c. ending, the row with 1 purled stitch and 5 knitted. Knit 4, decrease 1, slip 2, knit 4, slip 2, &c. decrease 1, and knit the[63] 4 last stitches. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, purl 48, decrease 1, knit 4. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, knit 1, slip 2, knit 4, &c. ending the row with knitting 1 stitch, decreasing 1 and knitting 4. Knit 5, purl 1, slip 2, purl 4, &c. Knit 4, decrease 1, slip 2, knit 4, slip 2, &c. Knit 5, bring the cotton forward, slip 2, purl 4, slip 2, &c. Knit 5, slip 2, decrease 1, knit 2, slip 2, knit 4, slip 2, &c. decreasing 1 stitch in the last 4, slip 2, knit 5. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, purl 40, decrease 1, knit 4. A plain row. Knit 4, decrease 1, slip 2, knit 4, and so on to the end. It will be seen that care is taken to place the 2 middle stitches of the 4 over the stitches which were slipped in the last pattern; when the decrease comes on the slipped stitch it is made not on that but in the following 4. Continue to decrease 2 in every other row. When only 10 stitches are left, every row is plain knitting, decreasing as before every other row until you have only 2 stitches, knit them together and pass the cotton through the last stitch.

[64]

Ribbed Squares.

For a Quilt.

Cast on 2 stitches; knit them. 3rd row, knit 1 stitch, increase a stitch at the back of the first stitch, knit the 2nd and increase again. 4th row, plain knitting. 5th row, knit 2, stitches, increase 1 in the 2nd, increase again in the 3rd, knit the 4th. 6th row, plain knitting. 7th row, knit 2 stitches, increase 1, knit 2, increase 1, knit 2. 8th row, knit 3, purl 2, knit 3. Knit 3, increase 1, knit 2, increase 1, knit 3. Knit 4, purl 2, knit 4. Knit 3, increase 1, purl 1, knit 2, purl 1, increase 1, knit 3. Knit 5, purl 2, knit 5. Knit 3, increase 1, knit 2, purl 2, knit 2, increase 1, knit 3. Knit 4, purl 2, knit 2, purl 2, knit 4. Knit 3, increase 1, purl 1, knit 2, purl 2, knit 2, purl 1, increase 1, knit 3. Knit 5, purl 2, knit 2, purl 2, knit 5. Knit 3, increase 1, purl 2, knit 2, &c. increasing before the last 3. Knit 3, purl 1, knit 2, purl 2, &c.[65] Continue to increase 2 stitches every other row until there are 72, knitting and purling the stitches so as to make them lay in ribs; decrease as you increased, ending with 2 stitches, knit them together.

Open work Fan.

For a Quilt.

Cast on 74 stitches. Knit 6 rows. The first stitch in every row is always slipped. Knit 2 stitches, decrease 1, bring the cotton forward slip a stitch, knit 2, pull the slipped stitch over the 2 knitted, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 2, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted; repeat these stitches until only 4 are left on the left hand needle, decrease 1 and knit the 2 last. Knit 3 stitches, purl 66, knit the 3 last. Knit 2, decrease 1, knit 1, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 2, and pull the slipped stitch over the knitted, repeat these stitches until only 4 stitches are left on the needle, decrease, and knit 2. Knit 3, purl 64,[66] knit 3. Knit 2, decrease 1, knit 2, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 2, pull the slipped stitch over those which are knitted; repeat these stitches, as before, decrease and knit the 2 last. Knit 3, purl 62, knit 3. Knit 2, decrease 1, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 2, pull the slipped over the knitted stitches, repeat these 3 stitches, bringing the cotton forward before slipping the 1st; when only 4 are left decrease, and knit the 2 last. Knit 3, purl 60, knit 3. Repeat these alternate rows, decreasing 2 stitches every other row (taking care that the first slipped stitch is immediately before the stitch which is over the hole) until only 6 stitches are left. Knit every row plain decreasing as before until only 2 stitches are left, knit them together and pass the cotton through the remaining stitch.

An open Border.

Any number of stitches may be set up, that will divide by 3. Slip the 1st stitch, bring[67] the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit a stitch, pull the 2nd slipped stitch over the 3rd stitch; repeat these 3 stitches to the end of the row. 2nd row, plain knitting. 3rd row ribbed. Then begin with the first row again.

A few plain knitted stitches for a border are a great improvement.

Another Border.

Cast on any even number of stitches. Rib each row with the exception of 3 stitches on each side for the border, which are knitted plain. When you have 4 ribs on the right side, knit a plain row. Knit the 3 border stitches, leave the cotton on the outside of the needle and rib 2 stitches taken together, this makes a loop stitch; pass the cotton back and repeat these 2 stitches until you come to the border. The next row is plain knitting. Then rib again backwards and forwards until you come to the row before the holes, which is again to be plain knitting. To be sure that your[68] pattern is right you must be able to count 7 ridges on the wrong side, and 4 on the right.

A Last Border.

For a Quilt.

Two needles No. 16, and medium sized cotton.

Cast on 101 stitches (or any uneven number). 1st row, knit the second stitch first, drawing it over the 1st, knit the 1st, knit the 4th and 3rd, 6th and 5th, and repeat the same until you come to the last, which knit. 2nd row, purl the 1st stitch, taking 2 stitches together as if you were going to decrease, but pick up again the stitch nearest to the right hand and purl it. Repeat the same to the last stitch, which is to be purled. Begin again at the 1st row.

[69]

Grecian Border.

Two needles No. 14, and coarse cotton.

Cast on 28 stitches. 1st row, rib 4, knit 12, rib 4, knit 4, rib 4. 2nd row, all purled. 3rd row is the same as the 1st. 4th row, purl. 5th row, the same as the 1st. 6th row, purl. 7th row, same as the 1st. 8th row, purled. 9th row, purl 4, knit 4, purl 12, knit 4, purl 4. The back rows are all purled. 11th, 13th, and 15th like the 9th. 17th, 19th, 21st, and 23rd rows, purl 4, knit 4, purl 4, knit 12, purl 4. 25th 27th 29th and 31st rows, purl 4, knit 4, purl 4, knit 4, purl 12. 33rd 35th 37th and 39th rows, purl 4, knit 20, purl 4. 41st, 43rd, 45th and 47th rows, purl 12, knit 4, purl 4, knit 4, and purl 4. Begin again with the 1st row.

[70]

Diamond Knitting.

For a Quilt Border.

Cast on 57 stitches, 10 on each side are for the border, and are always plain knitting. Knit the border, knit 1 stitch, bring the cotton forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1, and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 7, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, and repeat from the border: your number of stitches should always be the same. Back row, knit the border stitches, and rib the rest; every back row is the same. Knit to where you decreased last, bring the cotton forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1, and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 5 stitches, decrease by taking 2 stitches in 1, bring the cotton forward, knit 3, repeat the last 12 stitches to the border. Back row. You are to continue increasing and decreasing in the same manner until you have only 3 stitches between the increases, then decrease at the sides of the diamond which you have[71] made by increasing, and increase on each side before and after the decrease. You will now have enough of the pattern done to see how to proceed.

Observe that when you have only 3 stitches at the top of the diamond you have been decreasing, and the back row is done, you begin to decrease the other diamond. Also, that after the 1st diamond is done, your greatest number of plain stitches between the decrease will be 5.

Border for a Table Cover.

Cast on 90 stitches. Knit the 1st stitch, bring the thread forward, slip a stitch, knit 2 taken together, bring the thread forward, slip a stitch, &c. to the end of the row, where you will find but 1 stitch to knit after the last slipped stitch. Continue the pattern (observing to begin every row with one plain knitted stitch) until you have enough in length, then cast off.

[72]

This border in crimson cotton or German lambs’-wool, is a nice finish to a dark cloth cover.

Border and Fringe.

In 2 colors; for a Table cover or Shawl.

Cast on 28 stitches with the first color. Knit 2 stitches with the 2nd color, knit 2 stitches with the 1st color, 2 with the 2nd, 2 with the 1st, and continue the same to the end of the row, which will be 2 stitches of the 1st color. Begin the next row by knitting 2 stitches of the 1st color, pass the thread forward, place it under the thumb of the left hand, pass the 2nd color back and knit 2 stitches, continue the same to the end of the row, and then begin again at the 2nd row only observing to knit the 2nd color over the 1st and the 1st over the 2nd. After 2 more rows, reverse the colors again.

When you have a sufficient length cast off 20 stitches and unravel 8 for the Fringe.

[73]

Scarf for the Throat.

It will require 2 needles No. 12, and Scarlet German Lambs’-wool.

Cast on 86 stitches; knit and rib 4 stitches alternately, but as 86 cannot divide by 4, you must knit 5 instead in two places in the course of the row. After 4 rows in this manner reverse the knitting and ribbing for 4 rows; continue this pattern for about a quarter of a yard, (and also for 12 stitches at each end of every succeeding row) and commence the second pattern between the 12 border stitches. 1st row; knit 2 stitches taken together, plain knit 8 stitches, rib 3; repeat the same until you come to the 12 stitches of the border. 2nd row; (after the border) rib 8 stitches, bring the wool forward, give it a twist round the needle (to increase 1 stitch) and rib 1 stitch, knit 3, repeat this to the border. 3rd row; knit 2 stitches, knit 2 taken together, knit 6, rib 3, &c. 4th row; rib 6 stitches, increase 1, rib 3, knit 3, &c. 5th row; knit 4,[74] take 2 together, knit 4, rib 3, &c. 6th row; rib 4, increase 1, rib 5, knit 3, &c. 7th row; knit 6, take 2 together, rib 3, &c. 8th row; rib 2, increase 1, rib 7, knit 3, &c. 9th row; knit 8, knit 2 together, rib 3, &c. 10th row; rib 1, increase 1, rib 8, knit 3, &c. 11th row; knit 6, knit 2 taken together, knit 2, rib 3, &c. 12th row; rib 3, increase 1, rib 6, knit 3, &c. 13th row; knit 4, knit 2 together, knit 4, rib 3, &c. 14th row; rib 4, increase 1, rib 5, knit 3, &c. 15th row; knit 2, knit 2 together, knit 6, rib 3, &c. 16th row; rib 6, increase 1, rib 3, knit 3, &c. Begin again at the 1st row of the second pattern, and repeat the pattern until the scarf is nearly long enough, then finish with the border as at first. Sew the undermentioned edge to the sides and a piece of Scarf Fringe to the ends.

Scarf Edge.

Two needles and gold colored flox silk.

Cast on 6 stitches. 1st row; bring the silk[75] forward and knit 2 stitches taken together, knit 2 stitches, bring the silk forward and knit 2 taken together. 2nd row; knit 2 stitches, bring the silk forward and knit 2 taken together, knit 2 stitches.

A repetition of these 2 rows forms the pattern.

Scarf.

Two needles No. 7.

Cast on 80 stitches; pass the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit a stitch, pass the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 1 stitch, rib 1 stitch, continue this to the end of the row; every row is the same.

This scarf takes about 2½ ounces of German lambs’-wool; it requires a wide fringe at the end and is very pretty if knitted with shaded ends, which are done by using successively 2 skeins of 5 or 6 shades of the desired color, beginning with the darkest.

[76]

Netted Scarf.

On a foundation of 54 stitches.

Net successively 6 rows of the following colors; waterloo blue, scarlet, amber, blue, yellow, scarlet, dark blue, amber, scarlet, light blue, amber, and scarlet.

Porcupine Boa.

Four needles No. 15, and fine German lambs’-wool are required.

Cast 36 stitches on each of 3 needles, knit 4 stitches, bring the wool forward, knit a stitch—this is the centre stitch of the pattern—bring the wool forward, knit 4 stitches, slip a stitch taking it under, knit 2 taken together, pull the slipped stitch over it, then begin knitting the 4 stitches, &c. It is better at the end of each needle to knit 1 stitch off the next one, as it prepares for the next round; continue[77] this for 6 rounds, increasing before and after every centre stitch, and knitting to within 1 of where you decreased, which stitch slip, knit the next 2 together, and pull the slipped stitch over it. Knit 3 plain rounds. Knit to within 1 stitch of the centre stitch, slip it; knit 2 together, these 6 rounds increase each side of the stitch with which you decreased in the last pattern, which makes that the centre stitch this time.

Your number should always be the same as you began with: it is easy to count the number of rounds you have done, at the place where you decrease.

This boa is knitted with the wrong side outwards. When finished, fill it with cotton wool and put strings to it.

Leggings.

Two ivory needles and rather fine lambs’-wool are required.

Cast on 44 stitches, knit 7 rows, then knit 2[78] inches, knitting and ribbing 2 stitches alternately; knit 8 rows, continue plain knitting and increase at the beginning and ending of every 4th row; when you have 60 stitches knit 4 rows, then decrease in the same proportion as you increased until you have but 52 stitches; knit 6 rows, and finish to match the top. Sew them up.

Waistcoat.

Large Size.

Cast on 68 stitches, knit 38 rows; cast on 14 stitches, knit 26 rows, cast off 34 stitches, knit 4 rows, cast on 26, knit 68 rows, cast off 26 stitches, knit 4 rows, cast on 34 stitches, knit 26 rows, cast off 14 stitches, knit 38 rows.

The Sleeve.

Cast on 45 stitches, knit 90 rows, decrease 1 in each row, which leaves a narrow bit to tack[79] to the shoulder strap, and leaves the sleeve open under the arm.

Knitted Waistcoat.

Cast on 54 stitches; knit 38 rows, cast on 14 stitches, knit 14 rows; cast off 34 stitches, knit 4 rows. Cast on 26 stitches, knit 66 rows, cast off 26 stitches, knit 4 rows, cast on 34 stitches, knit 14 rows, cast off 14 stitches, and knit 38 rows.

Sleeves.

Cast on 43 stitches, add 1 stitch each row until there are 60, knit 9 rows. Decrease 1 stitch in each row for 8 rows, then 3 in each row for 19.

[80]

Warm Tippet.

Two needles, No. 11.

Cast on 60 stitches, bring the thread forward, slip a stitch and knit 2 taken together, and continue to knit in the same manner for 10 rows, then knit (still observing the same stitch) 6 stitches, (2 repetitions of the pattern), and back; knit 12 stitches and back; 18 and back; and knit backwards and forwards in this manner advancing 6 stitches farther each time until you have but 6 stitches left behind, then knit fewer stitches by 6 than in the last row, and knit backwards and forwards receding 6 stitches each time until you knit only 6 and return: you have now completed the first of the gussets which shape the tippet. Knit 6 stitches, bring the thread forward as if to continue the pattern, pick up a stitch between the stitches and purl it, bring the thread forward, slip a stitch and knit 2 together; continue the same stitch to the end of the row without any[81] more increase. In the next row knit 2 stitches in the increased stitch, and in the following row, when you come to the increased stitches, bring the thread forward, slip a stitch and knit 1 (instead of 2,) you have thus added 1 stripe to your row; knit 4 rows, and in the next row begin to add another stripe to your row within the first 6 stitches; by the time this stripe is made, you will have knitted 10 entire rows. Knit 6 stitches and return, and knit as before (for the gusset) until you come to the row in which you knit to within 6 of the end, then knit a smaller number each time until you knit only 6 stitches and return. Knit a whole row, increasing after the 6th stitch, and add 2 stripes to the row, (as described in the 48th row.) Knit in the gusset again, and then in 10 whole rows add 2 stripes as before; knit the gusset, (which of course increases in size with the increased number of stitches.) Add 2 stripes. Knit a gusset. Knit 6 stitches, pass the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, take 2 stitches upon another needle, slip another stitch, and, passing the 2 stitches, knit the 4 stitches[82] together, bring the thread forward and go on. In the next row, when you come to where you have decreased, it will be necessary to knit 3 stitches together instead of 2. Decrease in the same manner twice in the 10 complete rows. Knit in a gusset. Decrease 4 times in the 10 whole rows. Knit a gusset. Knit 20 whole rows. This completes half of the cape; the other half must be knitted to correspond, only that you must increase where before you decreased, and decrease where you increased.

Night Cap.

With moderately fine cotton and 5 needles.

Cast 2 stitches on each of 4 needles: increase 2 stitches on each needle; in the next round, increase 1 stitch on each needle; make a seam in the middle of each needle and increase on each side of it every other round, until you have a sufficient number of stitches[83] for the size of your cap. Leave off seaming the middle stitches and knit round until your cap is ¾ of a yard long, then finish the end like the beginning, decreasing where you before increased.

Night Cap.

French Pattern.

Cast 2 stitches on each of 4 needles, knit round increasing them to 4, next round increase 1 on each needle and make seams of the centre stitches. Knit round increasing 1 stitch on each side of the seam (leaving 3 stitches between the 2 that are increased) on each needle. When your cap is large enough round, leave off seaming and knit round until the cap is ¾ of a yard long: make the end like the beginning.

[84]

Lambs’-wool Sleeve.

Cast on each of 3 needles 18 or 24 stitches according to the size of the sleeve wished for; knit and rib 3 stitches alternately until the sleeve is about 3 inches long. Then take coarser needles and coarser lambs’-wool and knit plain until the sleeve is nearly long enough, and finish by ribbing it again for about an inch and a half.

Cephaline.

To be worn on the head on leaving heated rooms.

A mesh ¾ of an inch wide and one ¼ that width are required. It may be netted in flox silk or fine lambs’-wool.

Net a row of 60 stitches and back again with the large mesh (these are the middle rows).[85] Net a row with the fine mesh. The next row is netted with the large mesh 3 stitches in each stitch, then a row with the fine mesh taking each stitch separately. Afterwards a row with the large mesh 2 stitches in each of the first 60 stitches, 1 in each of the next 60, and 2 in each of the rest; a narrow row; a Wide row without increase; a narrow row; a wide row 3 stitches in each stitch. Repeat these rows on the other side, beginning at the first narrow row.

Run a ribbon through the middle rows, sew the ends to the ribbon and the Cephaline is made.

Diamond Knitting.

Cast on any number of stitches that will divide by 11; begin with the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 6 stitches, knit 2 stitches taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 1 stitch; repeat these 11 stitches all round. A plain round. Knit 1 stitch, bring the cotton forward, slip[86] a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 4, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward and knit 2 stitches; repeat these 11 stitches all round. A plain round. Knit 2 stitches, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 2, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 3, repeat these round. A plain round. Knit 3 stitches, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over the knitted one, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 4, repeat these 11 stitches round. A plain round. Knit 4 stitches, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped over the knitted stitch, knit 5 stitches. A plain round. Knit 3 stitches, knit 2 together, bring the cotton forward, knit 1, bring the cotton forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, pull the slipped stitch over, knit 3; repeat these stitches round. You will perceive that this round begins another round of diamonds, and that you increase from the point of the diamond, and decrease the other half diamond to a point.

[87]

Another Diamond Knitting.

Four needles are required.

Cast on any number of stitches that will divide by 8, bring the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 6, repeat these 8 stitches all round. Knit a plain round. Bring the thread forward knit 1 stitch, bring the thread forward slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it; knit 3, knit 2 taken together, repeat this all round. Plain round. Bring the thread forward, knit 3 stitches, bring the thread forward slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 1, knit 2 taken together, repeat this all round. Plain round. Bring the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 1, knit 2 taken together, bring the thread forward knit 3 stitches, repeat this all round. Plain round. Bring the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 2[88] taken together, bring the thread forward knit 4, repeat this all round. Plain round. Knit 1, bring the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 5, repeat this all round. Plain round. Knit 2 stitches, bring the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 4, repeat this all round. Plain round. Knit 2 stitches taken together, bring the thread forward knit 1 stitch, bring the thread forward slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 3, repeat this all round. Plain round. Knit 1, bring the thread forward, knit 3 stitches, bring the thread forward, slip 1 stitch, knit 1 and pull the slipped stitch over it, knit 2 taken together, bring the thread forward and repeat the last 8 stitches all round. Plain round. Now you will see you are to begin decreasing the 5 stitches of the smaller diamonds; and you have enough of the pattern done to see how to proceed. The 3 middle stitches of the larger diamond are always plain knitting, and the 1st decrease is done with the remaining stitch of the small diamond.

[89]

Small Feather Pattern.

As this is knitted round, 4 needles are required. It is very pretty for a purse or mitten.

Cast on any number of stitches that will divide by 13. Begin with the thread forward knit 1 stitch, bring the thread forward knit 1 stitch, thus increasing 2 loop stitches, knit 2 stitches taken together, twice, knit 1 stitch, this is the centre stitch of one stripe, decrease twice, increase twice, and repeat these 13 stitches all round. Knit 3 rounds. Repeat these 4 rounds.

Double Eyelet Knitting.

Four needles are required.

Cast on any number of stitches that will divide by 7. Begin with the thread forward, knit 1 stitch, decrease by taking 2 stitches together, knit 1 stitch, decrease 1 stitch, increase 1[90] stitch, repeat these 7 stitches all round, and knit 2 rounds plain. Repeat these 3 rounds.

Gouty Shoes.

For the sole cast on 10 stitches and knit 3 rows. Knit on, increasing 1 stitch near the middle of every alternate row until you have 20 stitches. Increase every 4th row, until you have 24 stitches. Knit 12 rows. Increase twice, 1 stitch in every 5th row. Knit 8 rows. Decrease 4 times in every 4th row. Decrease 8 times, 1 stitch in every 2nd row; twice, 1 in every 4th row. Knit 4 plain rows. Increase 9 times, 1 stitch in every 4th row. Decrease 4 times, 1 stitch in every 4th row. Decrease 3 times, 2 stitches in every 2nd row. Decrease 2 stitches in every row until only 5 stitches are left, which are to be cast off.

This is to be knitted with very coarse cotton, wound double, and needles No. 16.

For the upper part cast on 11 stitches, with[91] needles No. 8, and coarse lambs’-wool; increase 2 stitches in every row until you have 25 stitches. Increase 2 stitches in every other row until you have 31, then 2 stitches in every 3rd row until you have 37. Knit 2 rows plain. Knit 12 stitches backwards and forwards until long enough for the quarter. Cast off 13 stitches and knit the remaining 12 backwards and forwards, to correspond with the other side. Sew up the back and fasten in the sole on the wrong side.

To increase and decrease in Double Knitting.

In double knitting you cannot very well increase oftener than every 3 rows, as you do not complete the increase in less than 3 rows. In the 1st row knit 1 stitch behind wherever you wish to increase; in the 2nd row do the same to the stitch adjoining, and in the 3rd row when you come to the increase, knit 1[92] stitch, and pass the next upon another needle, bring the thread forward slip a stitch and replace the one from the 3rd needle, knit it, and continue the row. You will perceive that you cannot increase less than two stitches at once.

Decreasing in double knitting can be done in 2 rows. In the 1st row knit 2 knitting stitches together passing the farther one over the intervening stitch, bring the thread forward and slip 2 stitches (instead of 1). In the 2nd row 2 knitting stitches will come together, knit them taken together. You cannot decrease less than 2 stitches at once.

Double Knitted Soles.

To wear in the shoes.

Cast on 14 stitches, knit in double knitting 2 rows, increase 2 stitches in 3 rows (as directed in the preceding pattern) until you have 24 stitches. Knit 6 rows, then decrease 2[93] stitches every 2 rows until you have but 10 stitches left. Knit 8 rows. Increase until you have 20 stitches. Knit 6 rows. Decrease 2 stitches in 2 rows until you have 12 stitches left, decrease 4 stitches in 2 rows twice and cast off the remaining 4 stitches.

Lambs’-wool Boot.

Four ivory needles and coarse lambs’-wool are required.

Cast 32 stitches on each of 3 needles, knit round 2 stitches plain and 2 ribbed alternately until it is 4 inches long, then take another coloured lambs’-wool and knit 2 rounds of 2 stitches plain and 2 ribbed, decrease in the middle of one needle 1 stitch on each side of a rib for 20 rows; knit 3 inches more without decreasing, then 2 inches with the 1st color, 1 inch with the 2nd, and fasten off by drawing[94] the lambs’-wool through 2 stitches at a time and knotting it. Sew up the boot at the bottom.

Baby’s Lambs’-wool Cap.

Cast on 60 stitches. Knit 3 or 4 rows plain. Knit about 20 turns in double knitting; this will make it 14 inches in length and 7 inches in depth. Knit 12 turns plain and 10 turns double knitting. Knit 2 or 3 turns plain knitting, reducing the number of stitches so as to form the crown. Fasten it up a little way behind, turn back the first part of double knitting, and run a ribbon through it.

Baby’s Hat.

Seven needles No. 16, are required.

Cast 2 stitches on each of 3 needles; knit 2 rounds. Knit 1 round increasing at the back of every stitch. Rib 2 rounds. Knit 1 round[95] increasing at the back of every stitch, and 1 round without increase. Rib 2 rounds. Knit 1 round increasing 3 stitches on each needle, and 1 round plain. Rib 2 rounds. Knit and rib 2 rounds alternately, always increasing 3 stitches on each needle in the 1st plain knitted round, until you can count 7 ribbed welts. Knit 2 rounds and rib 2 rounds alternately without increasing any more for 15 welts. Knit round increasing 5 times on each needle, knit 1 plain round. Continue to knit and rib in the same manner increasing 5 stitches on each needle in the 1st knitted round until the brim is broad enough, perhaps about 13 welts, and cast off.

Have the hat made very stiff, and dried on a shape.

Baby’s Stockings.

With needles No. 15, and fine lambs’-wool.

Cast on 25 stitches; knit a row, increase a stitch at the end. Knit 3 rows increasing at[96] the end of each. After this increase, at the end of every other row only, until there are 36 stitches on the needle. Take off 14 stitches on a 3rd needle and knit the 22 that are left (beginning at the sloping side) backwards and forwards until there are 10 ridges, cast on 14 stitches and make this side like the other by decreasing. When this is done, put the 14 stitches on the needle again, take up 10 stitches in the middle and 14 at the side, knit 4 rows. Knit 2 stitches, increase a stitch, knit the rest increasing again in the last stitch but two. Knit 4 plain rows. Increase as before; continue to knit 4 plain rows and to increase 2 stitches in the 5th until there are 50 stitches. Knit 4 rows and decrease every 5th until there are 40. Purl and knit every alternate 2 stitches for 14 rows; finish with 4 plain rows. When knitted, the stocking must be sewn up and a ribbon run through it to tie it round the ankle.

[97]

Baby’s Gaiters.

Cast on 18 stitches; knit a row; knit a row increasing a stitch at the end; knit a row. Knit a row increasing 1 stitch at the end. A plain row. Increase every other row until there are 30 stitches on the needle. Knit 18 beginning from the sloping side, (take off the remaining 12 on a third needle,) knit backwards and forwards until there are 10 ridges, cast on 12 stitches and decrease in the same proportion as you increased to make the sides match. When the foot is finished, take the 12 stitches from the 3rd needle, take up 10 stitches in the middle and 12 on the side and knit the legging as in the last pattern. Sew it up and bind the foot with white ribbon.

Baby’s Spencer.

Needles No. 14.

Cast on 12 stitches, knit 8 rows, counting the casting on row as one. In the 8th row make 2 holes, (1 near the straight side and one in the[98] middle of the row) by bringing the wool forward and knitting 2 stitches together. Increase a stitch at the end of this row and every 4th row afterwards, until you have 22 stitches. Knit 8 rows, at the end of the 8th row decrease a stitch; knit 4 rows and decrease again at the end of the 4th; after this, decrease every other row until there are only 14 stitches: knit a row and cast off. This is one side of the back; make the other to match it.

The front. Cast on 64 stitches, knit 16 rows, making holes in the 8th row as before directed, then increase by making 2 stitches in 1 six times every other row, about 14 stitches from the beginning and end of the row. Knit a row. Knit 6 stitches backwards and forwards decreasing a stitch every other row (with the needle on which the other stitches are) until only 2 are left; cast them off: if the wool be left loose it need not be broken off. Knit the stitches on the needle and make the other end like that which is finished. Knit 28 rows, gradually decreasing until only 36 stitches are left; then knit 12 stitches [99]backwards and forwards for 24 rows, cast off the 12 stitches and repeat the same at the other end of the row. Sew on the backs, take up the stitches down the back, knit 6 rows and cast off. On one side leave holes for the buttonholes. Take up the stitches round the neck, knit 4 rows, make holes for the string, knit 4 rows and cast off.

The sleeve. Cast on 16 stitches. Increase gradually until you think it wide enough; decrease towards the wrist, knit and rib 2 stitches alternately for about an inch, and finish with 4 plain rows.

Baby’s Stays.

To be knitted in soft cotton or fine lambs’-wool. Needles No. 15.

Cast on 204 stitches. The 6 first and last stitches are knitted every row: knit and rib the rest, knitting 6 stitches then ribbing 6. Knit 60 rows, ribbing those stitches in 1 row which were knitted in the last. After 60 rows have been done, knit and rib 60 stitches,[100] and, instead of finishing the row, turn back and cast off 6 stitches, knit and rib the rest. Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning of the next row (consisting of 54 stitches), rib and knit it. Knit and rib the next row. Decrease at the beginning coming back. Repeat the last 4 rows. Then cast off 12 stitches, knit and rib the rest. Decrease 1 stitch, rib and knit the others. Cast off 12 stitches, knit and rib the rest. Decrease 1 stitch, knit and rib the rest. Cast off 6 stitches, rib and knit the rest. Knit and rib the row. Cast off 6 stitches, knit and cast off the 12 remaining. One side of the back is now finished. Begin to knit with the stitch next to the last of the 6 cast off under the arm. Knit and rib 90 stitches, turn back and cast off 6, knit and rib the rest. Decrease 1 stitch at the beginning of every row until 76 stitches only are left. Decrease 1, rib 6, knit 6, rib 6, knit 6. Cast off 24, rib and knit the remainder. Decrease 1, rib and knit the rest. Cast off 6, knit and rib the rest. Decrease 1, rib and knit the rest. Cast off 6, rib and knit the rest. Rib and knit[101] 12, cast off 6. Knit these 6 stitches backwards and forwards for the shoulder strap. Make the other side of the front and back to match, bind the stays with ribbon, and sew on strings.

Baby’s Sock.

To appear like a shoe and stocking. Eight steel needles, 4 No. 14, and 4 No. 20, and fine German lambs’-wool are required.

Cast 14 stitches on one of the coarse needles, with double lambs’-wool, knit 14 turns, loop 12 stitches on the same needle, 28 on the second and 12 on the third, and pick up the 14 loops on the cast on side of the piece of knitting; you will now have 80 stitches in all on the needles. Knit 6 turns, decrease 1 stitch at the end of each row until you have only 70 stitches. Decrease 2 stitches in the middle of the row, knitting 1 plain stitch between; continue thus decreasing 2 stitches for the heel in the centre of every row, and one at the end for the toe, until you have 60 stitches left. Decrease[102] 2 stitches in the middle, divide the stitches in halves, 29 on each needle, and join it by knitting the two rows together ending at the toe. Pick up 14 loops on the instep, and 56 round the top of the shoe, with a different color knit one round and cast off; this is to look like the binding, and completes the shoe.

For the stocking use the fine needles and single wool. Take up 14 stitches on the instep, behind the chain stitch (or coloured binding). Knit 1 plain row taking up a stitch from the side and knitting that and the last stitch together. Purl 1 row knitting the last stitch and a side stitch together. Knit the next row, bringing the wool before the needle every stitch and knitting 2 stitches taken together. Knit these last 2 rows alternately until you have 12 rows of holes, remembering to take up a stitch at the side and knit it with the last stitch. Then take up 34 stitches round the shoe, behind the chain stitch, continue the pattern as on the instep, when you have 12 rows of holes above the binding, knit 1 plain round adding a stitch after every third[103] stitch, making in all 64 stitches, knit 12 rounds of knitting, and purling 2 stitches alternately. Cast off. Make a small rosette of ribbon, and sew it in front of the shoe.

Netted Curtain.

For a French Bed.

With a mesh 1 inch wide net 130 stitches. 195 rows will complete the curtain.

Moorish Brioche or Cushion.

Choose any number of colored wools, or if preferred, two that contrast well. Two needles, No. 12.

Cast on 60 stitches, bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, (by this you increase by a loop stitch,) bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit 1; repeat these stitches to the end[104] of the row. 2nd row: bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit the loop made last row with the next stitch, bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit the loop and stitch together; repeat these stitches to the end of the row. Knit 6 more rows in the same manner, the stitch is the same throughout. Fasten on the 2nd color, bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit 1. Now instead of continuing the row, turn back. Bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit 1, bring the wool forward, slip a stitch, knit 1. Continue to increase the number you slip and knit by 4 every time, until all the 60 have been knitted. Knit 8 rows of the 1st color, and proceed as before. Twelve of these divisions will make the cushion large enough. Sew it up at the side. Net a fringe with double coarse lambs’-wool to the narrow part, and run in a string to tie it tightly together under the fringe. Make a round cushion, and cover it with the knitting.

[105]

A Blanket.

Two very coarse wooden needles and wool proportionably coarse.

Cast on 30 stitches; knit a few plain rows for the edge; then begin with the wool forward, slip 1 stitch taking it under so as not to twist it, knit 1 stitch, repeat these 2 stitches to the end of the row, and you will find you have increased 15 stitches; repeat this row with this only difference, that in future you knit the loop and stitch under it together.

These strips done in squares of different colors are very pretty.

Blanket in strips.

Needles and wool the same as for the preceding pattern.

Cast on 32 stitches, knit 7 rows common[106] knitting; then begin double knitting,106-* knitting 4 stitches plain on each side for a border, knit about 24 rows, knit 8 rows plain and then double knitting again; continue these squares until the piece is long enough. It is very pretty if the squares are done in different colors.

Netted Lace.

Begin on a straight foundation with a mesh No. 16. Of course the number of stitches will depend on the length that is wished for. 216 will make about a yard.

Net 24 plain rows. Take a mesh ¼ of an inch wide, or a trifle wider, net 3 stitches in the 1st stitch, pass 2 stitches, net 5 stitches in the next, pass 2, and net 5 stitches in every 3rd stitch to the end of the row. Take the[107] small mesh and net every stitch you have increased as a single stitch, and finish with another row on the small mesh.

Puff Netting.

Very pretty for caps.

Begin your netting on a foundation that will divide by 10. Net 9 stitches, net 9 stitches in the 10th; repeat to the end of the row. Net 3 rows, 1 stitch in every stitch. In the next row (which will make the 5th from the increase), take the first 9 stitches as 1 stitch, net the following 9 stitches, repeat to the end of the row. Begin again.

A Cool Night-cap.

Puff netting.

The mesh to be ¼ inch wide.

[108]

Begin on a round foundation of 71 stitches; net 3 plain rounds. In the 4th round, net 5 stitches, net 5 stitches in the 6th stitch; repeat this all round. Net 2 rounds, netting one stitch in every stitch. In the next round take the 5 plain stitches as one, net 5 stitches, repeat all round. Begin again with the 4th round (increasing 5 stitches after the decrease). When the cap is deep enough net one round putting the cotton twice round the mesh; run a ribbon in at the top and bottom, and tie the top string tight.

Suspenders.

Two needles No. 16.

Cast on 18 stitches, and knit about 6 rows in double knitting with the thread once round the needle, knit 9 stitches, take off the other 9 on another needle, and knit the first 9 backwards and forwards until it is long enough for a button-hole; take back the cotton and knit[109] up the other 9 until both are even, (the loop which is left from carrying the thread down can be sewn in afterwards); knit 6 more rows double knitting, and 2 rows double knitting with the thread twice round the needle. Knit 1 row of plain knitting, increasing 1 stitch in every 2, which will make in all 27. Then in the front row; knit the 2nd stitch first, drawing it over the 1st, knit the 1st, knit the 4th and 3rd, 6th and 5th, and repeat the same to the end, which will be 1 knitted stitch. Back row; purl the 1st stitch, taking 2 stitches together as if you were going to decrease, but pick up again the stitch nearest to the right hand and purl it: repeat this to the last stitch, which is to be purled. Repeat these 2 rows until you think it long enough, then begin double knitting, decrease to 18 stitches again, knit about 2 inches and finish in a point.

These suspenders are firmer and less elastic than those given in the first series.

[110]

Parisian Net Knitting.

This pattern is very pretty for a foot-muff, blanket, or sofa guard.

Take German lambs’-wool of two colors that contrast well; pink and white form a pretty mixture.

Cast on an even number of stitches, and with the white wool knit several rows before beginning the pattern. 1st row; fasten on the pink wool forward, knit the first stitch with the white wool, pass the pink round the needle bringing it forward again, and purl the next stitch with it; pass the purled stitch on to the left-hand needle and knit it with the white wool, knit 1 stitch with the white, pass the pink wool round the needle, purl 1 stitch and pass it back on to the left-hand needle, knit it and the following stitch with the white wool; continue the same to the end of the row. 2nd row; purl the white stitches with the[111] white wool, and slip the pink loops, taking care not to twist them or change the side which is forward. 3rd row; knit the white stitches with the white wool and slip the pink loops. 4th row; purl the 1st stitch with the white wool, turn the pink wool (which is now behind) round the needle, and with it knit the pink loop and following white stitch taken together, slip the stitch on to the left hand needle and purl it with the white wool, purl 1 stitch with the white, pass the pink wool round the needle, and knit with it the pink loop and following stitch taken together, slip it on to the other needle and purl it with the white wool, repeat the same to the end. 5th row; knit all the white stitches with the white wool and slip the pink loops. 6th row; purl the white stitches with the white wool and slip the pink. 7th row; knit 1 stitch with the white wool, pass the pink wool (which is forward) round the needle and with it purl the pink loop and following white stitch taken together, observing to take the pink loop by the under side, slip the stitch on to the left hand needle and knit[112] it and the following white stitch with the white wool; repeat the same to the end of the row: as the 7th row takes the place of the 1st, continue with the 2nd row.

Diamond Knitting.

Cast on 14 stitches for each pattern. 1st round: knit 12 stitches, knit 2 taken together, and bring the cotton forward; repeat the same. 2nd round: knit 2 stitches taken together, knit 9, knit 2 taken together and bring the cotton forward, knit 1 and bring the cotton forward again. 3rd round: knit 2 stitches taken together, knit 7, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 3, and bring the cotton forward again. 4th round: knit 2 stitches taken together, knit 5, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 5, and bring the cotton forward again. 5th round: knit 2 taken together, knit 3, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 7, bring the cotton forward. 6th round: knit 2[113] stitches taken together, knit 1, knit 2 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 9, bring the cotton forward. 7th round: knit 3 taken together, bring the cotton forward, knit 5, bring the cotton forward, knit 2 taken together, knit 4, bring the cotton forward. Begin again.

Four Patterns, for D’Oyleys, Toilet Covers, Baby’s Quilts, or Basket Napkins.

Two needles, No. 22 or 23, and very fine knitting cotton.

No. 1.

Cast on a number of stitches that will divide into an even number of threes. Knit and rib 3 stitches alternately for 3 rounds. In the next 3 rounds, rib and knit 3 stitches alternately.

[114]

No. 2.

Cast on a number of stitches as for the last pattern. Knit and rib 3 stitches alternately for 2 rows. The following rows begin so as to bring the first ribbed stitch over the last knitted: this is to make the ribbed and knitted ridges go in diagonal stripes.

No. 3.

Cast on a number of stitches that will divide by 10. Knit 1 stitch, rib 9, repeat the same to the end of the row. 2nd row: rib 1 stitch, knit 7, rib 2. 3rd row: knit 3, rib 5, knit 2. 4th row: rib 3, knit 3, rib 4. 5th row: knit 5, rib 1, knit 4. 6th row: knit 4, rib 1, knit 5. 7th row: rib 4, knit 3, rib 3. 8th row: knit 2, rib 5, knit 3. 9th row: rib 2, knit 7, rib 1. 10th row: rib 9, knit 1. Begin again.

[115]

No. 4.

Cast on an even number of stitches. 1st row: knit every stitch with the cotton twice round the needle. 2nd row: begin by dropping one twist of the 1st stitch, knit the rest of this stitch with the 1st twist of the next, taking them together; finish the row, knitting 2 threads taken together, knit the last stitch. Begin again.

Mazaniello Cap.

Four Needles,
And Wool of two colors which contrast well.

Cast on 30 stitches. 1st row is purled. 2nd row, slip the 1st stitch and knit the row taking two stitches together to the last stitch which knit. 3rd row; slip the 1st stitch, purl the next, raise a loop between this stitch and the next and purl it, repeat these 2 stitches to the end. 4th row; knit plain. These 4 rows form one[116] stripe of diamonds. Take the second colored wool and purl 1 row, repeat the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th rows. Repeat these 8 rows until you have 15 stripes of diamonds in each colour: Cast off.

Pick up 60 stitches on the side of the piece you have been knitting; (i. e. 2 in each stripe of diamonds). Take first the 2nd color and afterwards the 1st, and repeat the 4 rows as given above, until you have 7 stripes of one color and 6 of the other. Cast off loosely. This piece, when the cap is finished is wrong side outwards as it is to be turned up all round.

To finish the crown, pick up 60 stitches on 3 needles and with the 2nd color repeat the pattern, observing that its right side must be the right side of the cap, (consequently the wrong side of the piece at the bottom). In the 4th round reduce 1 stitch in every 4. Repeat the pattern with the 1st colors. In the 4th round, knit 2, knit 2 taken together, repeat to the end of the round. In the 4th round of the 3rd round of diamonds reduce every other[117] stitch. In the 4th round of the 4th round of diamonds, thread a worsted needle with the wool and pass it through all the stitches, draw them up tight and fasten off.

The cap may be finished with a cord and tassel to match in colors, or with a tassel only.

Muff, in Spots or Stars.

Two wooden needles, No. 10, and for a small muff 1 ounce of blue and 1 ounce of black fleecy. Double that quantity for a large size.

For a small muff cast on 60 stitches, for a large one 84. The number must divide into 3 equal numbers. Cast on the stitches with the black wool, purl 1 row. 2nd row; bring the wool forward and knit 2 stitches taken together, (every 2nd row with the black wool must begin like this) bring the wool forward, knit 3 stitches pull the first over the 2 last, repeat these 3 stitches to the end, when you will find you have one stitch left, bring the[118] wool forward and knit it. Join on the blue wool and purl 1 row. 2nd row; bring the wool forward, knit 2 taken together, knit 2 stitches and pull the stitch in which you decreased over them, (every 2nd blue row begins thus) bring the wool forward, knit 3 stitches pull the 1st over the 2 last, repeat these 3 stitches to the end of the row. Use the black wool and repeat the whole. For a small muff do 21 stripes of each color, for a large one 42. Cast off.

To make up a small muff you must buy 5-8ths of gros-de-naples, 1½ oz. of fine carded wool and 1 oz. of fine horse-hair. Double the silk in halves and place on it 1 layer of wool. 1 layer of horse-hair and a second layer of wool. Quilt these to one-half of the silk and fold the other half over, and sew it to the knitted cover; turn the muff inside out and sew up first the knitted part and then the silk. Finish the muff at the edges by a cord or a quilling of ribbon.

[119]

Another Muff.

Two needles No. 10 and 3 skeins of coarse fleecy.

Cast on sixty stitches. Knit 1 row; rib 1 row; knit 1 row taking 2 stitches together all the way. 4th row; knit 1 stitch, pick up and knit a loop between the stitches, continue the same to the end of the row. As by this you would lose 1 stitch, this must be prevented by picking up and knitting a loop alternately, before beginning or at the end of every 4th row.

Make up the muff like the preceding pattern.


[120]

TERMS USED IN KNITTING.

A turn means two rows.

To turn means to change from plain to purled stitches, or the reverse.

A ridge is formed by two rows when knitting with only two pins.

A loop stitch is formed by passing the thread before the needle, and, in knitting the next stitch, letting it take its usual place.

To increase in knitting a Quilt, care should always be taken to increase by knitting twice through the last stitch, which is done by knitting a stitch, and then, without taking out the needle, knitting a second at the back.

To fasten on in knitting. It is a secure fastening to lay the two ends contrary-wise to each other, and knit a few stitches with them both.

To narrow or decrease is to make small, to lessen, as in shaping a stocking.

Ribbed stitch, purl stitch, turned, or seam stitch, are all terms having the same meaning. A[121] turned stitch is made by bringing the cotton before the needle, and instead of putting the needle over the upper cotton, it is put under.

To slip, take off, or pass a stitch, is to change it from one needle to another without knitting it.

To take under, means to pass the right hand needle through the stitch on the left hand one, so as still to keep the same side of the stitch towards you.

Welts are the rounds of ribbed stitches done at the top of stockings, to prevent their rolling up.

Cast off means to end your work in the following manner: knit 2 stitches, pass the first over the second, and continue the same until you have but one left, which is finished by passing your cotton through it.

To decrease is to lessen the number of stitches by knitting 2 taken together.

To increase, or make a double stitch, is to knit one stitch in the usual way, then, without slipping out the left hand needle, to pass the thread forward and knit a second stitch,[122] putting the needle under the stitch. The thread must be put back when the stitch is finished.

Hang on, means cast on.

Bring the thread forward, means to pass it between the needles towards you.

Cast over is a term I believe sometimes used by knitters, to signify, bring the cotton forward. I have only used it to express, bring the cotton over the needle, quite round.

Round the needle, means the same as the last term.

Reversed, means quite round the needle, the cotton being passed over the needle, and then carried back to its place.

Together, means knit 2 stitches in 1.

Set, or Tuft, the bunches of cotton used in making some of the Fringes.

To widen means to increase.

The netting meshes are numbered from the knitting needle gauge, as I am not aware there is any other rule for them.

2-* If you wish to make a seam on the outside of the glove, or a pattern down the back, it may be done by purling one or more stitches.

8-* These stitches may be decreased again or not.

24-* Double knitting. Begin with the wool forward, slip a stitch, pass the wool back, knit a stitch, continue to repeat these 2 stitches. Double knitting cannot be done round.

62-* In rows like this always keep the cotton before in slipping a stitch.

106-* See Contents—Double Knitting. For a blanket it is better to put the wool twice round the needle in the knitted stitches.


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Transcriber’s Note

The following errors have been maintained.

Page Error Correction
ii Chequed Chequered
7 long enough. long enough,
12 mesh, In mesh. In
50 next round. by next round by
69 the 9th, the 9th.
73 86 stiches; 86 stitches
82 and go on, and go on.
110 sofa guard. sofa guard,
122 needle guage needle gauge

The following words were inconsistently spelled:

  • D’Oyleys / Doyleys
  • Honey-comb / Honeycomb






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Written and maintained by
Ronald Hunter
           
  Copyright © Ronald Hunter, 2005. All rights reserved.
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